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Luna G.M.,Marche Polytechnic University | Dell'Anno A.,Marche Polytechnic University | Pietrangeli B.,National Institute of Occupational Safety and Prevention ex ISPESL INAIL | Danovaro R.,Marche Polytechnic University
Journal of Biotechnology | Year: 2012

Harbour sediments are periodically subjected to dredging operations and their management is mainly based on the assessment of the chemical contamination levels, but the potential risks posed by the presence of pathogenic microorganisms have been largely neglected. Here we first developed new molecular protocols based on the use of Real Time Quantitative PCR (qPCR), targeting both bacterial DNA and the transcription product (rRNA), for the identification and quantification of bacteria of fecal origin (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp. and Salmonella spp.) in contaminated harbour sediments. Then, we assessed the effects of bioremediation treatments, conventionally utilized for abating the hydrocarbon contamination in the sediment, on the abundance of fecal bacteria (FB). The qPCR technique was highly specific, sensitive and reproducible, and detected a number of fecal bacteria significantly higher than the classical cultivation techniques. Sediments subjected to bioremediation experiments by biostimulation with inorganic nutrients at different temperatures displayed a significant increase of the abundance of E. coli and Enterococcus spp. These findings suggest the risk of a potential increase of the contamination by pathogenic microorganisms of fecal origin during bioremediation and, as such, highlight the importance of careful monitoring this biological component in harbour sediments when subjected to bio-treatments. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.


Baric M.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Pierro L.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Pietrangeli B.,National Institute of Occupational Safety and Prevention ex ISPESL INAIL | Papini M.P.,National Institute of Occupational Safety and Prevention ex ISPESL INAIL
New Biotechnology | Year: 2014

During the last two decades permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) established as robust alternatives to traditional pump & treat approaches for groundwater remediation. Zero-valent iron (ZVI) is currently the most frequently employed reactive media, especially for treating plumes polluted by chlorinated hydrocarbons. However PRB-ZVI technology is affected by some problems such as the long-term performance decrease, loss of porosity and no applicability to some important compounds, such as 1,2-dichloroetane (1,2-DCA). In this study we wanted to investigate whether the coupling of ZVI with a long-lasting slow-release substrate (i.e. poly-hydroxybutyrate, PHB) could be a strategy to enhance the degradation performance of ZVI barriers towards chlorinated ethanes especially stimulating biological reductive dechlorination downgradient the PRB. Results here presented clearly demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach and the possibility that a biodegradable polymer, usually produced for different commercial sectors, could be advantageously used in the groundwater remediation market. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | University of Rome La Sapienza and National Institute of Occupational Safety and Prevention ex ISPESL INAIL
Type: Journal Article | Journal: New biotechnology | Year: 2014

During the last two decades permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) established as robust alternatives to traditional pump & treat approaches for groundwater remediation. Zero-valent iron (ZVI) is currently the most frequently employed reactive media, especially for treating plumes polluted by chlorinated hydrocarbons. However PRB-ZVI technology is affected by some problems such as the long-term performance decrease, loss of porosity and no applicability to some important compounds, such as 1,2-dichloroetane (1,2-DCA). In this study we wanted to investigate whether the coupling of ZVI with a long-lasting slow-release substrate (i.e. poly-hydroxybutyrate, PHB) could be a strategy to enhance the degradation performance of ZVI barriers towards chlorinated ethanes especially stimulating biological reductive dechlorination downgradient the PRB. Results here presented clearly demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach and the possibility that a biodegradable polymer, usually produced for different commercial sectors, could be advantageously used in the groundwater remediation market.

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