IRCCS CROB Hospital

Rionero in Vulture, Italy

IRCCS CROB Hospital

Rionero in Vulture, Italy
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Zannoni G.F.,Catholic University of the Sacred Heart | Improta G.,IRCCS CROB Hospital | Chiarello G.,Catholic University of the Sacred Heart | Pettinato A.,Ospedale Cannizzaro | And 4 more authors.
Virchows Archiv | Year: 2014

Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC) is a subtype of epithelial ovarian cancer with characteristic biological features and aggressive clinical behavior. OCCCs show a pattern of gene mutations different from other type I ovarian malignancies, notably a higher frequency of PIK3CA mutations. In low grade serous ovarian cancer, KRAS and BRAF mutations are frequent, but little data are available on the mutational status of these genes in OCCCs. To clarify this issue, we designed a clinicopathological study with the aim to establish the incidence of KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF hot spot mutations in OCCC. Between December 2006 and June 2012, 22 patients with a proven diagnosis of OCCC were admitted to our Institutions. In all cases, final diagnosis was established according to FIGO and WHO criteria. All women received complete surgical staging. The PyroMark Q24 system (Qiagen GmbH, Hilden, Germany) was used for pyrosequencing analysis of KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF hot spot regions on 2.5-μm sections of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from primary OCCC. Pyrosequencing analysis of KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF hot spot regions revealed the presence of mutations only at codon 12 in exon 2 of KRAS in 3 of 22 (14 %) cases. We found no mutations in the hot spot regions of NRAF (exons 2, 3, 4) or BRAF (exon 15). The median age of women with a KRAS mutated OCCC was 74 years. These OCCC were unilateral FIGO stage IA lesions in two cases associated with foci of endometriosis. We conclude that in 14 % of OCCCs, a KRAS mutation occurs in codon 2 exon 2. NRAS and BRAF mutations were not found. © 2014 Springer-Verlag.


Improta G.,Laboratory of Clinical Research and Molecular Diagnostics | Zupa A.,Laboratory of Clinical Research and Molecular Diagnostics | Possidente L.,Laboratory of Clinical Research and Molecular Diagnostics | Tartarone A.,IRCCS CROB Hospital | And 5 more authors.
Oncology Letters | Year: 2013

Evaluation of the mutational status of KRAS is a crucial step for the correct therapeutic approach in treating advanced colorectal cancer as the identification of wild-type KRAS tumors leads to more specific and less toxic treatments for patients. Although several studies have highlighted the differences between primary and metastatic tumors, the possibility of two or more mutations in the same codon has seldom been reported. The present study reports an additional case of an advanced adenocarcinoma of the colon showing two somatic mutations (p.G12D and p.G12V) in the same codon (codon 12) of exon 2 of the KRAS gene, thus supporting the possibility of two differing clonal origins of the tumor. Although the clinical significance of multiple mutations remains unknown at present, based on the limited data available in the literature, this rare event appears to be associated with a more aggressive disease, as in the present case. This case report demonstrates the existence of intratumoral heterogeneity and the coexistence of distinct clones within a tumor that may have profound clinical implications for disease progression and therapeutic responses.


Salemi M.,University of Catania | Galia A.,Cannizzaro Hospital | Fraggetta F.,Cannizzaro Hospital | La Corte C.,Cannizzaro Hospital | And 5 more authors.
European Journal of Histochemistry | Year: 2013

A genetic background has been implicated in the development of prostate cancer. Protein microarrays have enabled the identification of proteins, some of which associated with apoptosis, that may play a role in the development of such a tumor. Inhibition of apoptosis is a co-factor that contributes to the onset and progression of prostate cancer, though the molecular mechanisms are not entirely understood. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) gene is required for translocation of the apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria to the nucleus. Hence, it is involved in programmed cell death. Different PARP-1 gene expression has been observed in various tumors such as glioblastoma, lung, ovarian, endometrial, and skin cancers. We evaluated the expression of PARP-1 protein in prostatic cancer and normal prostate tissues by immunohistochemistry in 40 men with prostate cancer and in 37 normal men. Positive nuclear PARP-1 staining was found in all samples (normal prostate and prostate cancer tissues). No cytoplasmic staining was observed in any sample. PARP-1-positive cells resulted significantly higher in patients with prostate carcinoma compared with controls (P<0.001). PARP-1 over-expression in prostate cancer tissue compared with normal prostate suggests a greater activity of PARP-1 in these tumors. These findings suggest that PARP-1 expression in prostate cancer is an attempt to trigger apoptosis in this type of tumor similarly to what reported in other cancers. © M. Salemi et al., 2013.


Evaluation of the mutational status of KRAS is a crucial step for the correct therapeutic approach in treating advanced colorectal cancer as the identification of wild-type KRAS tumors leads to more specific and less toxic treatments for patients. Although several studies have highlighted the differences between primary and metastatic tumors, the possibility of two or more mutations in the same codon has seldom been reported. The present study reports an additional case of an advanced adenocarcinoma of the colon showing two somatic mutations (p.G12D and p.G12V) in the same codon (codon 12) of exon 2 of the KRAS gene, thus supporting the possibility of two differing clonal origins of the tumor. Although the clinical significance of multiple mutations remains unknown at present, based on the limited data available in the literature, this rare event appears to be associated with a more aggressive disease, as in the present case. This case report demonstrates the existence of intratumoral heterogeneity and the coexistence of distinct clones within a tumor that may have profound clinical implications for disease progression and therapeutic responses.

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