Isere Cancer Registry

Grenoble, France

Isere Cancer Registry

Grenoble, France

Time filter

Source Type

Bolla M.,Center Hospitalier University | Hannoun-Levi J.M.,Center Antoine Lacassagne | Ferrero J.-M.,Center Antoine Lacassagne | Maingon P.,Center Georges Franois Leclerc | And 7 more authors.
Radiotherapy and Oncology | Year: 2010

Background and purpose: We evaluate the feasibility of concomitant and adjuvant docetaxel combined with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and androgen deprivation in high-risk prostate carcinomas. Methods: Fifty men with high-risk localized prostate cancer (16), locally advanced (28) or very high-risk prostate cancer (6) were included. Seventy Gy were delivered on prostate and seminal vesicles in 35 fractions, concurrently with weekly docetaxel (20 mg/m2). Three weeks after the completion of 3D-CRT, docetaxel was given for 3 cycles (60 mg/m2), every 3 weeks. Patients had to receive LHRH agonist during 3 years. Results: The intent to treat analysis shows that four patients out of 15 stopped prematurely the chemotherapy due to grade 3-4 acute toxicity. In the per protocol analysis, 46 patients completed a full-dose chemoradiation regimen representing 413 cycles: five patients experienced a grade 3 toxicity, and 15 patients experienced a grade 2 toxicity. With a median follow-up of 54 months, the 5-year clinical disease-free survival was 66.72% and the 5-year survival was 92.15%. Conclusions: 3D-CRT with androgen deprivation and concurrent weekly docetaxel, followed by three cycles of adjuvant docetaxel may be considered as feasible in high-risk prostate cancer and deserved to be evaluated in a phase III randomized trial. © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.


Allemani C.,Fondazione IRCCS Instituto Nazionale dei Tumori | Storm H.,Danish Cancer Society | Voogd A.C.,Eindhoven Cancer Registry | Holli K.,University of Tampere | And 22 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2010

On a population-based sample of 13,500 European breast cancer patients mostly diagnosed in 1996-1998 and archived by 26 cancer registries, we used logistic regression to estimate odds of conservative surgery plus radiotherapy (BCS + RT) versus other surgery, in T1N0M0 cases by country, adjusted for age and tumour size. We also examined: BCS + RT in relation to total national expenditure on health (TNEH); chemotherapy use in N+ patients; tamoxifen use in oestrogen-positive patients; and whether ≥10 nodes were examined in lymphadenectomies. Stage, diagnostic examinations and treatments were obtained from clinical records. T1N0M0 cases were 33.0% of the total. 55.0% of T1N0M0 received BCS + RT, range 9.0% (Estonia) to 78.0% (France). Compared to France, odds of BCS + RT were lower in all other countries, even after adjusting for covariates. Women of 70-99 years had 67% lower odds of BCS + RT than women of 15-39 years. BCS + RT was 20% in low TNEH, 58% in medium TNEH, and 64% in high TNEH countries. Chemotherapy was given to 63.0% of N+ and 90.7% of premenopausal N+ (15-49 years), with marked variation by country, mainly in post-menopause (50-99 years). Hormonal therapy was given to 55.5% of oestrogen-positive cases, 44.6% at 15-49 years and 58.8% at 50-99 years; with marked variation across countries especially in premenopause. The variation in breast cancer care across Europe prior to the development of European guidelines was striking; older women received BCS + RT much less than younger women; and adherence to 'standard care' varied even among countries with medium/high TNEH, suggesting sub-optimal resource allocation. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Radoi L.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Radoi L.,University of Versailles | Paget-Bailly S.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Paget-Bailly S.,University of Versailles | And 20 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer Prevention | Year: 2013

The objective was to examine the role of tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking in the incidence of oral cavity cancer by subsite in France, a high-incidence area. We analysed detailed data on lifelong tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking from 772 oral cavity cancer cases and 3555 controls included in a population-based case-control study, the ICARE study. Tobacco smoking increased the risk of oral cavity cancer even for the smaller quantities and durations, whereas alcohol drinking increased this risk only in heavy drinkers who were also ever smokers. The combined effect of smoking and drinking was greater than multiplicative. The floor of the mouth was the subsite that was the most affected by the harmful effects of tobacco and alcohol, whereas the gums were less susceptible. The risk associated with tobacco and alcohol consumption did not differ between intraoral cavity and subsites usually included in the oropharynx (soft palate and base of the tongue). Population-attributable risks for oral cavity cancer were 78.6% for tobacco smoking, 7.3% for alcohol drinking and 80.7% for tobacco and/or alcohol consumption. These results indicate that regular oral check-ups should be targeted at smokers and heavy drinkers, and that prevention efforts should be focused on smoking cessation. © 2013 Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


PubMed | Isere Cancer Registry, University of Versailles, University Claude Bernard Lyon 1, University Paris - Sud and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Occupational and environmental medicine | Year: 2015

The objective of the study was to investigate the joint effect of occupational exposure to asbestos, and tobacco and alcohol consumption, on the risk of laryngeal cancer among men.We used data from a large population-based case-control study conducted in France. We estimated two-way and three-way interactions between asbestos exposure (never vs ever exposed), tobacco consumption (<20 vs. 20 pack-years) and alcohol consumption (<5 vs. 5 drinks per day). The interaction on an additive scale was assessed by estimating the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) and the attributable proportion due to interaction, and the interaction on a multiplicative scale was assessed by estimating the multiplicative interaction parameter (). Multiplicative interactions were also assessed using fractional polynomials for alcohol drinking, tobacco smoking and asbestos exposure.When compared with light-to-moderate smokers and drinkers never exposed to asbestos, the increase in laryngeal cancer risk was smallest among light-to-moderate drinkers and smokers exposed to asbestos (OR=2.23 (1.08 to 4.60)), and highest among heavy smokers and drinkers ever exposed to asbestos (OR=69.39 (35.54 to 135.5)). We found an additive joint effect between asbestos exposure and alcohol consumption (RERI=4.75 (-4.29 to 11.12)), whereas we observed a more than additive joint effect between asbestos exposure and tobacco consumption (RERI=8.50 (0.71 to 23.81)), as well as between asbestos exposure, and tobacco and alcohol consumption (RERI=26.57 (11.52 to 67.88)). However, our results did not suggest any interaction on a multiplicative scale.Our results suggest that asbestos exposure, in combination with tobacco and alcohol exposure, accounted for a substantial number of laryngeal cancer cases. Our findings therefore highlight the need for prevention in activities, such as construction work, where exposure to asbestos-containing materials remains.


Colonna M.,Isere Cancer Registry | Colonna M.,University of Monastir | Bossard N.,Hospices Civils de Lyon | Bossard N.,University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 | And 4 more authors.
International Journal of Cancer | Year: 2010

Cancer mortality in elderly people is described to highlight the mechanisms that could potentially explain observed differences with other age groups. Data from 15 French cancer registries were considered in the search for the 5-year outcome of patients diagnosed during the period 1989-1997. Relative survival, excess mortality hazard, and hazard ratio of mortality were estimated to describe patient outcome according to age. Five cancer sites were selected: colon/rectum, prostate, breast, head/neck, and lung. An excess mortality rate was found in patients aged over 75 at the time of diagnosis. This excess mortality rate was mainly seen during the first months after diagnosis, then it decreased gradually with time. An initial phenomenon of patient selection, a greater disease severity at the time of diagnosis, and less-effective treatments given to elderly patients are the most plausible explanations for the increased risk of cancer-related death in the eldest patients. © 2009 UICC.


Colonna M.,Isere Cancer Registry | Mitton N.,Isere Cancer Registry | Bossard N.,Service de Biostatistique | Bossard N.,University of Lyon | And 7 more authors.
BMC Cancer | Year: 2015

Background: To provide estimations of partial and total prevalence of 24 cancer sites in France in 2008. The estimations of partial prevalence were compared with the previous estimations for 2002. Methods: Nationwide estimations of incidence and survival data from cancer registries were used for partial prevalence. Nationwide incidence and mortality data were used to estimate total prevalence. Results: At the end of 2008, in France, nearly 3 million people still alive had received a diagnosis of cancer. Of all prevalent cases, 36% were diagnosed 0 to 5 years earlier and 43% diagnosed 6 to 10 years earlier. The cancer sites with the highest prevalence were the prostate, the breast, and the colon-rectum. The changes in partial prevalence over 5 years (2002 to 2008) were considerable (+244,000 cases) and deemed to be highly related to changes in incidence. Conclusion: The present estimations update the French prevalence data and highlight the burden of cancer in the population, especially in the elderly. The methods of this study had the advantage of using recent incidence and survival data, which is necessary to show sudden changes in incidence trends and changes in survival that impact prevalence. © Colonina et al. licensee BioMed Central.


Daubisse-Marliac L.,Tarn Cancer Registry | Daubisse-Marliac L.,Institute Claudius Regaud | Delafosse P.,Isere Cancer Registry | Boitard J.B.,Tarn Cancer Registry | And 5 more authors.
Annals of Oncology | Year: 2011

Background: The hypothesis of a link between breast cancer and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is evoked to explain the recent decrease of incidence observed in several countries. The purpose of our study is to analyse the evolution of breast cancer incidence by stage. Materials and methods: We used data from Tarn and Isère French cancer registries for the period 1990-2007. Trends of annual world population standardised incidence rates were studied using the Joinpoint method. Results: From 1990 to 1999, the incidence of invasive breast cancer increased annually by 1.2%, then by 4.8% from 1999 till 2003 and then decreased by 1.7%. For the women aged 50-74 years, annual changes were, respectively, 1.5%, 6.0% and 3.4%. In this group, the incidence of T1/T2-N0-M0 stages increased annually by 4.6% until 2003 and then decreased by 2.2%. Since 1990, the incidence of in situ breast cancer increased annually by 5%. From 2003 to 2004, prescribing of HRT decreased substantially. Conclusions: Since 2003, the incidence of invasive breast cancer decreased for women aged 50-74 years, mainly involving T1/T2-N0-M0 stages. The reduction in HRT prescription may partly explain this decrease. The incidence of in situ breast cancer didn't decrease during the whole period. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Tarn Cancer Registry, Isere Cancer Registry and Service de Biostatistique
Type: | Journal: BMC cancer | Year: 2015

To provide estimations of partial and total prevalence of 24 cancer sites in France in 2008. The estimations of partial prevalence were compared with the previous estimations for 2002.Nationwide estimations of incidence and survival data from cancer registries were used for partial prevalence. Nationwide incidence and mortality data were used to estimate total prevalence.At the end of 2008, in France, nearly 3 million people still alive had received a diagnosis of cancer. Of all prevalent cases, 36% were diagnosed 0 to 5 years earlier and 43% diagnosed 6 to 10 years earlier. The cancer sites with the highest prevalence were the prostate, the breast, and the colon-rectum. The changes in partial prevalence over 5 years (2002 to 2008) were considerable (+244,000 cases) and deemed to be highly related to changes in incidence.The present estimations update the French prevalence data and highlight the burden of cancer in the population, especially in the elderly. The methods of this study had the advantage of using recent incidence and survival data, which is necessary to show sudden changes in incidence trends and changes in survival that impact prevalence.


Seigneurin A.,Queen Mary, University of London | Field J.K.,University of Liverpool | Gachet A.,Isere Cancer Registry | Duffy S.W.,Queen Mary, University of London
Annals of Oncology | Year: 2014

Background: Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening has been shown to reduce mortality from lung cancer but at a substantial cost in diagnostic activity. The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics of screening programmes associated with recall rates, detection rates and positive predictive values (PPVs). Design: We conducted a systematic review of randomised trials and observational studies on LDCT screening for lung cancer. A meta-regression using random-effect logistic regressions was carried out to assess factors influencing recall rates for further investigation, cancer detection rates and PPVs of recall. Results: We used data from 63 372 prevalent screens from 16 studies of LDCT screening for lung cancer and 79 302 incident screens from nine studies. In univariable analysis, the use of a cut-off size to define nodules warranting further investigation at prevalent screens reduced recall rates [odds ratio (OR) = 0.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.24-0.82 and OR = 0.42, 95% CI 0.21-0.84 for cut-off sizes of 3-4 and 5-8 mm, respectively], without significant changes in detection rates and PPVs. The number of readers (1 or ≥2) was not associated with changes in recall rates, detection rates and PPVs at prevalent and incident screens. Using the volumetry software at incident screens significantly increased the PPV (OR = 5.02, 95% CI 1.65-15.28) as a result of a decrease in recall rates (OR = 0.25, 95% CI 0.12-0.51), without significant changes in detection rates. Conclusion: These results highlight the value of using a cut-off size for nodules warranting further investigation with lower recall rates at prevalent screens, whereas the volumetric assessment software at incident screens results in lower recall rates and higher PPVs. The presence of positron emission tomography in the work-up protocol might be associated with lower rates of surgical procedures for benign findings, although this hypothesis deserves further investigation. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Isere Cancer Registry
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of cancer | Year: 2010

Cancer mortality in elderly people is described to highlight the mechanisms that could potentially explain observed differences with other age groups. Data from 15 French cancer registries were considered in the search for the 5-year outcome of patients diagnosed during the period 1989-1997. Relative survival, excess mortality hazard, and hazard ratio of mortality were estimated to describe patient outcome according to age. Five cancer sites were selected: colon/rectum, prostate, breast, head/neck, and lung. An excess mortality rate was found in patients aged over 75 at the time of diagnosis. This excess mortality rate was mainly seen during the first months after diagnosis, then it decreased gradually with time. An initial phenomenon of patient selection, a greater disease severity at the time of diagnosis, and less-effective treatments given to elderly patients are the most plausible explanations for the increased risk of cancer-related death in the eldest patients.

Loading Isere Cancer Registry collaborators
Loading Isere Cancer Registry collaborators