Orléans, France
Orléans, France

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Diaz M.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Robert J.-L.,ISTO | Schroeder P.A.,University of Georgia | Prost R.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research
Clays and Clay Minerals | Year: 2010

Far-infrared (FIR) analysis of synthetic Mg-, Ni-, Co-, and Fe-phlogopites coupled with structural data from X-ray diffraction revealed that the K interlayer environments are directly related to octahedral sheet composition and geometry. The general phlogopite formula, KM2+ 3 (Si3Al)O10(OH)2, was varied according to octahedral compositions, where M2+ = Mg2+, Fe2+, Co2+, and Ni2+. Octahedral substitutions have a direct effect on the b lattice parameter, which is related to the tetrahedral-octahedral sheet misfit and manifested by change in the tetrahedral rotation angle (a). The ditrigonal interlayer cavity geometry and the potential for retention of the compensating cations therefore varies according to the ionic size and the types and oxidation state of octahedral cations. These structural features appear as frequency shifts on FIR spectra. When Mg2+ is replaced by a smaller cation, Ni2+, the b parameter decreases and the tetrahedral rotation angle, a, increases, inducing the collapse of the ditrigonal ring. When this happens, the local anisotropy of the interlayer site increases, resulting in every other six out of 12 K-O bonds becoming shorter and the in-plane K-O vibration band shifts slightly to greater wavenumbers. Synthetic phlogopites with octahedral substitutions by cations of larger ionic radii (i.e. Co2+ and Fe2+) exhibit b parameter increases, where in the case of the annite end-member, a decreases to almost 0° As a decreases, compensating cation sites become more hexagonal like and the nearest K-O bond increases in length. The K-O vibration bands move toward much smaller wavenumbers. Far infrared offers the potential for a new approach to study the retention of interlayer cations in other phyllosilicates and the mechanisms by which they are altered, such as heating or by weathering reactions in the environment.


Bakkas B.,University Ibn Zohr | Douzi H.,University Ibn Zohr | Ibhi A.,University Ibn Zohr | Mammass D.,University Ibn Zohr | And 3 more authors.
International Conference on Multimedia Computing and Systems -Proceedings | Year: 2011

Percentages of metal are an important physical property in meteorite research and in studies of meteorite impact craters. Physical properties of meteorites have been used to rapidly classify meteorites into main classes and groups. In this paper, we use a max Entropy method [1] for 3D segmentation and visualization of 3D scanned images of meteorites collected in Morocco. This non-destructive analysis allows studying the mineral composition of these rocks. Results show that the percentage of metal is identical when estimated by 3D analysis compared to classical measurements (point counter). The main advantage of the 3D analysis is that the sample is not destroyed, more accurate, not expensive and faster. © 2011 IEEE.


Amon A.,Rennes Institute of Physics | Nguyen V.B.,University Paris Diderot | Bruand A.,ISTO | Crassous J.,Rennes Institute of Physics | Clement E.,University Paris Diderot
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2012

We study experimentally the dynamical heterogeneities occurring at slow shear, in a model amorphous glassy material, i.e., a 3D granular packing. The deformation field is resolved spatially by using a diffusive wave spectroscopy technique. The heterogeneities show up as localized regions of strong deformations spanning a mesoscopic size of about 10 grains and called the "hot spots." The spatial clustering of hot spots is linked to the subsequent emergence of shear bands. Quantitatively, their appearance is associated with the macroscopic plastic deformation, and their rate of occurrence gives a physical meaning to the concept of "fluidity," recently used to describe the local and nonlocal rheology of soft glassy materials. © 2012 American Physical Society.


Crepisson C.,CNRS Institute of Earth Sciences | Morard G.,Paris-Sorbonne University | Bureau H.,Paris-Sorbonne University | Prouteau G.,ISTO | And 5 more authors.
Earth and Planetary Science Letters | Year: 2014

The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) beneath the continents is a key interface in plate tectonics, yet its nature remains elusive. A partial melt layer has been advocated to explain its geophysical characteristics. However, the main counter-argument is that such a layer cannot be stable as melts should rise through the lithosphere. Density measurements of volatile-containing alkali basalts taken as a proxy for LAB melts show that they are neutrally buoyant at the pressure (P)-temperature (T) conditions of the LAB under continents. Complementary X-ray diffraction and Raman data provide structural insights on melt compaction mechanisms. Basalts generated below the lithosphere may thus be gravitationally trapped and accumulate over time. Their presence provides answers to key questions on continental lithosphere geodynamics, and in particular on cratonic keels stability. This buoyancy trap would cease to exist at higher mantle T such as those relevant of the Archean, and as such, could be linked to the onset of plate tectonics. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Ali F.,University of Savoy | Ali F.,Hazara University | Ali F.,Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences | Reinert L.,University of Savoy | And 5 more authors.
Ultrasonics Sonochemistry | Year: 2014

The effects of temperature, time, solvent and sonication conditions under air and Argon are described for the preparation of micron and sub-micron sized vermiculite particles in a double-jacketed Rosett-type or cylindrical reactor. The resulting materials were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, BET surface area analysis, chemical analysis (elemental analysis), Thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) and Laser Granulometry. The sonicated vermiculites displayed modified particle morphologies and reduced sizes (observed by scanning electron microscopy and laser granulometry). Under the conditions used in this work, sub-micron sized particles were obtained after 5 h of sonication, whereas longer times promoted aggregation again. Laser granulometry data revealed also that the smallest particles were obtained at high temperature while it is generally accepted that the mechanical effects of ultrasound are optimum at low temperatures according to physical/chemical properties of the used solvent. X-ray diffraction results indicated a reduction of the crystallite size along the basal direction [0 0 1]; but structural changes were not observed. Sonication at different conditions also led to surface modifications of the vermiculite particles brought out by BET surface measurements and Infrared Spectroscopy. The results indicated clearly that the efficiency of ultrasound irradiation was significantly affected by different parameters such as temperature, solvent, type of gas and reactor type. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


PubMed | University of Savoy, Hazara University, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences and ISTO
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Ultrasonics sonochemistry | Year: 2014

The effects of temperature, time, solvent and sonication conditions under air and Argon are described for the preparation of micron and sub-micron sized vermiculite particles in a double-jacketed Rosett-type or cylindrical reactor. The resulting materials were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, BET surface area analysis, chemical analysis (elemental analysis), Thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) and Laser Granulometry. The sonicated vermiculites displayed modified particle morphologies and reduced sizes (observed by scanning electron microscopy and laser granulometry). Under the conditions used in this work, sub-micron sized particles were obtained after 5h of sonication, whereas longer times promoted aggregation again. Laser granulometry data revealed also that the smallest particles were obtained at high temperature while it is generally accepted that the mechanical effects of ultrasound are optimum at low temperatures according to physical/chemical properties of the used solvent. X-ray diffraction results indicated a reduction of the crystallite size along the basal direction [001]; but structural changes were not observed. Sonication at different conditions also led to surface modifications of the vermiculite particles brought out by BET surface measurements and Infrared Spectroscopy. The results indicated clearly that the efficiency of ultrasound irradiation was significantly affected by different parameters such as temperature, solvent, type of gas and reactor type.


Software companies hoping to bid on government contracts in the future must now add a set of standards software ID tags to their software PISCATAWAY, NJ--(Marketwired - Nov 10, 2016) - TagVault.org Board Chair, Michael Godsey of Microsoft notes that, "Seeing ISO/IEC standard 19770-2 listed as a mandatory standard on the DoD IT Standards Registry provides concrete proof to the software publishing industry that SWID tags are a priority. TagVault.org is proud to be the industry alliance leader in bringing all the 19770-2 and the National Institute of Standards and Technology Internal Report 8060 requirements together for the creation and validation of Software ID tags (SWID)." TagVault.org is the neutral, not-for-profit leading the way on developing the standard for SWID tags. The DoD IT Standards Registry listing all requirements is available here. The DOD IT Standards Registry shows ISO/IEC Standard 19770-2 is now listed as a mandatory Standard. The objective of ISO Standard 19770-2 is to give organizations of all sizes information and to assist with minimizing risks and costs of IT Asset Management (ITAM) assets. While SWID tags are not a new concept in the industry, advancements in security and software asset tracking require a new level of standard. SWID tags, and the utilities to create and sign them, are used by security software and asset tracking software to identity the software installed on any given system or across a network. By identifying and authenticating the software in a standard way, the standard adds another layer of safety to the system, and saves time and energy by eliminating the computing overhead for servers in datacenters and clouds. The standard also reduces costs for software and cyber security companies who now don't have to spend development cycles on creating, advancing, and maintaining proprietary solutions. Companies like Microsoft, IBM, and Symantec are at the forefront of this movement, and are part of TagVault.Org organization. TagVault.org is the neutral not-for-profit validation authority for software tagging, primarily focused on software identification tags (as specified by ISO/IEC 19770-2) and software entitlement tags (as specified by ISO/IEC 19770-3). TagVault.org provides a shared library of software tools, technical knowledge and communications forums that decrease the costs of creating, managing and using software identification tags. About TagVault.Org TagVault.org is a Federation Member Program of the IEEE Industry Standards and Technology Organization (ISTO) and publishes its bylaws for public access. The TagVault.Org Board of Directors includes, Microsoft, IBM, Symantec and the Department of Homeland Security. Organizations interested in joining TagVault.org can download the membership packet from www.tagvault.org.


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

New industry alliance to enable new datacenter design innovation PISCATAWAY, NJ--(Marketwired - Nov 10, 2016) - The IEEE Industry Standards and Technology Organization (ISTO), comprised of leading international industry groups and consortia dedicated to the advancement of standardized technologies for the benefit of industry, today announces its newest federation program member -- the OpenCAPI Consortium. The OpenCAPI Consortium (OpenCAPI) is a standards setting alliance whose mission is to create a new open coherent high performance bus interface and to promote its benefits and grow market/ecosystem adoption. The work being done in OpenCAPI will enable a new level of innovation and a set of advanced solutions designed to improve system-level performance. OpenCAPI will offer its first bus architecture specification that will provide an open, architecture agnostic, high performance pathway between the microprocessor and different types of technology -- advanced memory, accelerators, networking and storage -- to more tightly integrate their functions within servers. This data-centric approach to server design, which puts the compute power closer to the data, removes inefficiencies in traditional system architectures to help eliminate system bottlenecks and significantly improve server performance. A preliminary standard is available today for download at no cost on the OpenCAPI Consortium website. "OpenCAPI is addressing new technology challenges to meet the growing demands of accelerated computing and emerging advanced memory/storage solutions by allowing an open architecture to maximize industry participation," says Myron Slota, president, OpenCAPI Consortium, program director, IBM. "ISTO has a proven track record supporting these types of open organizations. The guidance and support offered by the ISTO team will allow our members to focus on the technical work of OpenCAPI Consortium." Since its inception in 1999, ISTO has partnered with 50+ international industry groups, like OpenCAPI, providing the legal and operational frameworks and best practices required to accomplish technical missions quickly and cost-effectively. "The OpenCAPI Consortium is poised to advance the high performance computing and cloud industry," said Marco W. Migliaro, president and CEO, ISTO. "ISTO welcomes the opportunity to share the resources and best practices which have laid the groundwork for success in other similar organizations." For more information visit the OpenCAPI Consortium website. About IEEE Industry Standards and Technology Organization (ISTO) ISTO is the premier trusted partner of the global technology community for the development, adoption, and certification of industry standards and technology solutions that benefit industry. An international federation of member programs, its mission is to facilitate the life-cycle of industry standards development through a dedicated staff committed to offering vendor neutrality, quality support and member satisfaction. ISTO Programs span the spectrum of today's information and communications technologies. For more information, visit www.ieee-isto.org.


PISCATAWAY, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The IEEE-ISTO Printer Working Group (PWG) has announced that 25 new printers have achieved IPP Everywhere certification. IPP Everywhere enables network printing using a single universal set of software, without requiring any vendor-specific drivers to expose all printer features and functionality. IPP Everywhere enables printing on all forms of mobile devices, including laptops, phones and tablets. IPP Everywhere printers can be easily discovered and immediately used. This removes a major hassle associated with printing from hotels, meeting centers and elsewhere. Ninety-eight percent of recent network printers support Internet Printing Protocol [PWG 5100.12-2015], which is the core technology underlying IPP Everywhere [PWG 5100.14-2013]. IPP Everywhere Certified printers may be identified by the PWG's "IPP Everywhere" trademark logo, available here: http://www.pwg.org/ipp/ipp-everywhere.png The first IPP Everywhere certified printers, listed here, are from HP Inc. and include mobile and office printers. Other PWG member printer vendors are expected to announce additional IPP Everywhere certified printers in coming months. The PWG is a program of the IEEE Industry Standards and Technology Organization (ISTO). Members include printer manufacturers, print server developers, operating system vendors, network software developers, network connectivity vendors, and print management application providers. All brands and trademarks are the property of their respective owners.


Nguyen A.-N.,University of Savoy | Nguyen A.-N.,CEA Marcoule Nuclear Site | Balima F.,University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 | Penhoud P.,ISTO | And 11 more authors.
Applied Clay Science | Year: 2014

Vermiculite materials were obtained by uniaxial pressing of potassic vermiculite powders obtained by sonication without any binder addition. The vermiculite powders, made of aggregates of particles with nanometric thickness and micrometric in plane dimension, were pressed in the range 17.7-80MPa at room temperature and 200°C, and further annealed in the range 400-800°C. Pressing powders at 200°C instead of 25°C allowed the slight increase of the density of the formed materials (from 1.9 to 2g·cm-3) due to the desorption of the water molecules from the interaggregate and interparticle spaces, allowing a higher densification. The density was also increased by tailoring the particle size distribution. The pressed materials were formed of oriented arrangement of vermiculite aggregates. The porous structure, characterized by mercury porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy, and small angle X-ray scattering, was modelled by oriented oblate spheroidal pores formed in the voids between the stacked aggregates organized in a structure possessing a cylindrical symmetry. The porous structure was found to vary with the pressure and the annealing temperature. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

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