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Jofre A.,IRTA Food Safety Programme | Aymerich T.,IRTA Food Safety Programme | Garriga M.,IRTA Food Safety Programme
Beneficial Microbes | Year: 2015

The production of long shelf-life highly concentrated dried probiotic/starter cultures is of paramount importance for the food industry. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effect of glucose, lactose, trehalose, and skim milk applied alone or combined upon the survival of potentially probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus CTC1679, Lactobacillus casei/paracasei CTC1677 and L. casei/paracasei CTC1678 during freeze-drying and after 39 weeks of storage at 4 and 22°C. Immediately after freeze-drying, the percentage of survivors was very high (≥94%) and only slight differences were observed among strains and cryoprotectants. In contrast, during storage, survival in the dried state depended on the cryoprotectant, temperature and strain. For all the protectants assayed, the stability of the cultures was remarkably higher when stored under refrigeration (4°C). Under these conditions, skim milk alone or supplemented with trehalose or lactose showed the best performance (reductions ≤0.9 log units after 39 weeks of storage). The lowest survival was observed during non-refrigerated storage and with glucose and glucose plus milk; no viable cells left at the end of the storage period. Thus, freeze-drying in the presence of appropriate cryoprotectants allows the production of long shelf-life highly concentrated dried cultures ready for incorporation in high numbers into food products as starter/potential probiotic cultures. © 2014 Wageningen Academic Publishers. Source


Garriga M.,IRTA Food Safety Programme | Rubio R.,IRTA Food Safety Programme | Aymerich T.,IRTA Food Safety Programme | Ruas-Madiedo P.,Institute Productos Lacteos Of Asturias
Beneficial Microbes | Year: 2015

The capability of five lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to counteract the adhesion of Listeria monocytogenes to the epithelial intestinal cell line HT29 was studied. The highest adhesion ability to HT29 was achieved by the intestinal strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus CTC1679, followed by the meat-derived strains Lactobacillus sakei CTC494 and Enterococcus faecium CTC8005. Surprisingly, the meat strains showed significantly better adhesion to HT29 than two faecal isolates of Lactobacillus casei and even significantly higher than the reference strain L. rhamnosus GG. Additionally, the anti-listerial, bacteriocin-producer starter culture L. sakei CTC494 was able to significantly reduce the adhesion of L. monocytogenes to HT29 in experiments of exclusion, competition and inhibition. The performance was better than the faecal isolate L. rhamnosus CTC1679. Our results reinforce the fact that the ability of LAB to interact with a host epithelium model, as well as to antagonise with foodborne pathogens, is a strain-specific characteristic. Additionally, it is underlined that this trait is not dependent on the origin of the bacterium, since some food LAB behave better than intestinal ones. Therefore, the search for novel strains in food niches is a suitable approach to find those with potential health benefits. These strains are likely pre-adapted to the food environment, which would make their inclusion in the formulation of probiotic foods more feasible. © 2014 Wageningen Academic Publishers. Source


Rubio R.,IRTA Food Safety Programme | Jofre A.,IRTA Food Safety Programme | Aymerich T.,IRTA Food Safety Programme | Guardia M.D.,Food Technology Programme | Garriga M.,IRTA Food Safety Programme
Meat Science | Year: 2014

The suitability of three potential probiotic lactobacilli strains (Lactobacillus casei CTC1677, L. casei CTC1678 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CTC1679), previously isolated from infants' faeces and characterized, and three commercial probiotic strains (Lactobacillus plantarum 299v, L. rhamnosus GG and L. casei Shirota) was assessed during the manufacture of low-acid fermented sausages (fuets) with reduced Na+ and fat content. The inoculated strains were successfully monitored by RAPD-PCR during the process. L. rhamnosus CTC1679 was the only strain able to grow and dominate (levels ca. 108CFU/g) the endogenous lactic acid bacteria population in two independent trials, throughout the ripening process. Thus, fuet containing L. rhamnosus CTC1679 as a starter culture could be a suitable vehicle for putative probiotic bacteria delivery. All the final products recorded a satisfactory overall sensory quality without any noticeable off-flavour, and with the characteristic sensory properties of low-acid fermented sausages. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Rubio R.,IRTA Food Safety Programme | Jofre A.,IRTA Food Safety Programme | Martin B.,IRTA Food Safety Programme | Aymerich T.,IRTA Food Safety Programme | Garriga M.,IRTA Food Safety Programme
Food Microbiology | Year: 2014

A total of 109 lactic acid bacteria isolated from infant faeces were identified by partial 16S rRNA, cpn60 and/or pheS sequencing. Lactobacillus was the most prevalent genus, representing 48% of the isolates followed by Enterococcus (38%). Lactobacillus gasseri (21%) and Enterococcus faecalis (38%) were the main species detected. A further selection of potential probiotic starter cultures for fermented sausages focused on Lactobacillus as the most technologically relevant genus in this type of product. Lactobacilli strains were evaluated for their ability to grow invitro in the processing conditions of fermented sausages and for their functional and safety properties, including antagonistic activity against foodborne pathogens, survival from gastrointestinal tract conditions (acidity, bile and pancreatin), tyramine production, antibiotic susceptibility and aggregation capacity. The best strains according to the results obtained were Lactobacillus casei/paracasei CTC1677, L. casei/paracasei CTC1678, Lactobacillus rhamnosus CTC1679, L.gasseri CTC1700, L.gasseri CTC1704, Lactobacillus fermentum CTC1693. Those strains were further assayed as starter cultures in model sausages. L.casei/paracasei CTC1677, L.casei/paracasei CTC1678 and L.rhamnosus CTC1679 were able to lead the fermentation and dominate (levels ca. 108CFU/g) the endogenous lactic acid bacteria, confirming their suitability as probiotic starter cultures. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Rubio R.,IRTA Food Safety Programme | Bover-Cid S.,IRTA Food Safety Programme | Martin B.,IRTA Food Safety Programme | Garriga M.,IRTA Food Safety Programme | Aymerich T.,IRTA Food Safety Programme
Food Microbiology | Year: 2013

Three bacteriocinogenic, non-aminogenic and non-virulent Enterococcus strains (Enterococcus faecium CTC8005, Enterococcus devriesei CTC8006 and Enterococcus casseliflavus CTC8003) were used as starter cultures in low-acid fermented sausages to assess their competitiveness and their bioprotective potential against Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. The inoculated strains were successfully monitored by RAPD-PCR. All the strains were able to grow, survive and dominate the endogenous enterococci population and avoided the growth of Enterobacteriaceae. E. devriesei CTC8006 and E. faecium CTC8005 particularly inhibited the growth of L. monocytogenes during the whole ripening process. S. aureus was not affected by the inoculated bacteriocinogenic enterococci strains. The application of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment (600 MPa for 5 min) at the end of ripening (day 21) produced an immediate reduction in the counts of Enterobacteriaceae to levels <1 log cfu/g and promoted a decrease of 1-log unit in the counts of S. aureus. E. faecium CTC8005, which reduced the counts of L. monocytogenes ca. 2 log cfu/g immediately after stuffing and in combination with HHP treatment promoted a further reduction of 1 log cfu/g in the pathogen counts. The combination of E. faecium CTC8005 and HHP was the most efficient antilisterial approach. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. Source

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