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Birkenfeld S.,Gastroenterology Unit | Belfer R.G.,Rabin Medical Center | Chared M.,Gastroenterology Unit | Vilkin A.,Rabin Medical Center | And 9 more authors.
Journal of Medical Screening | Year: 2011

Objective: To compare the uptake of faecal immunochemical occult blood test (FIT) with guaiac faecal occult blood test (gFOBT) in a screening programme, with specific attention to the demographic and socioeconomic factors that might affect test uptake. Setting: The Clalit Health Service screening programme, Israel. Methods: Average-risk individuals aged 50-75 years were randomized into a FITarm or gFOBTarm using a programme based on the socioeconomic status (SES) of their primary care clinics. G-FOBT was performed with Hemoccult SENSA ™ (3 evacuations) and FIT with the OC-MICRO™ (3 evacuations, refrigerating mandated). The GLIMMIX model was used. Results There were 5,464 and 10,668 eligible participants in the FIT and gFOBT arms respectively. Compliance in taking the kits was better (but not statistically significantly better) with gFOBT (37.8% vs. 29.3%; odds ratio [OR] 1.43 [95% CI 0.73-2.80]; P = 0.227). Kit return was higher in the FIT arm (65.0% vs. 78.9%; OR 0.45 [95% CI 0.24-0.83], P = 0.021). Overall test uptake was affected by age, gender, being immigrant and SES (determined by whether or not the participant paid national insurance tax, and the SES of the primary care clinic). The overall uptake of gFOBT and FIT was comparable (OR 0.996 [95% CI 0.46-2.17], P = 0.99). Conclusions: Overall compliance for test uptake was comparable between the two methods despite the more demanding procedure in the FIT arm. Sociodemographic parameters were the major determinants of compliance. An educational programme, with emphasis on the sociodemographic characteristics of the target population, should be instigated.


Kogan L.,Hadassah Ein Kerem University Medical Center | Menczer J.,Gynecologic Oncology Unit | Shejter E.,Maccabi Health Services | Liphshitz I.,Israel National Cancer Registry | Barchana M.,Israel National Cancer Registry
Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics | Year: 2011

Purpose: A population-based study of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3) has hitherto not been performed in Israel. The aim of the present study was to assess selected demographic characteristics of Israeli Jewish CIN3 patients in an attempt to identify the risk factors in this population. Methods: All CIN3 patients diagnosed during 2002-2004 according to the Israel National Cancer Registry were included. Demographic and population data were obtained from the Central Population Registry and from the Israel Central Bureau of Statistics annual abstract reports. The age-standardized incidence rate (ASR) and rate ratios (RR) for each demographic category were calculated. Results: The study comprised 1,108 CIN3 patients (mean age 38.4 years) yielding an ASR of 13.9/100.000. A significantly greater number of CIN3 in the 30-39-year (RR = 2.16) and 40-49-year (RR = 1.74) age groups were observed. The overall rate of single and married women was similar, that in widowed women significantly lower and divorced women significantly higher (RR = 2.37) than in the general population. The mean number of children was 1.7. The rate of patients with 5 + children was significantly higher only in the 30-39-year age group. RR varied with age within each demographic category. The rate of Israeli born was higher and that of other ethnic origins was similar to the population rates. No association between CIN3 and socioeconomic status was found. Conclusion: Greater CIN3 rates were observed in women of 30-49 years, divorced women and Israeli-born women. Great differences in RR between age groups within the demographic categories were observed. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.


Anton-Culver H.,University of California at Irvine | Chang J.,University of California at Irvine | Bray F.,International Agency of Research on Cancer | Znaor A.,International Agency of Research on Cancer | And 9 more authors.
Cancer Epidemiology | Year: 2016

It is important that population-based cancer registries provide accurate and reliable data for public health purposes. These data are essential data for planning of cancer control and prevention. In this study, we examined cancer incidence rates (year 2005–2010) in four MECC registries (Cyprus, Jordan, Israel, Izmir (Turkey)) and compared with the rates in the US. The overall age-standardized incidence rates for males were highest in the US followed by Israeli Jews, Izmir (Turkey), Cyprus, Israeli Arabs, and lowest in Jordan. In women the rates of cancer of all sites were also highest in US women followed by Israeli Jews, Cyprus, Israeli Arabs, Izmir (Turkey), and lowest in Jordan. It is of interest that although site-specific cancer rates differ between the countries studied, prostate, lung and colorectal cancers are within the five most common cancers males in all countries studied. In females, breast colorectal and endometrium cancers are three of the five most common cancers in females in all countries studied. The results presented in this paper can have implications for opportunities in cancer control and prevention in these countries. Future studies on individual cancer sites with highest rates in these Countries are currently underway. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd


Mandelzweig L.,Gertner Institute for Epidemiology & Health Policy Research | Chetrit A.,Gertner Institute for Epidemiology & Health Policy Research | Amitai T.,Gertner Institute for Epidemiology & Health Policy Research | Oberman B.,Gertner Institute for Epidemiology & Health Policy Research | And 4 more authors.
Supportive Care in Cancer | Year: 2016

Purpose: Improvement in treatment has extended survival of breast cancer patients. Our study aimed to characterize health service use among long-term breast cancer survivors in Israel in order to identify and address specific needs of this subpopulation. Methods: The study population included 250 women diagnosed with breast cancer, 8–12 years prior to study initiation (cases), and 250 individually matched cancer-free controls. Participants were recruited from the second largest Israeli HMO, and data were collected through personal interviews. ORs and 95 % CIs were estimated using conditional logistic regression and generalized estimating equations. Results: Greater use of health services was observed among cases, compared to an age-matched comparison group, expressed by more visits to family physicians and specialists, longer duration of visits, more requests for referrals, more frequent contact with emergency services, and hospitalizations. The study groups were similar regarding socioeconomic variables, current smoking and physical activity, BMI, and prevalence of reported morbidity. Although 80 % of cases defined the family physician as their main treating physician, half still considered their oncologist responsible for cancer follow-up. Only 14.4 and 10.4 % of cases and controls, respectively, reported receiving psychological support during the year preceding the interview. Conclusions: Further studies should assess the contribution of apprehension concerning health-related issues that still accompany breast cancer survivors, to the excess use of health services. Concern among family practitioners may contribute as well. In addition, our results emphasize the need to improve coordination between the disciplines of oncology and community medicine for the medical care of this group. © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


PubMed | University of California at Irvine, Israel National Cancer Registry, Hacettepe University, National Cancer Registry of Jordan and 4 more.
Type: | Journal: Cancer epidemiology | Year: 2016

It is important that population-based cancer registries provide accurate and reliable data for public health purposes. These data are essential data for planning of cancer control and prevention. In this study, we examined cancer incidence rates (year 2005-2010) in four MECC registries (Cyprus, Jordan, Israel, Izmir (Turkey)) and compared with the rates in the US. The overall age-standardized incidence rates for males were highest in the US followed by Israeli Jews, Izmir (Turkey), Cyprus, Israeli Arabs, and lowest in Jordan. In women the rates of cancer of all sites were also highest in US women followed by Israeli Jews, Cyprus, Israeli Arabs, Izmir (Turkey), and lowest in Jordan. It is of interest that although site-specific cancer rates differ between the countries studied, prostate, lung and colorectal cancers are within the five most common cancers males in all countries studied. In females, breast colorectal and endometrium cancers are three of the five most common cancers in females in all countries studied. The results presented in this paper can have implications for opportunities in cancer control and prevention in these countries. Future studies on individual cancer sites with highest rates in these Countries are currently underway.


Berkun L.,Technion - Israel Institute of Technology | Rabinowicz R.,Technion - Israel Institute of Technology | Barchana M.,Haifa University | Liphshiz I.,Israel National Cancer Registry | And 5 more authors.
Pediatric Blood and Cancer | Year: 2013

Purpose: Our goal was to describe adolescent cancer incidence and survival in Israel, and to identify demographic and epidemiologic variations among adolescents with cancer. Patients and Methods: We used data from the Israel National Cancer Registry in order to examine the incidence and survival of adolescent cancer in Israeli adolescents aged 15-19 years, diagnosed during the years 1998-2009. Cases were analyzed according to sex, ethnicity and geographical region, as well as comparison to other countries in the region and other western countries. Results: Among the 1,532 new cases of adolescent cancer, there was a total incidence rate of 226 cases per million. The incidence rate for males was higher than for females (230 and 222, respectively) and higher for Jewish adolescents than for Arab adolescents (235 and 194, respectively). The largest groups were Lymphomas (69 per million), Malignant Epithelial Neoplasms (49 per million), and Leukemias (21 per million). We estimated the survival probability updated to December 2009, and calculated the 5-year survival for new cases until the end of 2004. The overall survival at 5 years was 78%, with 62% for the Arabic population and 81% for the Jewish population, dependent on the diagnosis. Conclusions: The results of this study show little difference in the predominance of some adolescent cancers in comparison with other developed countries. This study may add more information for further investigation of the genetic and environmental factors that cause adolescent cancer in Israel. As well as delineate the genetic basis for ethnic origin disparities in survival. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2013;60:1848-1854. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Rabinowicz R.,Schneider Childrens Medical Center | Barchana M.,Haifa University | Liphshiz I.,Israel National Cancer Registry | Linn S.,Epidemiology Unit | And 4 more authors.
Pediatric Hematology and Oncology | Year: 2013

Cancer during the first year of life is relatively rare and often has clinical and biological properties different from those of the same histologic type of cancer occurring in older children. The aim of this study was to find differences in epidemiology and survival between infants and older children and to compare the percentage of distribution of infant cancer types in Israel with that reported in the United States. We collected infant <1 year of age cases diagnosed between 1998 and 2007 as having cancer from the database of the Israel National Cancer Registry, a total of 309 cases with an incidence rate of 228.5 cases per million. The largest group was diagnosed with neuroblastoma (35%) with an incident rate of 80 per million, followed by leukemia (15.9%), with acute lymphoid leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia accounting for most of this group and central nervous system malignancies comprised 10.7% of infant cancer. One hundred and fifty four new cases of infant girls was diagnosed compared to 155 infant boys with an incidence rates of 234 cases per million for girls and 224.7 for boys, not statistically significant (F:M rate ratio of 1.04). The 5-year survival rates seen in the different groups were leukemia: 55.3%, lymphoma: 71%, CNS tumors: 53.3%, neuroblastoma: 93.4%, retinoblastoma: 94.7% renal tumors: 90.9%, hepatic tumors: 63.3%, soft tissue sarcoma: 76.2%, germ cell neoplasms: 83.3%, and other epithelial neoplasms: 100%. Our study did not find survival differences with statistical significance upon comparing survival rates between different genders and ethnic groups. Copyright © Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.


Rabinowicz R.,Technion - Israel Institute of Technology | Barchana M.,Haifa University | Liphshiz I.,Israel National Cancer Registry | Futerman B.,Meyer Childrens Hospital | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology | Year: 2012

Our goal was to describe childhood cancer incidence and survival in Israel and to identify demographic and epidemiologic variations among children and adolescents with cancer. We used data from the Israel National Cancer Registry to examine the incidence and survival of pediatric cancer in Israeli children aged 0 to 19 years, diagnosed during the years 1998 to 2007. Cases were analyzed according to sex, age, ethnicity, and geographic region. Among the 4255 cases of childhood cancer, there was a total age-adjusted incidence rate of 172.4 per million for children aged 0 to 19 years and 153.4 per million for children aged 0 to 14 years. The incidence rate for boys was higher than for girls (192.5 and 153.3, respectively) and higher for Jewish children than for Arab children (177.6 and 156.8, respectively). The largest groups were leukemias (22%), lymphomas (20.2%), and central nervous system tumors (17.4%). The number of new cases increased each year, but the incidence rate remained steady. The survival probability updated to December 2008 was estimated and the 5-year survival was calculated for the new cases until the end of 2003. The overall survival at 5 years was 80.8%, with 72.8% for the Arabic population and 83.2% for the Jewish population, and depended on the diagnosis. Incidence and survival in childhood cancer in Israel is at the same medium level compared with other parts of the world. This study may set the basis for investigating the genetic and environmental factors that cause pediatric cancer in Israel, delineating the genetic basis for ethnic origin disparities in survival. Copyright © 2012 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

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