Policlinico San Donato IRCCS

San Donato di Ninea, Italy

Policlinico San Donato IRCCS

San Donato di Ninea, Italy
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Ruys T.E.P.,Erasmus Medical Center | Roos-Hesselink J.W.,Erasmus Medical Center | Hall R.,Norwich University | Subirana-Domelnech M.T.,Hospital Of Sant Pau | And 8 more authors.
Heart | Year: 2014

Objective Heart failure (HF) is one of the most important complications in pregnant women with heart disease, causing maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. Methods This is an international observational registry of patients with structural heart disease during pregnancy. Sixty hospitals in 28 countries enrolled 1321 women between 2007 and 2011. Pregnant women with valvular heart disease, congenital heart disease, ischaemic heart disease, or cardiomyopathy could be included. Main outcome measures were onset and predictors of HF and maternal and fetal death. Results In total, 173 (13.1%) of the 1321 patients developed HF, making HF the most common major cardiovascular complication during pregnancy. Baseline parameters associated with HF were New York Heart Association class ≥3, signs of HF, WHO category ≥3, cardiomyopathy or pulmonary hypertension. HF occurred at a median time of 31 weeks gestation (IQR 23-40) with the highest incidence at the end of the second trimester (34%) or peripartum (31%). Maternal mortality was higher in patients with HF (4.8% in patients with HF and 0.5% in those without HF p<0.001). Pre-eclampsia was strongly related to HF (OR 7.1, 95% CI 3.9 to 13.2, p<0.001). Fetal death and the incidence of preterm birth were higher in women with HF compared to women without HF (4.6% vs 1.2%, p=0.001; and 30% vs 13%, p=0.001). Conclusions HF was the most common complication during pregnancy, and occurred typically at the end of the second trimester, or after birth. It was most common in women with cardiomyopathy or pulmonary hypertension and was strongly associated with pre-eclampsia and an adverse maternal and perinatal outcome.


PubMed | S. Orsola Malpighi University Hospital, University of Michigan, University of Pennsylvania, Hospital General Universitari Vall dHebron and 8 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Aorta (Stamford, Conn.) | Year: 2016

The classical presentation of a patient with Type B acute aortic dissection (TBAAD) is characterized by severe chest, back, or abdominal pain, ripping or tearing in nature. However, some patients present with painless acute aortic dissection, which can lead to a delay in diagnosis and treatment. We utilized the International Registry on Acute Aortic Dissections (IRAD) database to study these patients.We analyzed 43 painless TBAAD patients enrolled in the database between January 1996 and July 2012. The differences in presentation, diagnostics, management, and outcome were compared with patients presenting with painful TBAAD.Among the 1162 TBAAD patients enrolled in IRAD, 43 patients presented with painless TBAAD (3.7%). The mean age of patients with painless TBAAD was significantly higher than normal TBAAD patients (69.2 versus 63.3 years, P = 0.020). The presence of atherosclerosis (46.4% versus 30.1%, P = 0.022), diabetes (17.9% versus 7.5%; P = 0.018), and other aortic diseases (8.6% versus 2.3%, P= 0.051), such as prior aortic aneurysm (31% versus 18.8% P = 0.049) was more common in these patients. Median delay time between presentation and diagnosis was longer in painless patients (median 34.0 versus 19.0 hours; P = 0.006). Dissection of iatrogenic origin (19.5% versus 1.3%; P < 0.001) was significantly more frequent in the painless group. The in-hospital mortality was 18.6% in the painless group, compared with an in-hospital mortality of 9.9% in the control group (P = 0.063).Painless TBAAD is a relatively rare presentation (3.7%) of aortic dissection, and is often associated with a history of atherosclerosis, diabetes, prior aortic disease including aortic aneurysm, and an iatrogenic origin. We observed a trend for increased in-hospital mortality in painless TBAAD patients, which may be the result of a delay in diagnosis and management. Therefore, physicians should be aware of this relative rare presentation of TBAAD.


Perfetti A.,Policlinico San Donato IRCCS | Greco S.,Policlinico San Donato IRCCS | Bugiardini E.,Policlinico San Donato IRCCS | Bugiardini E.,University of Milan | And 6 more authors.
Neuromuscular Disorders | Year: 2014

Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) lacks non-invasive and easy to measure biomarkers, still largely relying on semi-quantitative tests for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Muscle biopsies provide valuable data, but their use is limited by their invasiveness. microRNA (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs regulating gene expression that are also present in biological fluids and may serve as diseases biomarkers. Thus, we tested plasma miRNAs in the blood of 36 DM1 patients and 36 controls. First, a wide miRNA panel was profiled in a patient subset, followed by validation using all recruited subjects. We identified a signature of nine deregulated miRNAs in DM1 patients: eight miRNAs were increased (miR-133a, miR-193b, miR-191, miR-140-3p, miR-454, miR-574, miR-885-5p, miR-886-3p) and one (miR-27b) was decreased. Next, the levels of these miRNAs were used to calculate a "DM1-miRNAs score". We found that both miR-133a levels and DM1-miRNAs score discriminated DM1 from controls significantly and Receiver-Operator Characteristic curves displayed an area under the curve of 0.94 and 0.97, respectively. Interestingly, both miR-133a levels and DM1-miRNAs score displayed an inverse correlation with skeletal muscle strength and displayed higher values in more compromised patients.In conclusion, we identified a characteristic plasma miRNA signature of DM1. Although preliminary, this study indicates miRNAs as potential DM1 humoral biomarkers. © 2014 The Authors.


Butera G.,Policlinico San Donato IRCCS | Manica J.L.L.,Institute Cardiologia | Marini D.,Policlinico San Donato IRCCS | Piazza L.,Policlinico San Donato IRCCS | And 4 more authors.
Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions | Year: 2014

Background Bare stents has become the first line therapy for aortic coarctation. Covered stents has been reported more recently in clinical practice. Objectives The present study, reports comparatively 15-year experience of bare and covered stent implantation for aortic coarctation in a single tertiary referral center. Methods From 1997 to 2011, 143 patients with native or postoperative aortic coarctation were treated at our institution. Seventy-one subjects (median age 17 years (range from 4 to 70 years) underwent bare stent implantation (Group 1) while 72 patients (median age of 17.5 years (range from 6 to 68 years) underwent covered stent implantation (Group 2). Results Success rate in the whole group was 95%. More complex and tighter coarctations were treated using covered stents. Incidence of related-procedure adverse events was higher in Group 1 than in group 2 (21.1% vs 8.3% P=0.035). Aortic wall complications occurred in 7% of patients in Group 1 (one death) and 0% in Group 2 (P=0.028). Subjects in Group 1 had a longer follow-up (median 85 vs 35 months; P<0.001). Independent predictors associated with reintervention included the presence of complex lesions (HR: 2.70; CI: 1.15-6.32), balloon diameter used <14 mm (HR: 3.76; CI: 1.48-9.55), and immediate residual gradient >10 mm Hg (HR: 4.30; CI: 1.96-9.47). Conclusions Both bare and covered stent implantation for aortic coarctation is a safe and efficacious treatment. By using covered stent implantation the spectrum of patients treated has increased with lower rates of acute and late complications. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


MacDonald S.T.,Policlinico San Donato IRCCS | Carminati M.,Policlinico San Donato IRCCS | Butera G.,Policlinico San Donato IRCCS
Journal of Invasive Cardiology | Year: 2011

BACKGROUND: A number of percutaneous devices are available to embolize anomalous vessels in congenital heart disease. We report our initial single-center experience with the new Amplatzer Vascular Plug IV (AVP IV) in congenital heart disease to embolize a coronary artery fistula and aortopulmonary collateral arteries in 4 cases. METHODS: From August 2009 until April 2010, 7 AVP IV devices were deployed in 4 patients, age range 5 months to 9 years, weight 3.5-27.7 kg. One patient had a large coronary artery fistula, the others had anomalous aortopulmonary collaterals; 2 patients had tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia, with the other having dextrocardia, anomalous pulmonary venous drainage and pulmonary atresia. RESULTS: In all 4 patients, vessels intended to be closed with the AVP IV were closed successfully with minimal residual shunting and no device failures. Deployed devices ranged from 4-8 mm in diameter. One patient had 4 devices, closing large branching infradiaphragmatic aortopulmonary collaterals. The other 3 patients had single devices. Complete vessel embolization was seen with no device embolization or implantation complication. CONCLUSION: This preliminary experience illustrates the utility of the AVP IV in congenital heart disease, occluding a coronary artery fistula and aorto-pulmonary collaterals, with devices between 4 mm and 8 mm in diameter, demonstrating its safety and effectiveness. It is particularly useful in embolizing difficult-to-reach large, tortuous vessels with a small-sized catheter in a single procedure. Longer-term follow up in a larger cohort of patients will be required to establish long-term efficacy and device safety.


Butera G.,Policlinico San Donato IRCCS | Lovin N.,Institutul Of Boli Cardiovasculare Profdrgeorge Im Georgescu | Basile D.P.,Policlinico San Donato IRCCS
Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions | Year: 2016

Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) transcatheter closure is a widespread procedure. However in some cases PDA measurements may be unclear and choice of the proper device could be quite difficult. This may happen in large PDA and in particular in adults. We have developed a new technique using an ASD sizing balloon to measure the PDA in order to better understand PDA anatomy and size. The first step is to create an artero-venous circuit across the PDA. A 24 or a 34 mm Amplatzer balloon sizing for ASD closure is placed over the wire from the venous access in the descending aorta. Then, the balloon is inflated and gently pulled back across the PDA toward the pulmonary artery. The frame where the balloon is exactly across the PDA is chosen and measurements performed. In conclusion, a new method for PDA measurement in large PDA is reported. The procedure is safe and reliable. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


PubMed | Policlinico San Donato IRCCS and St Elizabeth Catholic General Hospital
Type: | Journal: The Pan African medical journal | Year: 2016

Sudden cardiac deaths, which account for approximately 350 000 deaths each year, is a major health care problem. Antiarrhythmic drugs have not been reliable in preventing sudden cardiac death. Although -blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and revascularization play a role in prevention of sudden cardiac death, the development and subsequent refinement of the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator has made the most important contribution to its management. We report the first documented implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator in central, eastern and western Africa.


PubMed | Policlinico San Donato IRCCS
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Catheterization and cardiovascular interventions : official journal of the Society for Cardiac Angiography & Interventions | Year: 2016

To report on a new technique that increases the safety of percutaneous atrial septal defect (ASD) closure using a goose-neck snare system.ASD transcatheter closure is a widespread procedure. However, in some cases, ASDs may be large and with soft rims. In these situation, a potential risk exists for device malposition or embolization.When transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) evaluation and balloon sizing showed large defects with floppy rims the chosen Amplatzer device was implanted in a standard way. In large defects with floppy rims, before release a 5-mm goose-neck snare with its 4 Fr catheter was placed across the delivery cable and fixed to catch the screwing mechanism of implanted Amplatzer device. The delivery cable was unscrewed and the device reached its final position without any tension. If the position was considered satisfactory the device was released from the goose-neck snare.Thirteen patients had a snare-assisted ASD transcatheter closure. Median device size was 24 mm (range 14-38 mm). Retrieval or repositioning of the device using the goose-neck snare was performed in four cases: in three patients, because of device malposition after delivery cable release and in one patient, because of unsuitability of closure of a second significant defect. Furthermore, in two subjects with multiple ASDs, a second fenestration looked quite significant with the device still attached to the delivery cable while it appeared smaller after release.Snare-assisted Amplatzer ASD device placement is a new method for ASD percutaneous closure and adds safety to the procedure.


PubMed | Policlinico San Donato IRCCS and Institutul Of Boli Cardiovasculare Profdrgeorge Im Georgescu
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Catheterization and cardiovascular interventions : official journal of the Society for Cardiac Angiography & Interventions | Year: 2016

Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) transcatheter closure is a widespread procedure. However in some cases PDA measurements may be unclear and choice of the proper device could be quite difficult. This may happen in large PDA and in particular in adults. We have developed a new technique using an ASD sizing balloon to measure the PDA in order to better understand PDA anatomy and size. The first step is to create an artero-venous circuit across the PDA. A 24 or a 34 mm Amplatzer balloon sizing for ASD closure is placed over the wire from the venous access in the descending aorta. Then, the balloon is inflated and gently pulled back across the PDA toward the pulmonary artery. The frame where the balloon is exactly across the PDA is chosen and measurements performed. In conclusion, a new method for PDA measurement in large PDA is reported. The procedure is safe and reliable. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


PubMed | Policlinico San Donato IRCCS
Type: | Journal: Catheterization and cardiovascular interventions : official journal of the Society for Cardiac Angiography & Interventions | Year: 2016

Patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure is a widely performed procedure. Understanding the anatomy is mandatory in order to perform the procedure successfully. The degree of overlap between the septum primum and secundum is called the tunnel. In particular, long and stiff tunnels may prevent the correct positioning of devices that have a fixed distance between the right and left atrial discs.We evaluated retrospectively 361 patients with PFO closure between January 2012 and June 2014 in our institution and were treated due to previous history of ischemic stroke. By TEE, the overlap between septum primum and secundum is usually better seen on the bicaval view that is obtained at 75-90 midesophageal views. Tunnel length and PFO opening were measured. Twelve subjects (median age 35 years; range 30-58 years; three females) showed a long (median 22 mm; range 15-32 mm) and rigid tunnel (median opening 2 mm; range 1-4 mm).Angioplasty of the tunnel was performed by using peripheral angioplasty balloons with a length ranging from 4 to 8 cm and a diameter between 8 and 12 mm. After angioplasty, the tunnel appeared shorter (12 mm; range 8-16 mm) and less rigid (median opening 8 mm; range 7-12 mm). The following devices were implanted: 25 mm Amplatzer PFO occluder in three patients; 25 mm Gore septal occluder in nine subjects. Median fluoroscopy time was 8 min (range 6-10 min). No complications occurred. At a median follow-up of 12 months (range 2-18 months), no problems occurred and all subjects but one (trivial residual shunting) showed a complete closure.Angioplasty of a PFO rigid and stiff tunnel is a feasible and safe option. 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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