Irccs Centro Of Riferimento Oncologico

Aviano, Italy

Irccs Centro Of Riferimento Oncologico

Aviano, Italy
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Trama A.,Fondazione IRCCS Instituto Nazionale Dei Tumori | Foschi R.,Fondazione IRCCS Instituto Nazionale Dei Tumori | Larranaga N.,CIBER ISCIII | Sant M.,Fondazione IRCCS Instituto Nazionale Dei Tumori | And 5 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2015

Background We provide updated estimates of survival and survival trends of male genital tumours (prostate, testicular and penis cancers), in Europe and across European areas. Methods The complete approach was used to obtain relative survival estimates for patients diagnosed in 2000-2007, and followed up through 2008 in 29 countries. Data came from 87 cancer registries (CRs) for prostate tumours and from 86 CRs for testis and penis tumours. Relative survival time trends in 1999-2007 were estimated by the period approach. Data came from 49 CRs in 25 countries. Results We analysed 1,021,275 male genital cancer cases. Five-year relative survival was high and decreased with increasing age for all tumours considered. We found limited variation in survival between European regions with Eastern Europe countries having lower survival than the others. Survival for penile cancer patients did not improve from 1999 to 2007. Survival for testicular cancer patients remained stable at high levels since 1999. Survival for prostate cancer patients increased over time. Conclusions Treatment standardisation and centralisation for very rare diseases such as penile cancers or advanced testicular tumours should be supported. The high survival of testicular cancer makes long-term monitoring of testicular cancer survivors necessary and CRs can be an important resource. Prostate cancer patients' survival must be interpreted considering incidence and mortality data. The follow-up of the European Randomised Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer should continue to clarify the impact of screening on prostate cancer mortality together with population based studies including information on stage and treatments. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.All rights reserved.


PubMed | CIBER ISCIII, Irccs Centro Of Riferimento Oncologico, Fondazione IRCCS Instituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Belgian Cancer Registry and 2 more.
Type: | Journal: European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990) | Year: 2015

We provide updated estimates of survival and survival trends of male genital tumours (prostate, testicular and penis cancers), in Europe and across European areas.The complete approach was used to obtain relative survival estimates for patients diagnosed in 2000-2007, and followed up through 2008 in 29 countries. Data came from 87 cancer registries (CRs) for prostate tumours and from 86 CRs for testis and penis tumours. Relative survival time trends in 1999-2007 were estimated by the period approach. Data came from 49 CRs in 25 countries.We analysed 1,021,275 male genital cancer cases. Five-year relative survival was high and decreased with increasing age for all tumours considered. We found limited variation in survival between European regions with Eastern Europe countries having lower survival than the others. Survival for penile cancer patients did not improve from 1999 to 2007. Survival for testicular cancer patients remained stable at high levels since 1999. Survival for prostate cancer patients increased over time.Treatment standardisation and centralisation for very rare diseases such as penile cancers or advanced testicular tumours should be supported. The high survival of testicular cancer makes long-term monitoring of testicular cancer survivors necessary and CRs can be an important resource. Prostate cancer patients survival must be interpreted considering incidence and mortality data. The follow-up of the European Randomised Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer should continue to clarify the impact of screening on prostate cancer mortality together with population based studies including information on stage and treatments.


PubMed | Public Health England, CIBER ISCIII, Irccs Centro Of Riferimento Oncologico, Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and 8 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Cancer epidemiology | Year: 2014

Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a virus-related malignancy which most frequently arises in skin, though visceral sites can also be involved. Infection with Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV or HHV-8) is required for development of KS. Nowadays, most cases worldwide occur in persons who are immunosuppressed, usually because of HIV infection or as a result of therapy to combat rejection of a transplanted organ, but classic Kaposi sarcoma is predominantly a disease of the elderly without apparent immunosuppression. We analyzed 2667 KS incident cases diagnosed during 1995-2002 and registered by 75 population-based European cancer registries contributing to the RARECARE project. Total crude and age-standardized incidence rate was 0.3 per 100,000 per year with an estimated 1642 new cases per year in the EU27 countries. Age-standardized incidence rate was 0.8 per 100,000 in Southern Europe but below 0.3 per 100,000 in all other regions. The elevated rate in southern Europe was attributable to a combination of classic Kaposi sarcoma in some Mediterranean countries and the relatively high incidence of AIDS in several countries. Five-year relative survival for 2000-2002 by the period method was 75%. More than 10,000 persons were estimated to be alive in Europe at the beginning of 2008 with a past diagnosis of KS. The aetiological link with suppressed immunity means that many people alive following diagnosis of KS suffer comorbidity from a pre-existing condition. While KS is a rare cancer, it has a relatively good prognosis and so the number of people affected by it is quite large. Thus it provides a notable example of the importance of networking in diagnosis, therapy and research for rare cancers.


Rossi M.,Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research | Rossi M.,University of Milan | Lugo A.,Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research | Lagiou P.,Harvard University | And 10 more authors.
Annals of Oncology | Year: 2012

Background: Four cohort studies have examined the relation between flavonoids and pancreatic cancer risk providing inconsistent results. Patients and methods: We conducted a case-control study between 1991 and 2008 in Northern Italy. Subjects were 326 cases with incident pancreatic cancer and 652 frequency-matched controls (admitted to the same hospitals as cases for acute non-neoplastic conditions) who answered a reproducible and valid food-frequency questionnaire. We computed odds ratios (ORs) using logistic regression models conditioned on gender, age and study center, and adjusted for education, history of diabetes, tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking and energy intake. Results: Proanthocyanidins with three or more mers were inversely related to pancreatic cancer risk. The ORs were similar in all classes of polymers with three or more mers and in their combination (OR for the highest versus the lowest quintile of intake, 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.24-0.69), and did not substantially change after adjustment for fruit and vegetable consumption, and for vitamin C and folate intakes. Eating an additional portion of fruits rich in proanthocyanidins every day reduced the risk of pancreatic cancer by 25%. Conclusion: Dietary proanthocyanidins-mostly present in apples, pears and pulses-may convey some protection against pancreatic cancer risk. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved.


Piselli P.,Instituto Nazionale Per Le Malattie Infettive L Spallanzani | Serraino D.,Irccs Centro Of Riferimento Oncologico | Segoloni G.P.,Science Nefrologia Dialisi Trapianto | Sandrini S.,Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology and Nephrology | And 13 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2013

To assess incidence and risk factors for de novo cancers (DNCs) after kidney transplant (KT), we carried out a cohort investigation in 15 Italian KT centres. Seven thousand two-hundred seventeen KT recipients (64.2% men), transplanted between 1997 and 2007 and followed-up until 2009, represented the study group. Person years (PY) were computed from 30 days after transplant to cancer diagnosis, death, return to dialysis or to study closure. The number of observed DNCs was compared to that expected in the general population of Italy through standardised incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). To identify risk factors, incidence rate ratios (IRR) were computed. Three-hundred ninety five DNCs were diagnosed during 39.598 PYs, with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD), particularly non-Hodgkin' lymphoma (NHL), lung, kidney and prostate as the most common types. The overall IR was 9.98/1.000 PY, with a 1.7-fold augmented SIR (95% CI: 1.6-1.9). SIRs were particularly elevated for KS (135), lip (9.4), kidney carcinoma (4.9), NHL (4.5) and mesothelioma (4.2). KT recipients born in Southern Italy were at reduced risk of kidney cancer and solid tumors, though at a higher KS risk, than those born in Northern Italy. Use of mTOR inhibitors (mTORi) exerted, for all cancers combined, a 46% significantly reduced risk (95% CI: 0.4-0.7). Our study findings confirmed, in Italy, the increased risks for cancer following KT, and they also suggested a possible protective effect of mTORi in reducing the frequency of post transplant cancers. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Gallus S.,Instituto Of Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri | Turati F.,Instituto Of Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri | Turati F.,University of Milan | Tavani A.,Instituto Of Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri | And 5 more authors.
Cancer Causes and Control | Year: 2011

Soft drinks usually contain sugar and caffeine that might influence pancreatic carcinogenesis. We considered the association between carbonated drink consumption and pancreatic cancer risk in an Italian case-control study conducted in 1991-2008 on 326 pancreatic cancer cases and 652 matched controls. We also combined the results from all the studies on soft drinks or sweetened beverages and pancreatic cancer published before June 2010, using a meta-analytic approach. In the case-control study, compared with non-drinkers, the multivariate odds ratio was 1.02 (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.72-1.44) for carbonated drink consumers and 0.89 (95% CI 0.53-1.50) for regular consumers (at least one drink/day). Besides our study, from the literature search, we identified 4 other case-control (1,919 cases) and 6 cohort studies (2,367 cases). The pooled relative risks (RR) for soft drink consumers vs. non-consumers were 0.97 (95% CI 0.81-1.16) for case-control, 1.05 (95% CI 0.94-1.17) for cohort, and 1.02 (95% CI 0.93-1.12) for all studies. The pooled RRs for heavy drinkers were 1.08 (95% CI 0.73-1.60) for case-control, 1.21 (95% CI 0.90-1.63) for cohort, and 1.16 (95% CI 0.93-1.45) for all studies. In conclusion, soft drink consumption is not materially related to pancreatic cancer risk. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Polesel J.,Irccs Centro Of Riferimento Oncologico | Gheit T.,International Agency for Research on Cancer | Talamini R.,Irccs Centro Of Riferimento Oncologico | Shahzad N.,International Agency for Research on Cancer | And 7 more authors.
British Journal of Cancer | Year: 2012

Background: The association of transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder (TCB) with Schistosoma haematobium suggested a possible role of infections in the aetiology of TCB. Methods: In all, 114 TCB cases and 140 hospital controls from Pordenone Province were enrolled within an Italian multi-centric case-control study. Urine samples were screened for DNA from five human polyomaviruses (HPyV) (JCV, BKV, MCV, WUV, and KIV); SV40; and 22 mucosal human papillomaviruses (HPV) using highly sensitive PCR assays. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding confidence intervals (CIs) were computed for risk of TCB by HPyV-or HPV-positivity using unconditional logistic regression. Results: Human polyomavirus prevalence was similar in TCB cases (71.7%) and controls (77.7%) (OR for TCB=0.85; 95% CI: 0.45-1.61). JCV was the most frequently detected HPyV type. No individual HPyV showed a significant association. Among cases, HPyV-positivity was not associated with tumour characteristics, but it was significantly lower in women than men and among current and former smokers than never smokers. Human papillomavirus was detected in seven cases and five controls (OR=1.52; 95% CI: 0.42-5.45). Conclusion: The present small study does not support an involvement of HPyV or HPV infection in TCB aetiology in immunocompetent individuals. Differences in HPyV-positivity by sex and smoking may derive from differences in either acquisition or persistence of the infection. © 2012 Cancer Research UK All rights reserved.


Pelucchi C.,Irccs Instituto Of Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri | Galeone C.,Irccs Instituto Of Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri | Galeone C.,University of Milan | Polesel J.,Irccs Centro Of Riferimento Oncologico | And 7 more authors.
Pancreas | Year: 2014

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to provide further information on the role of personal characteristics and lifestyle factors, including obesity, diabetes, and tobacco smoking, on survival from pancreatic cancer. METHODS: We obtained follow-up data of pancreatic cancer patients enrolled in 2 Italian case-control studies. Information on characteristics and habits up to the time of diagnosis was collected by trained interviewers. Vital status was ascertained through population registers and record linkage with health system databases. Hazard ratios (HRs) of all-cause mortality and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: Follow-up information was retrieved for 648 cancer patients. Compared with subjects with body mass index of less than 25 kg/m, the HRs were 1.14 (95% CI, 0.94-1.39) for overweight (ie, 25-29.9 kg/m) and 1.32 (95% CI, 0.98-1.79) for obese (ie, ≥30 kg/m) patients (trend P = 0.046). The HRs were 1.37 (95% CI, 1.14-1.65) for ever, 1.30 (95% CI, 1.03-1.65) for ex-smokers, and 1.42 (95% CI, 1.16-1.73) for current versus never smokers. Increasing amount and duration of smoking were associated with reduced survival after pancreatic cancer. No association emerged with diabetes, alcohol consumption, and diet. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking and overweight before diagnosis may play a role in the prognosis of pancreatic cancer, besides its etiology. © 2013 by Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.


PubMed | Irccs Centro Of Riferimento Oncologico, University of Udine and Nephrology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Transplantation proceedings | Year: 2015

Progress in immunosuppressive therapy and perioperative techniques has improved the survivals of both grafts and patients. The patient, however, is exposed to the risks of aging and side effects of immunosuppression. De novo tumors are the 2nd cause of death in the organ transplant population. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the current accepted guidelines for the pre-transplantation study and the post-transplantation follow-up have been effective, in our kidney transplant population, regarding early detection and treatment, improving prognosis, and reducing mortality of some curable neoplastic diseases.We considered de novo tumors in kidney transplant patients from 1995 to 2010 (n= 636) excluding hematologic and nonmelanoma skin tumors from our study.There were 64 de novo tumors in 59 patients out of 636 kidney transplant patients; 29.68% were urogenital cancer, 26.56% gastrointestinal cancer, 12.5% melanoma, 6.25% lung cancer, 6.25% biliopancreatic cancer, 4.68% visceral Kaposi sarcoma, 4.68% breast cancer, 4.68% thyroid cancer, 1 pleural mesothelioma, 1 meningioma, 1 merkeloma. Twenty patients died because of cancer. Ten patients had a late de novo tumor diagnosis, when the stage of tumor was advanced and not suitable for curative treatment.Because of the increased neoplastic risk, we consider it mandatory to carry out a meticulous screening and to implement pre-transplantation study concerning this increased neoplastic risk population to detect a subgroup of patients presenting the highest risk to improve their outcome.


PubMed | Laboratory of Public Health and Population Studies, Instituto Of Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, University of Milan Bicocca, University of Turin and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Cancer epidemiology | Year: 2015

The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether demographics, lifestyle habits, clinical data and alcohol dehydrogenase polymorphisms rs1229984 and rs1573496 associated with first primary head and neck (HNC) are associated with overall survival, recurrence, and second primary cancer (SPC).We conducted a follow-up study in five centres including 801 cases. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for overall survival, recurrence and SPC.Five-years overall survival was 62% for HNC cases, 55% for oral cavity, 53% for oropharynx, 41% for hypopharynx, and 71% for larynx. Predictors of survival were older ages (HR=1.18 for 5 years increase; CI: 1.07-1.30), higher tumour stage (HR=4.16; CI: 2.49-6.96), and high alcohol consumption (HR=3.93; CI: 1.79-8.63). A combined therapy (HR=3.29; CI: 1.18-9.13) was associated with a worst prognosis for oral cavity cancer. The only predictor was higher tumour stage (HR=2.25; CI: 1.26-4.03) for recurrence, and duration of smoking (HR=1.91; CI: 1.00-3.68) for SPC. ADH1B rs1229984 polymorphism HRs for HNC and oesophageal cancer death and for alcohol related cancer death were 0.67 (95% CI: 0.42-1.08), and 0.64 (95% CI: 0.40-1.03), respectively.The survival expectation differs among HNC sites. Increasing age and stage, and high alcohol consumption were unfavourable predictors of HNC survival overall. Duration of tobacco consumption before the first primary tumour was a risk factor for SPC.

Loading Irccs Centro Of Riferimento Oncologico collaborators
Loading Irccs Centro Of Riferimento Oncologico collaborators