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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.nature.com

The spliceosome converts from branching to exon ligation through the ATP-dependent activity of Prp16, a DEAH box helicase8. Prp16 action destabilizes the branching factors Cwc25 and Yju2 (refs 4,9) and creates strong binding sites for the exon ligation factors Slu7 and Prp18 (refs 10,11), while promoting 3′ exon docking7. These factors are essential for splicing of pre-mRNAs with long distances between the branch point and the 3′ splice site12 and for correct 3′ splice site selection13, but their precise roles are unknown. To understand the mechanism of Prp16-mediated spliceosomal remodelling, we assembled spliceosomes in S. cerevisiae extracts on a pre-mRNA substrate containing a deoxy-guanosine at the 3′ splice site UAG sequence and purified them via an affinity-tag on Slu7 (Methods). With this substrate the spliceosomes stall after Prp16-dependent remodelling and before exon ligation, forming the C* complex14; thus purified spliceosomes contain predominantly lariat intermediates (Extended Data Fig. 1). We obtained a cryoEM reconstruction of C* complex at a resolution of 3.8 Å (Extended Data Figs 1, 2), into which we modelled 40 components (Extended Data Tables 1, 2, Extended Data Figs 3, 4 and Supplementary Information). Prp8, Snu114 and the U5 Sm core domain form the foot domain in both C* and C complexes (Fig. 1), which functions as an assembly platform for most of the Prp19 complex (NTC) and Prp19-related (NTR) components including Cwc2, Bud31 and Ecm2. The N-terminal end of Clf1 is anchored by Cef1, Syf2 and the U2/U6 snRNAs exiting the active site (Fig. 1b). The HAT repeats of Clf1 and Syf1 together form a large arch which is rotated considerably in C* relative to the C complex. The N-terminal end of Syf1 interacts with the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP), therefore this rotation disrupts the interface between the Prp8 RNase H-like (RH) domain and the U2 snRNP observed in C complex. Consequently, the Prp8 RH domain rotates inward (Extended Data Fig. 5) and the Prp17 WD40 domain moves into the body of the complex. U2 stem IIc swings outwards and no longer interacts with Cwc2/Ecm2 (Extended Data Fig. 5). Unlike in the C complex, no density is visible for Brr2. The RNA structure in the core of the spliceosome remains remarkably unchanged during the C to C* transition, with the exception of the branch helix (Fig. 2a, b). The U2/U6 catalytic triplex adopts the same configuration as in the C complex, consistent with biochemical and genetic evidence15. Density consistent with the presence of Mg2+ ions is observed adjacent to the phosphate oxygen ligands for catalytic metal ions M1 and M2 identified by metal rescue studies (Extended Data Fig. 6), providing further evidence for a single active site for both catalytic steps2. As in the C complex, the 5′ exon is base-paired with loop 1 of U5 snRNA in agreement with genetic analysis and crosslinking experiments16, 17, and the 3′-OH of the last 5′-exon nucleotide (G(−1)) lies close to the M1 site and is ready to act as a nucleophile for the incoming 3′ splice site (Fig. 2c, Extended Data Fig. 6). Prp16-induced remodelling results in a dramatic rotation of the branch helix by approximately 75° around the hinge at A30 of U2 snRNA (Fig. 2b). The branch point moves away from the catalytic centre (approximately 20 Å), creating sufficient space for the 3′ splice site to dock at the catalytic Mg2+ site (Fig. 2a, c). This movement disrupts the non-Watson–Crick interactions of the branch point adenosine (A70) with the branch helix4 and reorganizes the interactions of the 5′ splice site with the U6 snRNA ACAGAGA sequence (Fig. 2d, e). The A70 base is packed against the ribose of the first intron nucleotide G(+1), while the G(+1) base stacks with the base of U(+2). In the C complex, U(+2) forms a base triple with G37 of U2 snRNA and C67 of the intron4, 5 whereas in the C* complex U(+2) forms a non-canonical base-pair with A51 of U6 snRNA (Fig. 2d, e), consistent with crosslinking in human spliceosomes17. Notably, mutations at both U(+2) and A51 impair exon ligation18, 19. Indeed, in group II introns the nucleotide equivalent to A51 (adjacent to the two nucleotides involved in triplex formation) base-pairs with the last nucleotide of the intron (γ–γ′ interaction)20. Thus A51 and intron U(+2) may interact with the last nucleotide G(−1) of the intron. It is noteworthy that all three positions (A70, G(+1), U(+2)/A51), whose mutations lead to second step defects, are aligned towards the active site, strongly suggesting a path for the 3′ splice site (Fig. 2c). Finally, the Hoogsteen base-pair between A(+3) of the intron and G50 of U6 snRNA (Fig. 2e) no longer forms in C* (Fig. 2d), consistent with genetic evidence that this interaction must be disrupted during the Prp16 rearrangement21. The proteins common to both C and C* restrain the catalytic RNA core (U6 snRNA ISL and helices Ia and Ib) onto Prp8, whereas the branch helix rotates substantially between the two states (Fig. 2b). In the C complex, the branch helix is locked into the branching conformation predominantly by Cwc25, Yju2 and Isy1, such that A70 is inserted into the catalytic centre4, 5 (Fig. 3a, b). After branching, Prp16 promotes dissociation of Cwc25, Yju2 and Isy1 and binding of Prp18, Slu7 and Prp22. In the C complex the U2 Sm core domain interacts with the RH domain4, 5 but this interaction is disrupted completely in the C* complex when Prp17 wedges between the U2 Sm ring and the Prp8 RH domain (Fig. 3a, Extended Data Fig. 5). In the C* complex, the RH domain of Prp8 is rotated by about 80° with respect to the large domain (Extended Data Fig. 5d, e). In this orientation, the β-finger of the RH domain crosses the minor groove of the branch helix and reaches Cef1 (Fig. 3a, d). Prp17 binds across the interface between the β-finger and Cef1, stabilizing this interaction. A long α-helix bridges the Prp8 RH domain and the Cef1 Myb domain and reaches the C terminus of Syf1 (Fig. 3c). The direction and sequence of this helix are uncertain from the current map. These interactions lock the branch helix in a conformation predisposed for exon ligation. Prp17 and the rotated position of the RH domain observed in C* would clash with Isy1 and Cwc25, explaining how Prp16-dependent dissociation of Isy1 enables the RH domain to rotate, promoting the exon-ligation configuration. Consistently, deletion of Isy1 suppresses a Prp16 mutation that impairs remodelling of the spliceosome22. The helical domain23 of Prp18 is bound to the Prp8 RH domain opposite from the branch helix binding face (Fig. 3a). Slu7 meanders from the binding site of its predicted globular region towards the foot of the complex, interacts with Prp18, and latches the RH domain onto the endonuclease domain of Prp8, thus stabilizing the rotated conformation of the RH domain and the binding of Prp18 in C* (Extended Data Fig. 7). Indeed, the region of Slu7 that binds the RH domain is essential for yeast viability24. Our C* complex structure provides important insight into the organization of the active site during exon ligation even though the 3′ exon is not yet docked. As discussed above the rotation of the branch helix not only creates a space for the 3′ exon at the catalytic metal binding site but also reorganizes the interaction between the U6 snRNA ACAGAGA sequence and the 5′ end of the intron. An important outcome of Prp16 action is repositioning A51 of U6 snRNA so that it could position the 3′ splice site by interacting with the last nucleotide of the intron like the equivalent nucleotide in group II introns20 (Fig. 2c). If this is the case, it is possible that the penultimate nucleotide A(−2) and its preceding nucleotide Y(−3) may also interact with the first intron nucleotide G(+1) and the branch point adenosine (A70). An interaction between the 3′ splice site UAG sequence, the ACAGAGA sequence and the 5′ splice site intron sequence for exon-ligation has been suggested previously19. However, mutational studies of the 5′ splice site and 3′ splice site have not led to a clear base-pairing scheme19, 25 suggesting that these interactions may involve non-canonical base pairing. The base pairing between the 5′ exon and loop 1 of U5 snRNA (Fig. 2c) places the 3′-OH group of the 5′ exon close to M1 such that it can act as a nucleophile when the phosphate group at the 3′ splice site is bound to M1 and M2 (Extended Data Fig. 6; refs 2,26). Slu7 and Prp18 are dispensable for exon ligation when the distance between the branch point and the 3′ splice site is less than nine nucleotides11. Notably, in our structure, three nucleotides of the intron downstream of the branch point are visible and an additional six nucleotides would be sufficient to fold back and reach the catalytic Mg2+ site (Extended Data Fig. 8; ref. 12). When the distance to the 3′ splice site is less than nine nucleotides, the 3′ splice site could easily reach the catalytic centre and allow the 3′ exon to dock. When the distance is much greater, the entropic cost of docking the 3′ exon would be greater and Slu7 and Prp18 could become indispensable in guiding the path of the intron (Extended Data Fig. 8). Indeed, mutation of Slu7 impairs splicing at distal 3′ splice sites without affecting proximal 3′ splice sites, when two competing sites are present13, 27. The DEAH ATPase Prp22, which promotes exon ligation7, 28, binds on top of the Prp8 large domain (Fig. 4a) near where Prp16 binds in the C complex, consistent with a mutually exclusive interaction with the spliceosome10. Compared to the crystal structure of the homologous Prp43 ATPase in the ADP–Mg-bound form29, Prp22 in our C* complex is in an open conformation with a wider separation of the RecA1 and RecA2 domains (Fig. 4b). Density attributable to RNA is present in the Prp22 active site (Fig. 4b) and Prp22 crosslinks 17 nucleotides downstream of the exon–exon junction6. Indeed, the distance between the catalytic centre of the spliceosome and Prp22 in our structure can be spanned with 16–17 nucleotides. Thus Prp22 could bind to the 3′ exon emerging from the core to promote mRNA release and dissociation of Slu7, Prp18 and Cwc22 after exon ligation. Our C* complex structure elucidates the structural consequences of Prp16 activity (Fig. 4c), reveals a large rotation of the branch helix which creates a space for 3′ exon docking at the catalytic centre in the exon ligation conformation of the spliceosome, and provides a structural framework for investigating 3′ splice site selection and ligated exon release.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Wise Marketer Group, which provides loyalty marketing news, research and education to marketing professionals worldwide, announced today a sponsorship and content marketing agreement with Reward Paths, a customer loyalty solutions enterprise serving the U.S., Canadian and Caribbean rewards, loyalty and incentive solutions marketplace. Reward Paths and its parent company, Incentive Solutions Ltd (ISL), Auckland, New Zealand, designs, operates and technically enables loyalty and incentive programs in both the consumer and B2B marketing arenas. The combined entities currently operate in the US, Canada, Jamaica, New Zealand and Australia markets. The marketing agreement will enable both Reward Paths and ISL to become a primary sponsor of the B2B loyalty “channel” at The Wise Marketer and deliver loyalty marketing educational courses through The Loyalty Academy. Reward Paths offers clients proven program design, operations and rewards expertise, enabled by affordable, best-in-class technology that has been previously unavailable to mid-market clients, especially in the B2B sector. According to David Harwood, CEO of Reward Paths, the partnership will enhance collaboration with marketing executives from companies and brands worldwide on research, intelligence and best practices to improve the results of B2B loyalty programs. “At Reward Paths and ISL, we intend to play a lead role in creating and shaping new directions that B2B loyalty programs and strategies will be taking in the next few years, change that is demanded by swift moving market, technology and cultural forces. The new Wise Marketer's focus on re-invigorating loyalty thought leadership and practitioner excellence makes them a natural partner for us in that effort," Harwood said. "We're excited to see the Wise Marketer bring a focus that has been missing from the market in terms of developing loyalty expertise as a professional goal for new marketers. Beyond the value of the Wise Marketer as a go-to loyalty publication, we strongly support the value of their newly launched Loyalty Academy as a training source and annual event to help grow the next generation of loyalty professionals," he said. Wise Marketer Group Chief Executive and Editor-in-Chief Rick Ferguson is leading the creation of a forward-looking vision for the group and stated, “The brands that sponsor loyalty programs and the organizations providing thought leadership, technology and creative support to enable program success share common interests. We are proud to announce Reward Paths as a founding sponsor and look forward to working together to develop an industry resource that every executive in this industry will consider a must-have tool to stay abreast of this dynamic industry." Added Harwood, “We have significant experience in New Zealand and Australia about what works and why, especially in B2B and consumer coalition programs. We have engineered our North American business around similar concepts. While some cultural and market adjustments are always required, the reward and recognition foundation we have established means that all mid-market industries with any interest in a loyalty or rewards solution will benefit greatly.” About Reward Paths, LLC Reward Paths is a full service Marketing firm specializing in helping mid-market companies design, enable and operate reward, loyalty and incentive programs for their customers and associates. Reward Paths offers affordable, best of breed technology especially well suited to the business-to-business marketplace and operates the world’s first web resource devoted to B2B loyalty information at http://www.b2bloyaltyguide.com/. The company also provides reward program services to mid-market clients and coalitions serving consumer markets. Reward Paths LLC is majority owned by a subsidiary of Incentive Solutions Limited (ISL) of Auckland, New Zealand. For more information visit [http://www.rewardpaths.com. About The Wise Marketer Group The Wise Marketer Group delivers timely and unbiased publishing, research, and educational products to a global audience of marketing professionals. In addition to publishing the Wise Marketer, the Wise Marketer Group also operates the Loyalty Academy (http://www.loyaltyacademy.org), the premiere global education and membership organization for loyalty marketing practitioners, and publishes the Loyalty Guide (http://www.loyaltyguide.com), now in its 7th edition, which offers over 1,400 pages of unrivaled customer loyalty and marketing intelligence for marketing leaders. The Wise Marketer also hosts the annual Loyalty Academy Conference, scheduled for March 2, 2017 at the Marriott Harbor Beach Resort and Spa in Ft. Lauderdale, FL.


SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 16, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Medicalis, a leading provider of Imaging Service Line (ISL) Solutions, announced today that Medical Diagnostic Imaging Group (MDIG), one of the largest multi-state radiology reading groups headquartered in Arizona, has deployed the Medicalis...


News Article | December 9, 2016
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« JISEA: nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems can reduce GHG from industry, produce fuels and support the power system | Main | Honeywell Transportation Systems Forecast: turbocharged vehicles to account for 48% of annual global sales by 2021; electric boosting emerges » Cummins Westport’s ISB6.7 G, a 6.7 liter midrange, factory-built natural gas engine is now fully available as a production engine for shuttle bus, medium duty truck, and vocational applications in North America. (Earlier post.) As previously announced, the engine has been available for school bus applications since May 2016 from Thomas Built Buses. The 6.7 liter engine platform has large OEM availability for midrange trucks, vocational trucks and mid size buses and the expansion of applications potentially available for the ISB6.7 G engine more than doubles its addressable market. The ISB6.7 G is based on the Cummins ISB6.7 diesel engine platform, the industry leader in the Cummins midrange engine family, and operates exclusively on natural gas, including compressed, liquid, or renewable natural gas (RNG). The ISB6.7 G is the second engine from Cummins Westport (CWI) to receive emission certification from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Air Resources Board (ARB) in California for meeting the Optional Low NO Emissions standards. An engine of this size is a natural addition to CWI’s portfolio of natural gas engines. Many customers using school and shuttle buses, medium duty trucks, or vocational vehicles operate within a local area where the return to base nature of their operation allows them to use fleet-owned or growing publicly available natural gas fueling infrastructure. The ISB6.7 G offers the midrange customer an ability to take advantage of the most cost effective overall solution with the benefit of a low emission natural gas engine that has proven performance, reliability, and durability. In addition, operating on RNG offers customers a tremendous greenhouse gas savings opportunity versus fossil fuels. The ISB6.7 G features the same advanced combustion controls with Three-Way Catalyst (TWC) as Cummins Westport’s ISL G & ISX12 G engines. NO emissions of the ISB6.7 G are 0.1 g/bhp-hr—50% lower than the current EPA and ARB NO limit of 0.2 g/bhp-hr. CO emissions meet the 2017 EPA greenhouse gas (GHG) emission requirements. All CWI natural gas engines are lower than the 2010 EPA standard for particulate matter (0.01 g/bhp-hr). The ISB6.7 G utilizes CWI proprietary spark-ignited, stoichiometric combustion with cooled exhaust gas recirculation (SEGR) technology. It features electronic control with programmable features, a closed crankcase ventilation system, and maintenance-free three-way catalyst aftertreatment. No diesel particulate filter or selective catalytic reduction aftertreatment is required. The SEGR technology was introduced with the ISL G in 2007, and was developed to meet 2010 EPA emission requirements. The cooled-EGR system passes exhaust gas through a cooler to reduce temperatures before mixing it with fuel and the incoming air charge to the cylinder. Stoichiometric combustion in combination with cooled-EGR offers increased power density and thermal efficiency. It also reduces in-cylinder combustion temperatures and creates an oxygen-free exhaust, which then enables the use of a three-way catalyst (TWC) for NO control. The ISB6.7 G will be manufactured in the Cummins engine plant and offered in three ratings up to 240 hp (179 kW) and 560 lb-ft (759 N·m) torque. Power Take-Off and automatic transmission capability meet customer and original equipment manufacturer requirements. Base warranty is two years, with unlimited miles/kilometers. Extended Coverage options are also available. Partial funding in support of the ISB6.7 G engine development has been received from the California Energy Commission through its Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program in conjunction with the Gas Technology Institute.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA--(Marketwired - Feb. 24, 2017) - Copper Fox Metals Inc. ("Copper Fox" or the "Company") (TSX VENTURE:CUU)(OTC PINK:CPFXF) is pleased to announce that its audited consolidated October 31, 2016 financial statements have been filed on SEDAR. All of the Company's material subsidiaries are wholly owned, except for Carmax Mining Corp. ("Carmax") (TSX VENTURE:CXM), of which the Company owns 65.4% of the outstanding common shares. These audited consolidated financial statements include 100% of the assets and liabilities related to Carmax and include a non-controlling interest portion, representing 34.6% of Carmax's assets and liabilities that are not owned by the Company. For the year ended October 31, 2016, Copper Fox had a comprehensive loss of $784,363 (October 31, 2015 - $20,215) which equated to $0.00 loss per share (October 31, 2015 - $0.00). During the fiscal year ended, the Company incurred $477,945 in expenditures toward furthering the development of its Van Dyke, Sombrero Butte, and Mineral Mountain copper projects in Arizona. Copies of the financial statements, notes, and related management discussion and analysis may be obtained on SEDAR at www.sedar.com, the Company's web site at www.copperfoxmetals.com or by contacting the Company directly. All references to planned activities and technical information contained in this news release have been previously announced by way of news releases. All amounts are expressed in Canadian dollars unless otherwise stated. Elmer B. Stewart, President and CEO of Copper Fox stated, "In 2016, Copper Fox achieved positive technical results on all five of its projects, while considerably reducing its general and administrative expenses. At Schaft Creek, the joint venture completed a geological model and commenced updating the Schaft Creek deposit resource model, in addition to other project related activities. The Preliminary Economic Assessment ("PEA") of the Van Dyke project indicated that the anticipated costs to produce a pound of copper is in the first quartile for global copper costs, identified a number of economic enhancements, and recommended the completion of a pre-feasibility study. The Mineral Mountain, Sombrero Butte, and Eaglehead (Carmax) projects were all advanced technically during the fiscal year ended 2016, and all yielded positive results. One potential issue that arose during the fiscal year ended 2016 was Carmax's ownership of its Eaglehead mineral tenures. This issue has been heard by the courts and the Company is now awaiting a decision. Until said decision is rendered, Carmax's ownership of the Eaglehead mineral claim tenures remains in doubt. Going into 2017, Copper Fox will continue its strategy adopted in 2016, which is to focus on advancing its projects through exploration and development." Elmer B. Stewart, MSc. P. Geol., President of Copper Fox, is the Company's non-independent, nominated Qualified Person pursuant to National Instrument 43-101, Standards for Disclosure for Mineral Projects, and has reviewed and approves the scientific and technical information disclosed in this news release. As at October 31, 2016, the Company had $847,505 in cash (October 31, 2015 - $1,529,138). Copper Fox is a Tier 1 Canadian resource company listed on the TSX Venture Exchange (TSX VENTURE:CUU) focused on copper exploration and development in Canada and the United States. Copper Fox and its wholly owned Canadian and United States subsidiaries, being Desert Fox Copper Inc. and Northern Fox Copper Inc., hold the five primary assets listed below: On behalf of the Board of Directors, Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release. This news release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and forward-looking information within the meaning of the Canadian securities laws (collectively, "forward-looking information"). Forward-looking information in this news release include statements about the anticipated costs to produce a pound of copper at the Van Dyke project; focusing on advancing the Company's projects through exploration and development; a $0.9 million budget for the 2017 Schaft Creek Joint Venture program, including completion of the resource remodeling, desktop engineering and trade-off studies, collection of baseline environmental data, and an application for a MYAB permit; approval of the MYAB permit and the underlying activities; projections for the Van Dyke In-Situ Leach ("ISL") copper project to have low cash costs (first quartile) per pound of copper produced, strong cash flows and a pre-tax Net Present Value ("NPV") of US $213.1 million, coupled with an Internal Rate of Return ("IRR") of 35.5%; and a cost of approximately US $425,000 to obtain the main permits for the ISL test. In connection with the forward-looking information contained in this news release, Copper Fox and its subsidiaries have made numerous assumptions regarding, among other things: the geological, financial and economic advice that Copper Fox has received is reliable and is based upon practices and methodologies which are consistent with industry standards; and the stability of economic and market conditions. While Copper Fox considers these assumptions to be reasonable, these assumptions are inherently subject to significant uncertainties and contingencies. Additionally, there are known and unknown risk factors which could cause Copper Fox's actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking information contained herein. Known risk factors include, among others: exploration of the projects may not find copper mineralization in significant quantities or at all, or at the expected cost; the overall economy may deteriorate; uncertainty as to the availability and terms of future financing; copper prices and demand may fluctuate; currency exchange rates may fluctuate; conditions in the financial markets may deteriorate; and uncertainty as to timely availability of permits and other governmental approvals. A more complete discussion of the risks and uncertainties facing Copper Fox is disclosed in Copper Fox's continuous disclosure filings with Canadian securities regulatory authorities at www.sedar.com. All forward-looking information herein is qualified in its entirety by this cautionary statement, and Copper Fox disclaims any obligation to revise or update any such forward-looking information or to publicly announce the result of any revisions to any of the forward-looking information contained herein to reflect future results, events or developments, except as required by law.


News Article | August 22, 2016
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« Dahn team develops ethylene-carbonate-free electrolytes for better-performing high-voltage Li-ion cells | Main | New Flyer adds 2016 Cummins Westport ISL G Near Zero engine to Xcelsior bus lineup; debuting in LA » The Institute for Advanced Composites Manufacturing Innovation, IACMI, in partnership with DuPont Performance Materials, Fibrtec Inc. and Purdue University, has launched the first project selected with a dual focus on decreasing the cost of manufacture and increasing design flexibility for automotive composites. Advancements in both areas can open up new opportunities and become an enabler for large-scale deployment of composite parts. Multiple factors, including cost and design constraints, present barriers to the adoption of composites in high volume automotive applications. This new IACMI project will address both of these critical areas through a fundamentally different approach to the manufacturing of carbon fiber composites versus those currently in use today. The work will build on synergies of differentiated technologies, including novel materials and processes that allow flexible pre-pregs (Fiberflex) combined with Rapid Fabric Formation (RFF) technology to provide customizable fiber orientations via thermal bonding to significantly improve cycle time, cost, and waste. The final component will benefit from increased production speeds of the tow manufacturing process and the fabric forming process resulting in a lower cost of manufacture. The partners have estimated that use of emerging materials for impregnation and new approaches for tow coating and fabric formation will lower costs of high volume composites production by 20%. Composite parts made by this process have been shown to have low voids and good mechanical properties when consolidated by traditional techniques. The flexible fabric prepregs have also been shown to have good draping behavior in molding experiments. Researchers in the Purdue University Composites Manufacturing and Simulation Center will work with the team to model and validate drapability and part performance. High cycle time for production of continuous carbon fiber thermoplastic composites increases costs. The use of emerging materials for impregnation and new approaches for tow coating and fabric formation are expected to significantly lower production costs of high volume composites. The Institute for Advanced Composites Manufacturing Innovation (IACMI), managed by the Collaborative Composite Solutions Corporation (CCS), is a partnership of industry, universities, national laboratories, and federal, state and local governments working together to accelerate development and commercial deployment of advanced composites. CCS is a not-for-profit organization established by The University of Tennessee Research Foundation. The national institute is supported by a $70-million commitment from the US Department of Energy’s Advanced Manufacturing Office and more than $180 million committed from IACMI’s partners.


News Article | August 22, 2016
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« New Flyer adds 2016 Cummins Westport ISL G Near Zero engine to Xcelsior bus lineup; debuting in LA | Main | FEV North America, Inc. opening office in Silicon Valley » Energy-associated CO emissions from natural gas are expected to surpass those from coal for the first time since 1972, according to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA). Even though natural gas is less carbon-intensive than coal, increases in natural gas consumption and decreases in coal consumption in the past decade have resulted in natural gas-related CO emissions surpassing those from coal. EIA’s latest Short-Term Energy Outlook projects energy-related CO emissions from natural gas to be 10% greater than those from coal in 2016. From 1990 to about 2005, consumption of coal and natural gas in the United States was relatively similar, but their emissions were different; coal is more carbon-intensive than natural gas. The consumption of natural gas results in about 52 million metric tons of CO for every quadrillion British thermal units (MMmtCO /quad Btu), while coal’s carbon intensity is about 95 MMmtCO /quad Btu, or about 82% higher than natural gas’s carbon intensity. Because coal has a higher carbon intensity, even in a year when consumption of coal and natural gas were nearly equal, such as 2005, energy-related CO emissions from coal were about 84% higher than those from natural gas. In 2015, natural gas consumption was 81% higher than coal consumption, and their emissions were nearly equal. Both fuels were associated with about 1.5 billion metric tons of energy-related CO emissions in the United States in 2015.


« IACMI, DuPont and Purdue partner on automotive carbon-fiber composites | Main | EIA: energy-related CO2 emissions from natural gas surpass coal as fuel use patterns change » Flyer of America Inc., a subsidiary of New Flyer Industries Inc., the largest heavy-duty transit bus and motor coach manufacturer and parts distributor in North America, is adding the 2016 Cummins Westport ISL G Near Zero engine (earlier post) to its Xcelsior bus family. New Flyer is the first transit manufacturer to offer the industry’s cleanest certified engine and will deliver the first original OEM installation of a the engine in the third quarter of 2016. The ISL G NZ compressed natural gas is certified by both US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Air Resources Board (ARB) in California to meet the 0.02 g/bhp-hr optional Near Zero NO Emissions standards for medium-duty truck, urban bus, school bus and refuse applications. The engine will be used to power a New Flyer Xcelsior XN40 bus for the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LA Metro). LA Metro operates the largest natural gas engine transit vehicle fleet in North America. Cummins Westport states that this certification represents a 10-fold emissions reduction below current EPA NO emissions standards, making it the cleanest engine in the industry. Cummins Westport also describes the engine as operating 90% below the particulate matter (PM) standard, and 16% below the CO emissions standard. In addition to the significant reduction in NO , the ISL G NZ features Closed Crankcase Ventilation, stated to reduce engine related methane emissions by 70%, thereby enhancing its greenhouse gas benefits. The ISL G NZ is built off the current ISL G platform, but requires Closed Crankcase Ventilation (CCV); a larger maintenance-free Three-Way Catalyst (TWC); and a unique engine calibration. Performance and efficiency match the current ISL G, with engine ratings from 250-320 horsepower, and 660-1,000 lb-ft torque available. Base warranty, extended coverage options, maintenance procedures and service intervals are also the same as the current ISL G. The new engine has similar emission control systems (throttle body injection, TWC, EGR, etc.) as the 0.20 g/bhp-hr NO ISL G. We are proud to be the first OEM to factory install and deliver this industry-leading clean engine to a transit customer. New Flyer has delivered over 6,000 natural gas transit buses that operate to ranges of over 350 miles without refueling. The advancements of Cummins Westport in compressed natural gas internal combustion and after-treatment technology has helped our customers meet stringent clean air requirements, powered by low cost natural gas. Paul Smith, New Flyer’s Executive Vice President, Sales and Marketing, also noted the growing customer interest in renewable natural gas (RNG), also known as biomethane. RNG is chemically identical to fossil natural gas, and yields far fewer greenhouse emissions during the production process. RNG is a pipeline-quality gas that's fully interchangeable with conventional natural gas, yet can be produced by reusing waste products. It can be produced from landfills, livestock operations and wastewater treatment. Combining this renewable energy source with the Cummins Westport ISL G NZ engine provides a powerful tool to significantly improve urban air quality, while, at the same time, also reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Transit agencies now have more clean air, low greenhouse gas options than ever from New Flyer and can select from an array of propulsion systems that collectively meets their operational needs, all of which are available on the lightweight, industry proven, and reliable Xcelsior platform. In addition to CNG propulsion, New Flyer has the most comprehensive experience with electric propulsion in the industry, with more than 6,000 buses delivered using electric propulsion, ranging from electric-trolley, electric-hybrid, battery-electric and fuel cell-electric systems.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Integral Senior Living (ISL), a premier senior living management company, is always looking at new ways to innovate. Staying true to its mission, it created ISL Inspires, a program designed to give back to local communities in a variety of ways. Most recently, ISL Inspires took on the mission to engage corporate and community staff, residents, and family members to help raise money for Louisiana flood victims. In all the campaign raised $16,551.00 which was given to the non-profit organization Samaritans Purse to distribute the funds to victims. “As part of ISL Inspires, we challenged all our communities to take part and raise funds for the flood victims in Louisiana. Working together for a common cause and goal, we were humbled by not only the monetary support we received, but the enthusiasm from everyone involved in this wonderful effort,” said Collette Valentine, CEO/COO of ISL. ISL Inspires chose to assist residents of Louisiana who were victims of the devastating flood, which took place in August 2016. It was the worst US disaster since Hurricane Sandy. Thousands of people in Louisiana lost everything and help is needed, many did not imagine nor think they could become victims of a flood of this magnitude. The check for $16,551.00 was presented to a representative of Samaritans Purse at ISL’s Executive Director meeting recently held in New Orleans. About ISL Integral Senior Living headquartered in Carlsbad, CA, manages a progressive selection of senior residences to meet the growing needs of today’s aging population. It currently manages 59 independent, assisted living and memory care properties throughout Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Washington. It is ranked the 17th largest senior living provider in the U.S. according to Senior Housing News. ISL is founded on a care philosophy that fosters dignity and respect for residents and promotes their independence and individuality. The dedicated staff at each community is trained to maintain the highest standards of senior care services. For more information about ISL, visit Integral Senior Living’s website, blog and Facebook page.


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

PHILADELPHIA, Dec. 21, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Aberdeen Israel Fund, Inc. (NYSE MKT: ISL) (the "Fund"), a closed-end equity fund, announced today that it will pay a distribution of US$0.5514 per share on January 11, 2017 to all shareholders of record as of December 30, 2016.  This distri...

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