Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Guida A.,University of Modena and Reggio Emilia | Masini C.,AO Santa Maria Nuova | Masini C.,Italian Nephro Oncology Group Gruppo Italiano Of Oncologia Nefrologica Gion | Milella M.,Regina Elena Cancer Institute | And 11 more authors.
Future Oncology | Year: 2015

Aims: This retrospective study aimed to investigate safety and efficacy of everolimus in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) and end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis. Patients & methods: From November 2009 to December 2012, 11 mRCC patients undergoing dialysis were treated with everolimus after failure of anti-VEGF therapy at six Italian institutions. Patient characteristics, safety and outcomes were collected. Results: Progression-free survival and overall survival were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 9.01 and 15.7 months, respectively. No unexpected adverse events were reported. Conclusion: Everolimus appears to be safe in mRCC patients with renal impairment or end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis. Larger prospective studies are required to confirm these findings. © 2015 Future Medicine Ltd.


Porta C.,University of Pavia | Porta C.,Italian Nephro Oncology Group Gruppo Italiano Of Oncologia Nefrologica Gion | Ganini C.,University of Pavia | Paglino C.,University of Pavia | Paglino C.,Italian Nephro Oncology Group Gruppo Italiano Of Oncologia Nefrologica Gion
Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy | Year: 2013

In the 5th century B.C., Zeno of Elea offered arguments that led to conclusions contradicting what we all know from our experience. The arguments were paradoxes for the ancient philosophers and it took centuries to demonstrate that they were not true. For example, in his Achilles and the tortoise paradox, fast running Achilles races to catch a slower tortoise that has a head start; so, if Achilles hopes to overtake the tortoise, he must run first to the place where the tortoise presently is, but by the time he arrives there, it would have crawled to a new place, so then Achilles must run to this new place, but the tortoise meanwhile will have crawled on, and so forth Achilles will never catch the tortoise, concludes Zeno. From this well known paradox, it appears clearly that from wrong premises come wrong conclusions, something that for years has affected our perception of the role of immunotherapy in kidney cancer. © 2013 Informa UK, Ltd.


Paglino C.,University of Pavia | Paglino C.,Italian Nephro Oncology Group Gruppo Italiano Of Oncologia Nefrologica Gion | Imarisio I.,University of Pavia | Imarisio I.,Italian Nephro Oncology Group Gruppo Italiano Of Oncologia Nefrologica Gion | And 6 more authors.
Future Oncology | Year: 2012

Aim: Sunitinib is an orally active multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor that exerts its antitumor effects primarily through the selective inhibition of VEGF. Novel targeted therapies such as sunitinib have transformed the treatment of advanced metastatic renal cell carcinomas, particularly those with clear cell histology. Here, our experience in patients with non-clear cell kidney cancer treated as part of the sunitinib Expanded Access Program is reported. Materials & methods: This was a retrospective assessment of 21 patients with non-clear cell renal cell carcinoma who were treated with oral sunitinib 50 mg/day in repeated 6 weekly cycles (4 weeks on and 2 weeks off). Disease assessment and physical examination were recorded at baseline and tumor assessments were performed every 3 months, according to Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors. The primary outcome measure was progression-free survival. Results: Patients received an average of 6.38 cycles of sunitinib; one patient was classified as a complete responder and two as partial responders. The overall response rate was 14.3% and clinical benefit was attained by 52.4%. The median progression-free survival was 4.1 months while median overall survival was 14.6 months. In general, sunitinib was well tolerated and only three patients experienced a grade 3 toxicity, which resolved with dosage reduction. Conclusion: As expected, sunitinib exerted lower antitumor activity in patients with non-clear cell renal cell carcinoma than was achieved in the general population with metastatic kidney cancer. However, responses (one complete and two partial) were documented and clinical benefit was observed in more than half of all patients. © 2012 Future Medicine Ltd.

Discover hidden collaborations