Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Grant R.,IRIS Independent Research
Air Force Magazine | Year: 2012

Technical advances have the Air Force on the verge of refueling operations with no human present. Flight tests beginning in the mid- 2000s have pioneered methods for automation routines. And more is coming. Summer 2012 may see tests of one unmanned aircraft refueling another. The real impetus toward automated air refueling came from research in the early 2000s on a Joint Unmanned Combat Air System program, dubbed J-UCAS. This program ultimately did not proceed, and part of it was spun off to create the Navy UCAS demonstrator now flying as the Northrop Grumman X-47B. True autonomy is a different beast. It stems from command routines based on sensor inputs exclusive of human intervention. In 2009, Boeing again won the Air Force Research Laboratory's contract, this time worth $49 million for a full test program. Reports at the time hinted that part of the reason for AFRL's interest was to explore automated refueling of an optionally manned new long-range strike bomber. Source


Grant R.,IRIS Independent Research
Air Force Magazine | Year: 2012

Significant changes were made in the way the leadership of the US Air Force over a period of time. The post of Chief of Staff was transformed when Gen. Norton A. Schwartz completed his four-year stint as USAF Chief of Staff in August 2012. He was the first uniformed leader who was neither a fighter nor bomber pilot, and came from the special operations and mobility fields. The general makeup of Corona four-star meetings was changing, which was a good development for the service. The membership comprised of fighter pilots, officers drawn from the mobility, bomber, space, acquisition, and financial management communities. The group also included the Air Force's first female four-star, Gen. Janet C. Wolfenbarger, head of Air Force Materiel Command at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. Source


Grant R.,IRIS Independent Research
Air Force Magazine | Year: 2012

The article describes how Merrill McPeak and Donald Rice dramatically reshaped the Air Force in 1991 and 1992, creating the organization still used today. The Berlin Wall came down in 1989, Germany reunited, and the Soviet Union dissolved in December 1991. The strategy embraced the end of the Cold War and prepared for an uncertain 'new world order' where the main military challenges would come from regional conflicts. The subtext here resonated with issues raised by Air Force operations from Vietnam through Desert Storm. In those conflicts, SAC had kept jealous control of its bombers and its crucial tankers. Regional air force commanders had to work out agreements with SAC for use of their assets, as SAC still had a nuclear deterrent to maintain. However, commanders chafed at having to deal with SAC while also deploying and fighting. Source


Grant R.,IRIS Independent Research
Air Force Magazine | Year: 2012

The US Air Force (USAF) made $213.6 million down payment on its future by launching a new Adaptive Engine Technology Development (AETD) research program. USAF laid the foundation for a new class of engines with the adaptive engine program. The goal was to demonstrate a variable cycle propulsion system enabling a 25 percent or greater specific fuel consumption reduction. Senior officials said the success in adaptive engine technologies would deliver better range, persistence, performance, and energy savings for multiple types of combat aircraft. AETD technologies were expected to improve fuel efficiency, durability, and thrust performance for a wide range of air vehicles and applications. This engine could be used in a whole host of platforms should it ever reach the point of being a development program. Source


Grant R.,IRIS Independent Research
Air Force Magazine | Year: 2012

Although the war in Iraq is over and Afghanistan is winding down, the momentum for ISR (intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance) capability continues. The unblinking eye is really a set of ISR capabilities, from fine-tuned 30 frames per second video covering a tiny area to sophisticated radar tracks spanning whole swaths of a country. New wide-area motion imagery (WAMI) packages such as the Gorgon Stare system will enable a single ISR aircraft, manned or unmanned, to cover several areas at once. With Gorgon Stare, the Predator can establish a citywide view or isolate simultaneous spot image areas with greater resolution. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has developed another wide area imaging process called Autonomous Real-time Ground Ubiquitous Surveillance, or ARGUS, which can cover about 40 square miles. Radar sensors remain the key to an unblinking eye for theater-wide views, all-weather imaging, and track detection. Source

Discover hidden collaborations