IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza San Giovanni Rotondo

www.operapadrepio.it
San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy

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PubMed | IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza San Giovanni Rotondo
Type: Evaluation Studies | Journal: Journal of biological regulators and homeostatic agents | Year: 2012

Flow mediated vasodilation (FMD) evaluates the endothelium-dependent vasodilation, is a reliable marker of arterial endothelial dysfunction and is related to coronary artery disease. Visceral fat predicts an unfavorable cardiovascular and metabolic risk profile in humans and echocardiographic assessment of epicardial fat (EF) is a reliable marker of visceral adiposity. We measured the FMD and EF thickness in 77 subjects, 38 without idiopathic deep vein thrombosis (DVT) (mean age 65.95 16.29 years) and 39 with idiopathic DVT (mean age 65.49 17.22 years). The purpose of this work is to investigate the presence of statistical association between FMD and DVT and between EF thickness and DVT. Furthermore, to account for possible atherosclerosis risk factor unbalances, comparison between FMD and DVT (and between EF and DVT) was assessed using a multivariate logistic regression model which included the following covariates: FMD, EF, age, sex, smoking and the presence of obesity. Subjects without DVT showed significant lower values of EF thickness (9.07 1.89 mm vs 12.32 1.73 mm, p=0.005) and borderline-significant greater values of FMD (9.01 2.77 percent vs 7.47 5.37 percent, p=0.058) as compared to those with DVT. In conclusion, the data presented indicate that subjects affected by spontaneous deep vein thrombosis may have an impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation, a marker of arterial endothelial dysfunction related to coronary artery disease, and an increased epicardial adipose tissue, a marker of cardiometabolic risk.


PubMed | IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza San Giovanni Rotondo
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Oncotarget | Year: 2014

The benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal carcinoma are well known. However, there is still considerable uncertainty about the optimal radiation treatment. There is an ongoing debate about the choice between very short treatments immediately followed by surgical resection and prolonged treatments with delayed surgery. In this paper, we describe an interim analysis of a non-controlled clinical trial in which radiotherapy delivered with intermediate dose/duration was followed by surgery after about 2 weeks to improve local control and survival after curative radiosurgery for cT3 low/middle rectal cancer.Preoperative radiotherapy (36 Gy in 3 weeks) was delivered in 248 consecutive patients with cT3NxM0 rectal adenocarcinoma within 10 cm from the anal verge, followed by surgery within the third week after treatment completion.166 patients (66.94%) underwent anterior resection, 80 patients (32.26%) the Miles procedure and 2 patients (0.8%) the Hartmanns procedure. Local resectability rate was 99.6%, with 226 curative-intent resections. The overall rate of complications was 27.4%. 5-year oncologic outcomes were evaluated on 223 patients. The median follow-up time was 8.9 years (range 5-17.4 years); local recurrence (LR) rate and distal recurrence (DR) rate after 5 years were 6.28% and 21.97%, respectively. Overall survival was 74.2%; disease free survival was 73.5%; local control was 93.4 % and metastasis-free survival was 82.1%.preoperative radiotherapy with intermediate dose/duration and interval between radiotherapy and surgery achieves high local control in patients with cT3NxM0 rectal cancer, and high DR rate seems to be the major limitation to improved survival.

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