Orlando, FL, United States
Orlando, FL, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Gleason B.,University of Central Florida | Gleason B.,Clemson University | Wachtel P.,University of Central Florida | Wachtel P.,Clemson University | And 7 more authors.
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2013

The structural and optical properties of AsSe chalcogenide glass, starting with As40Se60, were studied as a function of Ge or Se additions. These elements provide broad glass forming options when combined with the host matrix to allow for compositional tuning of properties. Optimization of glass composition has been shown to produce bulk glasses with a thermoptic coefficient (dn/dT) equal to zero, as well as a composition which could demonstrate a net zero change in index after precision glass molding (PGM). The bulk glass density, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), refractive index, and dn/dT were measured for all bulk compositions, as was the refractive index after PGM. For the bulk glasses examined, both the refractive index (measured at discrete laser wavelengths from 3.4 to10.6 μm) and dn/dT were observed to decrease as the molecular percentage of either Ge or Se is increased. Compared to the starting glass' network, additions of either Ge or Se lead to a deviation from the 'optimally constrained binary glass' average coordination number ≤;.4. Additions of Se or Ge serve to decrease or increase the average coordination number (CN) of the glass, respectively, while also changing the network's polarizability. After a representative PGM process, glasses exhibited an 'index drop consistent with that seen for oxide glasses.1 Based on our evaluation, both the Gecontaining and Ge-free tielines show potential for developing unique compositions with either a zero dn/dT for the unmolded, bulk glass, as well as the potential for a glass that demonstrates a net zero 'index drop after molding. Such correlation of glass chemistry, network, physical and optical properties will enable the tailoring of novel compositions suitable for prototyping towards targeted molding behavior and final properties. © 2013 SPIE.


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

This report focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering  Kopp Glass  IRradiance Glass  LightPath Technologies  Amorphous Materials,Inc. (AMI)  Raytek  Advanced Glass Industries  SCHOTT  Umicore  AGC  PGW By types, the market can be split into  Type I  Type II  Type III By Application, the market can be split into  Astronomy  Consumer Optics  Industrial Equipment  Lithography  Medical & Biotech  Safety & Security  Automotive  Construction By Regions, this report covers (we can add the regions/countries as you want)  North America  China  Europe  Southeast Asia  Japan  India Global IR Glass Market Professional Survey Report 2016  1 Industry Overview of IR Glass  1.1 Definition and Specifications of IR Glass  1.1.1 Definition of IR Glass  1.1.2 Specifications of IR Glass  1.2 Classification of IR Glass  1.2.1 Type I  1.2.2 Type II  1.2.3 Type III  1.3 Applications of IR Glass  1.3.1 Astronomy  1.3.2 Consumer Optics  1.3.3 Industrial Equipment  1.3.4 Lithography  1.3.5 Medical & Biotech  1.3.6 Safety & Security  1.3.7 Automotive  1.3.8 Construction  1.4 Market Segment by Regions  1.4.1 North America  1.4.2 China  1.4.3 Europe  1.4.4 Southeast Asia  1.4.5 Japan  1.4.6 India 8 Major Manufacturers Analysis of IR Glass  8.1 Kopp Glass  8.1.1 Company Profile  8.1.2 Product Picture and Specifications  8.1.2.1 Type I  8.1.2.2 Type II  8.1.2.3 Type III  8.1.3 Kopp Glass 2015 IR Glass Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis  8.1.4 Kopp Glass 2015 IR Glass Business Region Distribution Analysis  8.2 IRradiance Glass  8.2.1 Company Profile  8.2.2 Product Picture and Specifications  8.2.2.1 Type I  8.2.2.2 Type II  8.2.2.3 Type III  8.2.3 IRradiance Glass 2015 IR Glass Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis  8.2.4 IRradiance Glass 2015 IR Glass Business Region Distribution Analysis  8.3 LightPath Technologies  8.3.1 Company Profile  8.3.2 Product Picture and Specifications  8.3.2.1 Type I  8.3.2.2 Type II  8.3.2.3 Type III  8.3.3 LightPath Technologies 2015 IR Glass Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis  8.3.4 LightPath Technologies 2015 IR Glass Business Region Distribution Analysis  8.4 Amorphous Materials,Inc. (AMI)  8.4.1 Company Profile  8.4.2 Product Picture and Specifications  8.4.2.1 Type I  8.4.2.2 Type II  8.4.2.3 Type III  8.4.3 Amorphous Materials,Inc. (AMI) 2015 IR Glass Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis  8.4.4 Amorphous Materials,Inc. (AMI) 2015 IR Glass Business Region Distribution Analysis  8.5 Raytek  8.5.1 Company Profile  8.5.2 Product Picture and Specifications  8.5.2.1 Type I  8.5.2.2 Type II  8.5.2.3 Type III  8.5.3 Raytek 2015 IR Glass Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis  8.5.4 Raytek 2015 IR Glass Business Region Distribution Analysis  8.6 Advanced Glass Industries  8.6.1 Company Profile  8.6.2 Product Picture and Specifications  8.6.2.1 Type I  8.6.2.2 Type II  8.6.2.3 Type III  8.6.3 Advanced Glass Industries 2015 IR Glass Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis  8.6.4 Advanced Glass Industries 2015 IR Glass Business Region Distribution Analysis  8.7 SCHOTT  8.7.1 Company Profile  8.7.2 Product Picture and Specifications  8.7.2.1 Type I  8.7.2.2 Type II  8.7.2.3 Type III  8.7.3 SCHOTT 2015 IR Glass Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis  8.7.4 SCHOTT 2015 IR Glass Business Region Distribution Analysis  8.8 Umicore  8.8.1 Company Profile  8.8.2 Product Picture and Specifications  8.8.2.1 Type I  8.8.2.2 Type II  8.8.2.3 Type III  8.8.3 Umicore 2015 IR Glass Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis  8.8.4 Umicore 2015 IR Glass Business Region Distribution Analysis  8.9 AGC  8.9.1 Company Profile  8.9.2 Product Picture and Specifications  8.9.2.1 Type I  8.9.2.2 Type II  8.9.2.3 Type III  8.9.3 AGC 2015 IR Glass Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis  8.9.4 AGC 2015 IR Glass Business Region Distribution Analysis  8.10 PGW  8.10.1 Company Profile  8.10.2 Product Picture and Specifications  8.10.2.1 Type I  8.10.2.2 Type II  8.10.2.3 Type III  8.10.3 PGW 2015 IR Glass Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis  8.10.4 PGW 2015 IR Glass Business Region Distribution Analysis


Lin H.,University of Delaware | Li L.,University of Delaware | Zou Y.,University of Delaware | Du Q.,Massachusetts Institute of Technology | And 7 more authors.
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2014

Conventional photonic integration technologies are inevitably substrate-dependent, as different substrate platforms stipulate vastly different device fabrication methods and processing compatibility requirements. Here we capitalize on the unique monolithic integration capacity of composition-engineered non-silicate glass materials (amorphous chalcogenides and transition metal oxides) to enable multifunctional, multi-layer photonic integration on virtually any technically important substrate platforms. We show that high-index glass film deposition and device fabrication can be performed at low temperatures (< 250 °C) without compromising their low loss characteristics, and is thus fully compatible with monolithic integration on a broad range of substrates including semiconductors, plastics, textiles, and metals. Application of the technology is highlighted through three examples: demonstration of high-performance mid-IR photonic sensors on fluoride crystals, direct fabrication of photonic structures on graphene, and 3-D photonic integration on flexible plastic substrates. © 2014 SPIE.


Singh V.,Massachusetts Institute of Technology | Lin P.T.,Massachusetts Institute of Technology | Patel N.,Massachusetts Institute of Technology | Lin H.,University of Delaware | And 20 more authors.
Science and Technology of Advanced Materials | Year: 2014

In this article, we review our recent work on mid-infrared (mid-IR) photonic materials and devices fabricated on silicon for on-chip sensing applications. Pedestal waveguides based on silicon are demonstrated as broadband mid-IR sensors. Our low-loss mid-IR directional couplers demonstrated in SiNx waveguides are useful in differential sensing applications. Photonic crystal cavities and microdisk resonators based on chalcogenide glasses for high sensitivity are also demonstrated as effective mid-IR sensors. Polymer-based functionalization layers, to enhance the sensitivity and selectivity of our sensor devices, are also presented. We discuss the design of mid-IR chalcogenide waveguides integrated with polycrystalline PbTe detectors on a monolithic silicon platform for optical sensing, wherein the use of a low-index spacer layer enables the evanescent coupling of mid-IR light from the waveguides to the detector. Finally, we show the successful fabrication processing of our first prototype mid-IR waveguide-integrated detectors. © 2014 National Institute for Materials Science.


Zou Y.,University of Delaware | Moreel L.,University of Delaware | Lin H.,University of Delaware | Zhou J.,University of Delaware | And 8 more authors.
Advanced Optical Materials | Year: 2014

Organic polymer materials are widely credited with extreme versatility for thin film device processing. However, they generally lack the high refractive indices of inorganic semiconductors essential for tight optical confinement in planar integrated photonic circuits. Inorganic-organic hybrid photonic systems overcome these limits by combining both types of materials, although such hybrid integration remains challenging given the vastly different properties of the two types of materials. In this paper, a new approach is used to realize inorganic-organic hybrid photonics using chalcogenide glass (ChG) materials. Known as an amorphous semiconductor, the glass possesses high refractive indices, and can be prepared in a thin film form through solution deposition and patterned via direct thermal nanoimprinting, processing methods traditionally exclusive to polymer materials only. Sub-micrometer waveguides, microring resonators, and diffraction gratings fabricated from solution processed (SP) ChG films can be monolithically integrated with organic polymer substrates to create mechanically flexible, high-index-contrast photonic devices. The resonators exhibit a high quality factor (Q-factor) of 80 000 near 1550 nm wavelength. Free-standing, flexible ChG gratings whose diffraction properties can be readily tailored by conformal integration on nonplanar surfaces are also demonstrated. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Lin H.,University of Delaware | Li L.,University of Delaware | Deng F.,University of Delaware | Ni C.,University of Delaware | And 4 more authors.
Optics Letters | Year: 2013

We have demonstrated what we believe to be the first waveguide photonic crystal cavity operating in the midinfrared. The devices were fabricated from Ge23Sb7S70 chalcogenide glass (ChG) on CaF 2 substrates by combing photolithographic patterning and focused ion beam milling. The waveguide-coupled cavities were characterized using a fiber end fire coupling method at 5.2 μm wavelength, and a loaded quality factor of ̃2000 was measured near the critical coupling regime. © 2013 Optical Society of America.


Zou Y.,University of Delaware | Zhang D.,University of Delaware | Lin H.,University of Delaware | Li L.,University of Delaware | And 10 more authors.
Advanced Optical Materials | Year: 2014

This paper reports a versatile technique for the fabrication of high-index-contrast photonic structures on both silicon and plastic substrates. The fabrication technique combines low-temperature chalcogenide glass film deposition and resist-free single-step thermal nanoimprint to process low-loss, sub-micron single-mode waveguides with a smooth surface finish using simple contact photolithography. Using this approach, the first chalcogenide glass microring resonators are fabricated by thermal nanoimprinting. The devices exhibit an ultra-high quality factor of 4 × 105 near 1550 nm wavelengths, which represents the highest value reported in chalcogenide glass microring resonators. Furthermore, sub-micrometer nanoimprinting of chalcogenide glass films on non-planar plastic substrates is demonstrated, which establishes the method as a facile route for the monolithic fabrication of high-index-contrast devices on a wide array of unconventional substrates. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Li L.,University of Delaware | Lin H.,University of Delaware | Qiao S.,University of Texas at Austin | Zou Y.,University of Delaware | And 6 more authors.
Nature Photonics | Year: 2014

Photonic integration on thin flexible plastic substrates is important for emerging applications ranging from the realization of flexible interconnects to conformal sensors applied to the skin. Such devices are traditionally fabricated using pattern transfer, which is complicated and has limited integration capacity. Here, we report a convenient monolithic approach to realize flexible, integrated high-index-contrast chalcogenide glass photonic devices. By developing local neutral axis designs and suitable fabrication techniques, we realize a suite of photonic devices including waveguides, microdisk resonators, add-drop filters and photonic crystals that have excellent optical performance and mechanical flexibility, enabling repeated bending down to sub-millimetre radii without measurable performance degradation. The approach offers a facile fabrication route for three-dimensional high-index-contrast photonics that are difficult to create using traditional methods. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.34K | Year: 2015

ABSTRACT: IRradiance Glass, Inc. proposes a Phase I STTR program in conjunction with the University of Central Florida to demonstrate the feasibility of the design, development, and production of high numerical aperture (NA) cylindrical lenses for use in the mid- to long-wave infrared optical region by extruding chalcogenide glasses into a micro-lens shape (~2mm wide x 2 mm high x 3 mm long) with a focal length of ~2mm and a NA of ~0.8. Feasibility of the project will be determined by the successful manufacture of several prototype lenses. Additional efforts in Phase I will investigate methods of improving laser damage threshold. A successful Phase I proof-of-concept effort will pave the way to a more comprehensive program in Phases II and III, aimed at the design and high-volume production of cylindrical lenses with robust laser damage thresholds lenses that deliver the required optical functions in a single component to be integrated in a complete QCL system.; BENEFIT: Cylindrical lenses, especially high-NA lenses, are critical for the proper collection and collimation of laser light in quantum cascade laser (QCL) systems, which are fast becoming the laser of choice for imaging and sensing applications in the infrared (3-8 micron) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Because of the way in which the QCL devices are fabricated, this light is not well collimated on its exit from the QCL. This beam divergence can severely degrade the optical performance system in some cases. For laser systems that operate in the visible and near-IR and suffer from the same divergence and collimation issues, cylindrical lenses made from fused silica are typically employed to correct for the beam divergence and capture all of the light exiting the laser. For mid- to long-wave IR optical systems, the cylindrical lenses available are from crystalline IR materials like ZnSe or Ge, which must be individually machined to precise optical function specifications. Extrusion of chalcogenide glass cylindrical lenses would provide a manufacturing benefit, allowing lower-cost processes and faster turn-around time for production. Creation of the proof-of-concept cylindrical lenses from IR-transparent chalcogenide glasses is the primary aim of the proposed Phase I program.

Loading IRradiance Glass collaborators
Loading IRradiance Glass collaborators