Islamiah College Autonomous Vaniyambadi

Tamilnadu, India

Islamiah College Autonomous Vaniyambadi

Tamilnadu, India
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Manigandan M.,Islamiah College Autonomous Vaniyambadi | Syed Muzammil M.,Islamiah College Autonomous Vaniyambadi
International Journal of PharmTech Research | Year: 2013

Medicinal plants have been considered as important therapeutic aid for alleviating ailments of man kind. In spite of tremendous development in the field of allopathy. Medicinal plants and their derivatives still remain one of the major roles in medicinal therapy. The world's health organization also has recognized the important of traditional medicine and has been active in creating strategies guidelines and standard for botanical medicines. Sesbania grandiflora Linn belongs to the family Leguminosae and has been widely used in Ayurveda. Agati is a widely available, fast growing plant, generally popular for animal fodder. The plants parts used are Root, Bark, Leaf, Flower and Fruit. Sesbania grandiflora known as agati, syn. Aeschynomene grandiflora or hummingbird tree/scarlet wisteria is a small tree in the genus Sesbania, commonly it is known as caturay, katurai, Chamorro, corkwood tree, scarlet wisteria, sesban, vegetable hummingbird in English, agathi, in Tamil, hadga in hindi. In Ayurveda the plant has been used for the treatment of head ache, for fever1,2as tonic, in cataract and as astringent. The leaves of the plant have been reported to have anxiolytic3-9and anticonvulsant effect while the flowers have been reported to have antimicrobial activity10, hypolipidemic, antiulcer11and anti-inflammatory effects. In view of the above considerations the present study was designed to investigate the antibacterial activity of ethanolic root extract of Sesbania grandiflora.


Syed Muzammil M.,Islamiah College Autonomous Vaniyambadi | Maboop Rahiman S.,Islamiah College Autonomous Vaniyambadi | Karthik V.,Islamiah College Autonomous Vaniyambadi | Dinesh V.,Islamiah College Autonomous Vaniyambadi | And 5 more authors.
International Journal of PharmTech Research | Year: 2013

The present investigation is part of continuing programme related to the phytochemical screening of Aegle marmelos and effect of antibiotics mixing with the Aegle marmelos (herbal extracts) their enhanced potential on microbes. In the world the local plants used in Ancient Indian Medicine, Ayurveda, Siddha and Yunani, in several countries including India several plant species are administered orally to control the various diseases. Some of these plants have been pharmacologically provided to be of some value and may be a popular remedy for the treatment of disease. From the very beginning of human existence, man has familiarized himself with medicinal plants and used them in a variety of ways throughout the ages. In search of food and to cope successfully with human suffering, primitive man began to distinguish those plants suitable for nutritional purpose from others with definitive pharmacological action. This relationship has grown between plants and man, and many plants came to be used as drugs. The growth of knowledge to cure disease continues at an accelerating pace, and number of new plant-derived drugs increase likewise. Herbal medicine is currently experiencing a revival in Western society, along with other complementary therapies such as traditional Chinese Medicines, Osteopathy and Homeopathy. In this context, the present study is the first milestone with particular emphasis on the application of Aegle marmelos the medicinal plant and their effect in mixing with antibiotics for their better formulation and controlling the various diseases in near future.

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