Ames, IA, United States
Ames, IA, United States

Iowa State University of Science and Technology, more commonly known as Iowa State University, Iowa State, or ISU, a Land grant of the Iowa university system, is a public land-grant and space-grant research university located in Ames, Iowa, United States. Until 1959 it was known as the Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts.Founded in 1858 and coeducational from its start, Iowa State became the nation’s first designated land-grant institution when the Iowa Legislature accepted the provisions of the 1862 Morrill Act on September 11, 1862, making Iowa the first state in the nation to do so. Iowa State's academic offerings are administered today through eight colleges, including the graduate college, that offer over 100 bachelor's degree programs, 112 master's degree programs, and 83 at the Ph.D. level, plus a professional degree program in Veterinary Medicine.ISU is classified as a Research University with very high research activity by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. The university is a group member of the prestigious American Association of Universities and the Universities Research Association, and a charter member of the Big 12 Conference. Wikipedia.


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Patent
Iowa State University | Date: 2015-02-12

In some examples, a method of forming alane (AlH_(3)), the method comprising reacting one of: 1) a MAlH_(4), wherein M is an alkali metal; 2) alkali-metal hydride, MH; or 3) alkali-metal with one or more aluminum halides (AlX_(3), where X is a halogen), via a mechanochemical process, to form the alane, wherein the reaction is substantially solvent free and carried out in an environment with a temperature between approximately 250 K and approximately 330 K.


Patent
Iowa State University | Date: 2016-10-27

The present invention is directed to polyisocyanates and polyurethanes derived therefrom. In various embodiments, the present invention provides polyisocyanates, methods of making the polyisocyanates from fused bicyclic alcohols, polyurethanes, and methods of making the polyurethanes from the polyisocyanates.


Patent
Iowa State University | Date: 2016-09-29

To better control part quality of 3D printed parts, the temperature of an extruder filament using a secondary heat source is provided. A heat source, such as an infrared heat source, can be used to heat the filament of a 3D printer to the optimum temperature that will enhance welding of the filament to a substrate that it is being printed on or to. Such an optimum temperature can be based upon, in part, the temperature of the substrate. A controller or other intelligent control can be used to receive temperature readings of the substrate and/or filament and then can adjust the temperature of the heating source to optimize the temperature of the filament to better combine the filament to the substrate.


Patent
Iowa State University | Date: 2015-11-12

The present invention is directed to methods and compositions for blocking the effect of the intronic inhibitory splicing region of intron 7 of the SMN2 gene. The compositions and methods of the instant invention include short oligonucleotide reagents (e.g., oligoribonucleotides) that effectively target sites in the SMN2 pre-mRNA, thereby modulating the splicing of SMN2 pre-mRNA to include exon 7 in the processed transcript. The short target regions are 8-mers and 5-mers and also include the identification of a single nucleotide base that is essential for initiating a long distance stearic inhibitory interactions as well as novel targets distant from intron 7 which block the intronic inhibitory splicing of the same. These short target regions and concomitant inhibitory blocking oligonucleotides are less expensive and easier to manufacture and are small enough to cross the blood brain barrier.


Patent
Deere & Company and Iowa State University | Date: 2015-09-24

A method and apparatus estimate yield. A first signal is received that an aggregate yield measured by an aggregate yield sensor during a measurement interval. A second signal is received that indicates a plurality of geo-referenced regions across which a harvester has traveled prior to the measurement interval. The method and apparatus allocate, to each of at least two geo-referenced regions, an aggregate yield portion allocation based upon different travel times for crops to the aggregate yield sensor Visual-Infrared Vegetative Index data derived from sensing of plants in selected portions of the electromagnetic spectrum at a time other than harvest. The aggregate yield portion allocations are output.


Patent
Iowa State University | Date: 2016-11-10

The present invention relates nucleic acid molecules that are modulated (e.g., upregulated) by nitrogen in corn, to proteins or polypeptides encoded by these nucleic acid molecules, and promoters of these nucleic acid molecules. The present invention relates to a nucleic acid construct having a nucleic acid molecule that is modulated by nitrogen in corn, as well as to expression systems, host cells, plants, and plant seeds having the nucleic acid construct. The present invention also relates to a method of expressing the nucleic acid molecule that is modulated by nitrogen in a plant by growing a transgenic plant or a plant grown from a transgenic seed transformed with the construct. The present invention further relates to an isolated DNA promoter that can be used to direct nitrogen-regulated expression of an isolated nucleic acid in plants.


Patent
Boehringer Ingelheim and Iowa State University | Date: 2016-08-31

The present invention relates to a vaccine for protecting a piglet against diseases associated with a novel pestivirus. The vaccine commonly includes a pestivirus antigen and, optionally an adjuvant. Methods for protecting pigs against diseases associated with pestivirus, including but not limited to congenital tremors and methods of producing the pestivirus vaccine are also provided.


Johnston D.C.,Iowa State University
Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics | Year: 2017

The influence of uniaxial single-ion anisotropy -DSz2 on the magnetic and thermal properties of Heisenberg antiferromagnets (AFMs) is investigated. The uniaxial anisotropy is treated exactly and the Heisenberg interactions are treated within unified molecular field theory (MFT) [Phys. Rev. B 91, 064427 (2015)PRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.91.064427], where thermodynamic variables are expressed in terms of directly measurable parameters. The properties of collinear AFMs with ordering along the z axis (D>0) in applied field Hz=0 are calculated versus D and temperature T, including the ordered moment μ, the Néel temperature TN, the magnetic entropy, internal energy, heat capacity, and the anisotropic magnetic susceptibilities χ and χ in the paramagnetic (PM) and AFM states. The high-field average magnetization per spin μz(Hz,D,T) is found, and the critical field Hc(D,T) is derived at which the second-order AFM to PM phase transition occurs. The magnetic properties of the spin-flop (SF) phase are calculated, including the zero-field properties TN(D) and μ(D,T). The high-field μz(Hz,D,T) is determined, together with the associated spin-flop field HSF(D,T) at which a second-order SF to PM phase transition occurs. The free energies of the AFM, SF, and PM phases are derived from which Hz-T phase diagrams are constructed. For fJ=-1 and -0.75, where fJ=θpJ/TNJ and θpJ and TNJ are the Weiss temperature in the Curie-Weiss law and the Néel temperature due to exchange interactions alone, respectively, phase diagrams in the Hz-T plane similar to previous results are obtained. However, for fJ=0 we find a topologically different phase diagram where a spin-flop bubble with PM and AFM boundaries occurs at finite Hz and T. Also calculated are properties arising from a perpendicular magnetic field, including the perpendicular susceptibility χ(D,T), the associated effective torque at low fields arising from the -DSz2 term in the Hamiltonian, the high-field perpendicular magnetization μ, and the perpendicular critical field Hc at which the second-order AFM to PM phase transition occurs. In addition to the above results for D>0, the TN(D) and ordered moment μ(T,D) for collinear AFM ordering along the x axis with D<0 are determined. In order to compare the properties of the above spin systems with those of noninteracting systems with -DSz2 uniaxial anisotropy with either sign of D, Supplemental Material is provided in which results for the thermal and magnetic properties of such noninteracting spin systems are given. © 2017 American Physical Society.


Toth A.L.,Iowa State University | Rehan S.M.,University of New Hampshire
Annual Review of Entomology | Year: 2017

The evolution of eusociality is a perennial issue in evolutionary biology, and genomic advances have fueled steadily growing interest in the genetic changes underlying social evolution. Along with a recent flurry of research on comparative and evolutionary genomics in different eusocial insect groups (bees, ants, wasps, and termites), several mechanistic explanations have emerged to describe the molecular evolution of eusociality from solitary behavior. These include solitary physiological ground plans, genetic toolkits of deeply conserved genes, evolutionary changes in protein-coding genes, cis regulation, and the structure of gene networks, epigenetics, and novel genes. Despite this proliferation of ideas, there has been little synthesis, even though these ideas are not mutually exclusive and may in fact be complementary. We review available data on molecular evolution of insect sociality and highlight key biotic and abiotic factors influencing social insect genomes. We then suggest both phylogenetic and ecological evolutionary developmental biology (eco-evo-devo) perspectives for a more synthetic view of molecular evolution in insect societies. © 2017 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Li Y.,Iowa State University
Few-Body Systems | Year: 2017

We study heavy quarkonium within the light-front Hamiltonian formalism. Our effective Hamiltonian is based on the holographic QCD confining potential and the one-gluon exchange interaction with a running coupling. The obtained spectra are compared with experimental measurements. We present a set of light-front wave functions, which exhibit rich structure and are consistent with the nonrelativistic picture. Finally, we use the wave functions to compute the charge and mass radii. © 2017, Springer-Verlag Wien.


Zhang Y.,University of California at Riverside | Miller G.J.,Iowa State University | Fokwa B.P.T.,University of California at Riverside
Chemistry of Materials | Year: 2017

The prolific Ti3Co5B2 structure type has produced exciting materials with tunable magnetic properties, ranging from soft magnetic Ti2FeRh5B2, to semihard magnetic Ti2FeRu4RhB2 and hard magnetic Sc2FeRu3Ir2B2. Density functional theory (DFT) was employed to investigate their spin-orbit coupling effect, spin exchange, and magnetic dipole-dipole interactions in order to understand their magnetic anisotropy and relate it to their various coercivities, with the objective of being able to predict new materials with large magnetic anisotropy. Our calculations show that the contribution of magnetic dipole-dipole interactions to the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) in Ti3Co5B2-type compounds is much weaker than the spin-orbit coupling effect, and Sc2FeRu3Ir2B2 has, by far, the largest MAE and strong intrachain and interchain Fe-Fe spin exchange coupling, thus confirming its hard magnetic properties. We then targeted materials containing the more earth-abundant and less expensive Co, instead of Rh, Ru or Ir, so that our study started with Ti3Co5B2, which we found to be nonmagnetic. In the next step, substitutions on the Ti sites in Ti3Co5B2 led to new potential quaternary phases with the general formula T2T′Co5B2 (T = Ti, Hf; T′ = Mn, Fe). For Hf2MnCo5B2, we found a large MAE (+0.96 meV/f.u.) but relatively weak interchain Mn-Mn spin exchange interactions, whereas for Hf2FeCo5B2, there is a relatively smaller MAE (+0.17 meV/f.u.) but strong Fe-Fe interchain and intrachain spin exchange interactions. Therefore, these two Co-rich phases are predicted to be new rare-earth-free, semihard to hard magnetic materials. © 2016 American Chemical Society.


Lyte M.,Iowa State University
Microbiology Spectrum | Year: 2016

Microbial endocrinology represents the intersection of two seemingly disparate fields, microbiology and neurobiology, and is based on the shared presence of neurochemicals that are exactly the same in host as well as in the microorganism. The ability of microorganisms to not only respond to, but also produce, many of the same neurochemicals that are produced by the host, such as during periods of stress, has led to the introduction of this evolutionary-based mechanism which has a role in the pathogenesis of infectious disease. The consideration of microbial endocrinology-based mechanisms has demonstrated, for example, that the prevalent use of catecholamine-based synthetic drugs in the clinical setting contributes to the formation of biofilms in indwelling medical devices. Production of neurochemicals by microorganisms most often employs the same biosynthetic pathways as those utilized by the host, indicating that acquisition of host neurochemical-based signaling system in the host may have been acquired due to lateral gene transfer from microorganisms. That both host and microorganism produce and respond to the very same neurochemicals means that there is bidirectionality contained with the theoretical underpinnings of microbial endocrinology. This can be seen in the role of microbial endocrinology in the microbiota-gut-brain axis and its relevance to infectious disease. Such shared pathways argue for a role of microorganism-neurochemical interactions in infectious disease. © 2016 American Society for Microbiology. All rights reserved.


Thompson K.J.,Iowa State University
Library Resources and Technical Services | Year: 2016

With the adoption of FRAD and RDA, the scope of name authority records has broadened from a record supporting an authorized heading to a fuller description of a creator. Meant to help user discovery of resources, these practices are problematic when the record describes an author who self-identifies as trans. In this research, name authority records (NARs) for self-identified trans creators were analyzed. This analysis examined the 375 field for "gender," the contents of that field, and other representations of (trans)gender identities throughout the record. Name authority record creation practices should be examined to ensure that an author's agency to self-disclose their identities is respected.


Welk G.J.,Iowa State University
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise | Year: 2017

INTRODUCTION: Calibration equations offer potential to improve the accuracy and utility of self-report measures of physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) by re-scaling potentially biased estimates. The present study evaluates calibration models designed to estimate PA and SB in a representative sample of adults from the Physical Activity Measurement Survey (PAMS). METHODS: Participants in the PAMS project completed replicate single day trials that involved wearing a Sensewear armband (SWA) monitor for 24 hours followed by a telephone administered 24-hour physical activity recall (PAR). Comprehensive statistical model selection and validation procedures were used to develop and test separate calibration models designed to predict objectively-measured SB and moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA from self-reported PAR data. Equivalence testing was used to evaluate the equivalence of the model-predicted values with the objective measures in a separate holdout sample. RESULTS: The final prediction model for both SB and MVPA included reported time spent in SB and MVPA, as well as terms capturing sex, age, education, and BMI. Cross-validation analyses on an independent sample exhibited high correlations with observed SB (r = 0.72) and MVPA (r = 0.75). Equivalence testing demonstrated that the model-predicted values were statistically equivalent to the corresponding objective values for both SB and MVPA. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate that simple regression models can be used to statistically adjust for over or underestimation in self-report measures among different segments of the population. The models produced group estimates from the PAR that were statistically equivalent to the observed time spent in SB and MVPA obtained from the objective SWA monitor; however additional work is needed to correct for estimates of individual behavior. © 2017 American College of Sports Medicine


Meyendorf N.,Iowa State University
AIP Conference Proceedings | Year: 2017

Lightweight components for transportation and aerospace applications are designed for an estimated lifecycle, taking expected mechanical and environmental loads into account. The main reason for catastrophic failure of components within the expected lifecycle are material inhomogeneities, like pores and inclusions as origin for fatigue cracks, that have not been detected by NDE. However, material degradation by designed or unexpected loading conditions or environmental impacts can accelerate the crack initiation or growth. Conventional NDE methods are usually able to detect cracks that are formed at the end of the degradation process, but methods for early detection of fatigue, creep, and corrosion are still a matter of research. For conventional materials ultrasonic, electromagnetic, or thermographic methods have been demonstrated as promising. Other approaches are focused to surface damage by using optical methods or characterization of the residual surface stresses that can significantly affect the creation of fatigue cracks. For conventional metallic materials, material models for nucleation and propagation of damage have been successfully applied for several years. Material microstructure/property relations are well established and the effect of loading conditions on the component life can be simulated. For advanced materials, for example carbon matrix composites or ceramic matrix composites, the processes of nucleation and propagation of damage is still not fully understood. For these materials NDE methods can not only be used for the periodic inspections, but can significantly contribute to the material scientific knowledge to understand and model the behavior of composite materials. © 2017 Author(s).


Holland S.D.,Iowa State University
AIP Conference Proceedings | Year: 2017

As quantitative NDE has matured and entered the mainstream, it has created an industry need for engineers who can select, evaluate, and qualify NDE techniques to satisfy quantitative engineering requirements. NDE as a field is cross-disciplinary with major NDE techniques relying on a broad spectrum of physics disciplines including fluid mechanics, electromagnetics, mechanical waves, and high energy physics. An NDE engineer needs broad and deep understanding of the measurement physics across modalities, a general engineering background, and familiarity with shop-floor practices and tools. While there are a wide range of certification and training programs worldwide for NDE technicians, there are few programs aimed at engineers. At the same time, substantial demographic shifts are underway with many experienced NDE engineers and technicians nearing retirement, and with new generations coming from much more diverse backgrounds. There is a need for more and better education opportunities for NDE engineers. Both teaching and learning NDE engineering are inherently challenging because of the breadth and depth of knowledge required. At the same time, sustaining the field in a more diverse era will require broadening participation of previously underrepresented groups. The QNDE 2016 conference in Atlanta, GA included a session on NDE education, training, and diversity. This paper summarizes the outcomes and discussion from this session. © 2017 Author(s).


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

AMES, Iowa - NASA's SOFIA aircraft, a 747 loaded with a 2.5-meter telescope in the back and stripped of most creature comforts in the front, took a big U-turn over the Pacific west of Mexico. The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy aircraft was just beginning the second half of an overnight mission on Jan. 28, 2015. It turned north for a flight all the way to western Oregon, then back home to NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center in Palmdale, California. Along the way, pilots steered the plane to aim the telescope at a nearby star. Iowa State University's Massimo Marengo and other astronomers were on board to observe the mission and collect infrared data about the star. That star is called epsilon Eridani. It's about 10 light years away from the sun. It's similar to our sun, but one-fifth the age. And astronomers believe it can tell them a lot about the development of our solar system. Marengo, an Iowa State associate professor of physics and astronomy, and other astronomers have been studying the star and its planetary system since 2004. In a 2009 scientific paper, the astronomers used data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope to describe the star's disk of fine dust and debris left over from the formation of planets and the collisions of asteroids and comets. They reported the disk contained separate belts of asteroids, similar to the asteroid and Kuiper belts of our solar system. Subsequent studies by other astronomers questioned that finding. A new scientific paper, just published online by The Astronomical Journal, uses SOFIA and Spitzer data to confirm there are separate inner and outer disk structures. The astronomers report further studies will have to determine if the inner disk includes one or two debris belts. Kate Su, an associate astronomer at the University of Arizona and the university's Steward Observatory, is the paper's lead author. Marengo is one of the paper's nine co-authors. Marengo said the findings are important because they confirm epsilon Eridani is a good model of the early days of our solar system and can provide hints at how our solar system evolved. "This star hosts a planetary system currently undergoing the same cataclysmic processes that happened to the solar system in its youth, at the time in which the moon gained most of its craters, Earth acquired the water in its oceans, and the conditions favorable for life on our planet were set," Marengo wrote in a summary of the project. A major contributor to the new findings was data taken during that January 2015 flight of SOFIA. Marengo joined Su on the cold and noisy flight at 45,000 feet, above nearly all of the atmospheric water vapor that absorbs the infrared light that astronomers need to see planets and planetary debris. Determining the structure of the disk was a complex effort that took several years and detailed computer modeling. The astronomers had to separate the faint emission of the disk from the much brighter light coming from the star. "But we can now say with great confidence that there is a separation between the star's inner and outer belts," Marengo said. "There is a gap most likely created by planets. We haven't detected them yet, but I would be surprised if they are not there. Seeing them will require using the next-generation instrumentation, perhaps NASA's 6.5-meter James Webb Space Telescope scheduled for launch in October 2018." That's a lot of time and attention on one nearby star and its debris disk. But Marengo said it really is taking astronomers back in time. "The prize at the end of this road is to understand the true structure of epsilon Eridani's out-of-this-world disk, and its interactions with the cohort of planets likely inhabiting its system," Marengo wrote in a newsletter story about the project. "SOFIA, by its unique ability of capturing infrared light in the dry stratospheric sky, is the closest we have to a time machine, revealing a glimpse of Earth's ancient past by observing the present of a nearby young sun."


News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

(Iowa State University) New research by an Iowa State University professor of management examines how competing interests within an organization can limit egregious unethical behavior. David King says there needs to be a restructuring of corporate governance, so more people are at the table making decisions.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

We need to consider the possible consequences of our 24-7 reliance on digital technology, warns a new book. Our dependence on our phones, tablets, and laptops has dramatically changed how we communicate and interact, and is slowly eroding some of our core principles, says Michael Bugeja, professor and director of the Greenlee School of Journalism and Communication at Iowa State University. Bugeja is not advocating against technology—in fact, he relies on it for his work and personal life. But in his forthcoming book, Interpersonal Divide in the Age of the Machine (Oxford University Press, 2017), Bugeja explores what might happen if we allow machines to dictate our life. Those machines range from smartphones to robotics to virtual reality. Bugeja theorizes that because of our reliance on machines, we will start to develop the universal principles of technology, such as urgency, a need for constant updates, and a loss of privacy. “We are losing empathy, compassion, truth-telling, fairness, and responsibility and replacing them with all these machine values,” Bugeja says. “If we embed ourselves in technology, what happens to those universal principles that have stopped wars and elevated human consciousness and conscience above more primitive times in history?” Bugeja warns of the dangers associated with adopting these values. The proliferation of fake news is just one example of how this shift is already influencing our culture. Technology provides a continuous connection to our social media feeds, which has become a popular source for news for many Americans. However, social media tends to cultivate news stories that reflect our individual beliefs and values—not a broad spectrum of viewpoints—and is an easy way for fake news stories to spread, Bugeja says. “The business of journalism is already feeling the effect of living in a world of correlation without causation,” he says. “We understand what happened and how it happened, but we don’t understand why it happened.” That’s why Bugeja wants colleges and universities to require students to take media and technology literacy courses. He says it is important that students know where to go to find credible news stories, and open their minds to information from a variety of sources, not just those that confirm what they already think or believe. “We need these courses so that people know where to go for facts and how to deal with technology. If you do not assert yourself over technology, it will assert itself over you and you will be doing what the machine asks you, rather than you telling the machine what to do,” Bugeja says. There is no easy short-term fix for the future, Bugeja says, which is why we need to temper our use. He says the long-term solution is through education. It is not just the philosophical and intellectual consequences that have Bugeja concerned, but also the impact of technology on business, behavior, and everyday activities. Business and industry increasingly rely on machines or robots to do the jobs of humans. Bugeja says this shift can improve efficiency, safety, and the company’s bottom line, but he questions what will happen to those individuals who lose their jobs to machines. “We introduce new gadgets by saying they will make our lives better, which is true, but there are also dangers,” Bugeja says.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

Gird your gourds. A deadly bacterium transmitted via beetle poop is threatening bright blossoms and bulbous vegetables in the U.S. By the time yellowing leaves and signs of wilting become apparent it is already too late. At that point infected pumpkins, melons, cucumbers or squash plants can only be isolated in hope of minimizing the damage. Crop yield losses can be as high as 80 percent. The killer, a bacterium called Erwinia tracheiphila, was first described in scientific literature some 120 years ago when it was reported in cucumber, melon and winter squash fields in Michigan. But now the increasing acreage of these plants, along with the practice of sowing more fields with one or a few crops—rather than a wide variety—appear to have helped the microbe gain traction. It is currently being blamed for tens of millions of dollars in losses each year. “To be honest, it’s in every field I go to in the Northeast and mid-Atlantic, unless the plants are completely doused in pesticides,” says Lori Shapiro, an evolutionary ecologist who researches the involved bacterium at North Carolina State and Harvard universities. These virulent microbes have also taken out gourds and melons across Kentucky and Iowa. Agricultural experts remain concerned the bacterium might creep into new areas like the southeastern or southwestern U.S. as well as Mexico—and wonder if it already has. Such hazards are rekindling interest in studying this killer bacterium. And recent discoveries by Shapiro and colleagues are providing fresh insights into how these microbes hijack their hosts and manipulate insect behavior to help E. tracheiphila proliferate. Armed with this information, farmers and researchers hope they might be able to develop some new weapons against this stealthy scourge. In many ways the microbe’s rise is an exquisite evolutionary feat. These pernicious pests catch a ride to gourds and other hosts such as cantaloupe and honeydew melon, courtesy of beetle excrement. When beetles nibble on leaves and then deposit their feces there, the bacteria jump from poop to plant. They enter their victim via the fresh, bite-induced wounds produced by their grazing hosts. Then they hole up inside the plant’s veins, multiplying and forming a slimy mass that obstructs water from moving through its vasculature. The blockage desiccates and kills the gourd—much in the same way a blockage in a human vein might lead to heart failure or coronary heart disease, Shapiro explains. “If our arteries are clogged by plaque and blood can’t get through, you may die. Similarly, the xylem (veins) are blocked here so that the plant collapses and dies—although the time scales are a bit different. In both cases the vasculature no longer works.” The obstruction leaves the plants with an unquenchable thirst. No matter how much water a farmer might provide, once the bacteria have a foothold it will never be enough, says Mark Gleason, a plant pathologist at Iowa State University. “It’s pretty much a death sentence. No water can flow. Sometimes they recover at night and look better, but that’s just an intermediate stage,” he says. The victim will be dead within about two weeks, depending on the temperature. Right now, options to stop these microbial attackers are few: The bacteria do not survive on plant surfaces, so they cannot be targeted there. The only consistent defense is attacking the beetle carriers—preemptively applying neonicotinoid pesticides to plants to prevent beetles from feeding on them and depositing the bacteria. The catch is that these bug killers have also been shown to harm the bees that would otherwise help pollinate those same plants, says Andrew Stephenson, an evolutionary ecologist at The Pennsylvania State University. Using pesticides in a way that minimizes damage to bees remains challenging, Stephenson notes. Moreover, regularly applying such chemicals can be expensive—and is obviously not an option for organic farmers. (Many organic farmers use row covers to physically separate beetles from plants, but that is an expensive and cumbersome solution.) With pesticides, “I would say we are using a sledgehammer to defeat a fly, and we need something a bit more attuned and effective,” Gleason agrees. Bee harm is also at the heart of a current debate at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency about restricting pesticide use during plant flowering to avoid inadvertently killing pollinators. The issue has fomented risk assessments along with some limited new policies, but environmental groups are hoping for more controls. “It seems unlikely that [such] regulation will be enacted in the next couple of years, but if it ever is, that would likely mean that chemical pesticides would be useless for controlling vector populations,” ecologist Shapiro says. In their search for solutions Shapiro and colleagues have in recent years turned to E. tracheiphila’s genome and the ways the bacterium influences beetle behavior. The researchers have already uncovered some surprising insights. In September 2012 Shapiro and researchers at Penn State found beetles actually preferred to sup on plants already infected with the bacterium. They discovered infected plants give off volatile compounds that apparently smell delicious to the bugs—attracting them to feed and forcing the plant to become a party to its own demise. The microbe has other tricks, too. To help ensure the beetles will stay, dine and deposit feces, the bacterium also degrades its host’s natural defenses—making the plant even more alluring for still more beetles. Infected gourds and melons apparently produce less of a gummy sap that would otherwise leave a beetle’s mouth feeling too sticky to keep eating. Scientists are unsure why there is less of the sticky stuff in infected plants, but one leading hypothesis is that the reduced water flow reduces that syrupy supply. Beyond breaking down beetle behavior, Shapiro and colleagues are also scouring the E. tracheiphila genome, looking for virulence genes that have helped make the microbe a better killer. Her team published findings last year that suggest the bacterium has only recently started consistently preying upon these crops. Writing in Genome Biology and Evolution, they pointed to the fact that more than 20 percent of the pathogen’s genome is composed of nonfunctioning genes—pseudogenes that do not appear to be doing important work. This suggests the microbe’s focus on these plants must have been relatively recent on the evolutionary scale because those nonfunctional genes would likely have been eliminated as negative pressure pushed them out over time, the authors wrote. The team hypothesizes the leap to these crops from a different ecological niche—and subsequent genomic changes—may have been influenced by the large-scale single-crop farming practices that have proliferated across the U.S. That, in combination with beetles being easily able to flit from one plant to its neighbor, may have lit the match for this threat, they suggest. But what can be done? One path may be trying to identify resistance genes, Gleason says. Researchers do not know why the blight has apparently not spread to (or at least not been detected) in Texas or California, even though there are available crops and possible bug carriers in those states. These factors suggest there may be some genetic resistance or other factors about potential beetle carriers that could be explored. For now, however, Shapiro and colleagues have put out a call to citizen scientists and farmers, asking them to send in sick gourd and melon plants (those that do not rebound after watering). More widespread E. tracheiphila samples, they hope, will allow them to better understand the full range of this bacterium and launch further genomic studies. Perhaps then, we can better prepare pumpkins and other plants for future attacks.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

NASA's SOFIA aircraft, a 747 loaded with a 2.5-meter telescope in the back and stripped of most creature comforts in the front, took a big U-turn over the Pacific west of Mexico. The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy aircraft was just beginning the second half of an overnight mission on Jan. 28, 2015. It turned north for a flight all the way to western Oregon, then back home to NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center in Palmdale, California. Along the way, pilots steered the plane to aim the telescope at a nearby star. Iowa State University's Massimo Marengo and other astronomers were on board to observe the mission and collect infrared data about the star. That star is called epsilon Eridani. It's about 10 light years away from the sun. It's similar to our sun, but one-fifth the age. And astronomers believe it can tell them a lot about the development of our solar system. Marengo, an Iowa State associate professor of physics and astronomy, and other astronomers have been studying the star and its planetary system since 2004. In a 2009 scientific paper, the astronomers used data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope to describe the star's disk of fine dust and debris left over from the formation of planets and the collisions of asteroids and comets. They reported the disk contained separate belts of asteroids, similar to the asteroid and Kuiper belts of our solar system. Subsequent studies by other astronomers questioned that finding. A new scientific paper, just published online by The Astronomical Journal, uses SOFIA and Spitzer data to confirm there are separate inner and outer disk structures. The astronomers report further studies will have to determine if the inner disk includes one or two debris belts. Kate Su, an associate astronomer at the University of Arizona and the university's Steward Observatory, is the paper's lead author. Marengo is one of the paper's nine co-authors. Marengo said the findings are important because they confirm epsilon Eridani is a good model of the early days of our solar system and can provide hints at how our solar system evolved. "This star hosts a planetary system currently undergoing the same cataclysmic processes that happened to the solar system in its youth, at the time in which the moon gained most of its craters, Earth acquired the water in its oceans, and the conditions favorable for life on our planet were set," Marengo wrote in a summary of the project. A major contributor to the new findings was data taken during that January 2015 flight of SOFIA. Marengo joined Su on the cold and noisy flight at 45,000 feet, above nearly all of the atmospheric water vapor that absorbs the infrared light that astronomers need to see planets and planetary debris. Determining the structure of the disk was a complex effort that took several years and detailed computer modeling. The astronomers had to separate the faint emission of the disk from the much brighter light coming from the star. "But we can now say with great confidence that there is a separation between the star's inner and outer belts," Marengo said. "There is a gap most likely created by planets. We haven't detected them yet, but I would be surprised if they are not there. Seeing them will require using the next-generation instrumentation, perhaps NASA's 6.5-meter James Webb Space Telescope scheduled for launch in October 2018." That's a lot of time and attention on one nearby star and its debris disk. But Marengo said it really is taking astronomers back in time. "The prize at the end of this road is to understand the true structure of epsilon Eridani's out-of-this-world disk, and its interactions with the cohort of planets likely inhabiting its system," Marengo wrote in a newsletter story about the project. "SOFIA, by its unique ability of capturing infrared light in the dry stratospheric sky, is the closest we have to a time machine, revealing a glimpse of Earth's ancient past by observing the present of a nearby young sun."


News Article | April 11, 2017
Site: www.cemag.us

Researchers looking for ways to regenerate nerves can have a hard time obtaining key tools of their trade. Schwann cells are an example. They form sheaths around axons, the tail-like parts of nerve cells that carry electrical impulses. They promote regeneration of those axons. And they secrete substances that promote the health of nerve cells. In other words, they’re very useful to researchers hoping to regenerate nerve cells, specifically peripheral nerve cells, those cells outside the brain and spinal cord. But Schwann cells are hard to come by in useful numbers. So researchers have been taking readily available and noncontroversial mesenchymal stem cells (also called bone marrow stromal stem cells that can form bone, cartilage and fat cells) and using a chemical process to turn them, or as researchers say, differentiate them into Schwann cells. But it’s an arduous, step-by-step and expensive process. Researchers at Iowa State University are exploring what they hope will be a better way to transform those stem cells into Schwann-like cells. They’ve developed a nanotechnology that uses inkjet printers to print multi-layer graphene circuits and also uses lasers to treat and improve the surface structure and conductivity of those circuits. It turns out mesenchymal stem cells adhere and grow well on the treated circuit’s raised, rough and 3D nanostructures. Add small doses of electricity — 100 millivolts for 10 minutes per day over 15 days — and the stem cells become Schwann-like cells. The researchers’ findings are featured on the front cover of the scientific journal Advanced Healthcare Materials. Jonathan Claussen, an Iowa State assistant professor of mechanical engineering and an associate of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory, is lead author. Suprem Das, a postdoctoral research associate in mechanical engineering and an associate of the Ames Laboratory; and Metin Uz, a postdoctoral research associate in chemical and biological engineering, are first authors. The project is supported by funds from the Roy J. Carver Charitable Trust, the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Iowa State’s College of Engineering, the department of mechanical engineering and the Carol Vohs Johnson Chair in Chemical and Biological Engineering held by Surya Mallapragada, an Anson Marston Distinguished Professor in Engineering, an associate of the Ames Laboratory and a paper co-author. “This technology could lead to a better way to differentiate stem cells,” Uz says. “There is huge potential here.” The electrical stimulation is very effective, differentiating 85 percent of the stem cells into Schwann-like cells compared to 75 percent by the standard chemical process, according to the research paper. The electrically differentiated cells also produced 80 nanograms per milliliter of nerve growth factor compared to 55 nanograms per milliliter for the chemically treated cells. The researchers report the results could lead to changes in how nerve injuries are treated inside the body. “These results help pave the way for in vivo peripheral nerve regeneration where the flexible graphene electrodes could conform to the injury site and provide intimate electrical stimulation for nerve cell regrowth,” the researchers wrote in a summary of their findings. The paper reports several advantages to using electrical stimulation to differentiate stem cells into Schwann-like cells: A key to making it all work is a graphene inkjet printing process developed in Claussen’s research lab. The process takes advantages of graphene’s wonder-material properties — it’s a great conductor of electricity and heat, it’s strong, stable and biocompatible — to produce low-cost, flexible and even wearable electronics. But there was a problem: once graphene electronic circuits were printed, they had to be treated to improve electrical conductivity. That usually meant high temperatures or chemicals. Either could damage flexible printing surfaces including plastic films or paper. Claussen and his research group solved the problem by developing computer-controlled laser technology that selectively irradiates inkjet-printed graphene oxide. The treatment removes ink binders and reduces graphene oxide to graphene – physically stitching together millions of tiny graphene flakes. The process makes electrical conductivity more than a thousand times better. The collaboration of Claussen’s group of nanoengineers developing printed graphene technologies and Mallapragada’s group of chemical engineers working on nerve regeneration began with some informal conversations on campus. That led to experimental attempts to grow stem cells on printed graphene and then to electrical stimulation experiments. “We knew this would be a really good platform for electrical stimulation,” Das says. “But we didn’t know it would differentiate these cells.” But now that it has, the researchers say there are new possibilities to think about. The technology, for example, could one day be used to create dissolvable or absorbable nerve regeneration materials that could be surgically placed in a person’s body and wouldn’t require a second surgery to remove.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: phys.org

Our dependence on these gadgets has dramatically changed how we communicate and interact, and is slowly eroding some of our core principles, said Michael Bugeja, professor and director of the Greenlee School of Journalism and Communication at Iowa State University. Bugeja is not advocating against technology – in fact, he relies on it for his work and personal life – but he says we need to recognize the possible ramifications before it is too late. In his forthcoming book, "Interpersonal Divide in the Age of the Machine," Bugeja explores what might happen if we allow machines to dictate our life. Those machines range from smartphones to robotics to virtual reality. Bugeja theorizes that because of our reliance on machines, we will start to develop the universal principles of technology, such as urgency, a need for constant updates and a loss of privacy. "We are losing empathy, compassion, truth-telling, fairness and responsibility and replacing them with all these machine values," Bugeja said. "If we embed ourselves in technology, what happens to those universal principles that have stopped wars and elevated human consciousness and conscience above more primitive times in history?" Need for media and technology literacy Bugeja warns of the dangers associated with adopting these values. The proliferation of fake news is just one example of how this shift is already influencing our culture. Technology provides a continuous connection to our social media feeds, which has become a popular source for news for many Americans. However, social media tends to cultivate news stories that reflect our individual beliefs and values – not a broad spectrum of viewpoints – and is an easy way for fake news stories to spread, Bugeja said. "The business of journalism is already feeling the effect of living in a world of correlation without causation," he said. "We understand what happened and how it happened, but we don't understand why it happened." That's why Bugeja wants colleges and universities to require students take media and technology literacy courses. He says it is important that students know where to go to find credible news stories, and open their minds to information from a variety of sources, not just those that confirm what they already think or believe. "We need these courses so that people know where to go for facts and how to deal with technology. If you do not assert yourself over technology, it will assert itself over you and you will be doing what the machine asks you, rather than you telling the machine what to do," Bugeja said. There is no easy short-term fix for the future, Bugeja said, which is why we need to temper our use. He says the long-term solution is through education. It is not just the philosophical and intellectual consequences that have Bugeja concerned, but also the impact of technology on business, behavior and everyday activities. Business and industry increasingly rely on machines or robots to do the jobs of humans. Bugeja says this shift can improve efficiency, safety and the company's bottom line, but he questions what will happen to those individuals who lose their jobs to machines. Working at a university, Bugeja has witnessed how machines have altered behavior in the classroom, dining hall or when walking across campus. Technology is a distraction that keeps students from focusing on their studies and limits interpersonal interactions, he said. In much the same way, the temptation of responding to an alert from social media or notification of a text message while driving has increased safety concerns. "We introduce new gadgets by saying they will make our lives better, which is true, but there are also dangers," Bugeja said. The purpose of his latest book is to raise awareness about the dangers of living in a world dominated by machines. He challenges readers, just as he does with students in his class, to balance their use of technology and not feel pressured to respond immediately to an email or text message. The book, published by Oxford University Press, will be available in July. Explore further: Time to change how news media cover mass shootings, says psychologist


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The phrase "a double-edged sword" describes something that is beneficial in some ways but problematic in others. One example is removing maize stover (the husks, stems and leaves of corn plants) from fields. Maize stover is used to make cellulosic ethanol, a renewable biofuel. And renewable biofuels are beneficial to the environment. However, removing the stover can harm the environment because it can cause the soil to erode and lose nutrients. Taking up this double-edged sword is Cynthia Bartel, a doctoral candidate at Iowa State University. She's finding a way to lessen the harm and increase the benefits of removing maize stover. "While water and wind erosion are substantial problems for maize stover removal, soil quality preservation is an even greater constraint," she explained. Bartel needed to find a way to remove the stover but preserve the soil quality. So, she turned to previous research for ideas and found that cover or companion crops can improve soil quality. Bartel liked the idea of using cover crops, but was curious about a different type of cover crop. Instead of annual cover crops, which must be replanted every year, Bartel continued research at Iowa State University (ISU) involving perennial groundcover, and specifically grasses. "We envision that perennial grass seed might need to be purchased and planted only every four to five years, which would greatly reduce expenses compared to annual covers." Using a perennial groundcover could be a win-win, including natural resources preservation in addition to reducing costs. However, Bartel needed to determine if perennial groundcover and maize are compatible. She also needed to determine if using a perennial groundcover crop is both environmentally and economically beneficial. To explore these questions, the ISU team conducted a field study at two locations in Iowa. In some areas, they planted Kentucky bluegrass with the maize. In other areas, they planted creeping red fescue with the maize. The team closely monitored and analyzed the crops over two years. "The success of the system largely depends on using a compatible species," she explained. And compatibility depends on several factors. A compatible grass would easily and reliably grow in the area where it is planted. But, it would go dormant in the summer during corn's growing season. The team discovered that the older grass varieties originally selected for the project failed to establish. In addition, the modern grass varieties stayed green too long. Not finding a perfect match on the first try didn't deter the researchers though. "We identified key challenges in varietal selection to ensure that further research efforts are focused effectively," Bartel explained. In addition to compatibility, Bartel studied the grasses' impacts on the maize. She found that the maize crops did produce less grain in the first year. However, in the second year, the normal control maize and the maize with grass had similar yields. Plus, the grass didn't negatively impact the quality of the stover in the second year or the quantity of the stover in either year. "Ultimately, there may be some yield penalty for perennial grass establishment in exchange for the natural resources benefits," Bartel concluded. "But refining the system further, to ensure compatibility between the row crop and grass cover species, should largely minimize that penalty." Bartel's field study began exploring one possible way to lessen the harm and increase the benefits of removing maize stover. Now future research can build on her work. Read more about Bartel's work in Agronomy Journal.


Mark A. Chinn, Founder and Principal of the law firm Chinn & Associates, PLLC, has joined The Expert Network©, an invitation-only service for distinguished professionals. Mr. Chinn has been chosen as a Distinguished Lawyer™ based on peer reviews and ratings, dozens of recognitions, and accomplishments achieved throughout his career. Mr. Chinn outshines others in his field due to his extensive educational background, numerous awards and recognitions, and career longevity. After earning his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science in 1975 from Iowa State University, he earned his Juris Doctor in 1978 from the University of Mississippi Law Center. He is also certified in Civil Trial Advocacy by the National Board of Trial Advocacy. Among numerous honors, Mr. Chinn has been recognized by many organizations and publications, such as Martindale-Hubbell®, Super Lawyers Magazine, and the Mississippi Business Journal as a top attorney and is sought after nationally to speak and write articles on law practice. With nearly 40 years dedicated to law, Mr. Chinn brings a wealth of knowledge to his industry and, in particular, to his area of specialization, family law. When asked about his journey pursuing a career as an attorney, Mr. Chinn said: "I have always wanted to be a lawyer for as long as I can remember and it probably got cemented in my mind when I watched different TV shows featuring lawyers. I have a vivid memory of watching the TV show, Petrocelli, and I was inspired by the way he was always pursuing just causes for people. I was very taken by the nobility of taking on someone's cause and protecting them." As a thought-leader in his field, Mr. Chinn is widely regarded for his numerous books, periodical publications, and speaking engagements. He has authored three books on the topic of family law: How to Build and Manage a Family Law Practice, The Constructive Divorce, and Forms, Checklists and Procedures for the Family Lawyer. Mr. Chinn is also a frequent contributor to periodicals such as the American Journal of Family Law, The Family Advocate, Small Firm Profit Report, and Fair Share on the subjects of client relations, service, and law practice management. Additionally, he is frequently asked to speak to the American Bar Association Family Law Section, The American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, The Iowa and Indiana Bar Associations, and the Mississippi Bar on issues of family law practice management and delivering world-class service. This prominence in his field gives Mr. Chinn a unique vantage point from which to keep his eye on prevailing trends within family law. In particular, he notes how efficient his work has gotten through the advent of case management software: "There are different ways to practice law; you can practice with a fountain pen and a legal pad; but I really enjoy the technology that is available to us that I think most attorneys fail to use. My goal is to continue to explore my ability to utilize all the tools available. In particular, I am focusing my attention towards document assembly software. I’m trying to move to a place where just about everything that I generate, I can generate through the use of document assembly with the mere press of a button. I already do a lot of that, but I’m not really touching the true depth of what I can do with this software. In the last year alone I’ve moved to using voice recognition software and that has allowed me to triple the amount of documents that I can produce." The Expert Network© has written this news release with approval and/or contributions from Mark A. Chinn. The Expert Network© is an invitation-only reputation management service that is dedicated to helping professionals stand out, network, and gain a competitive edge. The Expert Network© selects a limited number of professionals based on their individual recognitions and history of personal excellence.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

Thanks to key observations made with the assistance of NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) aircraft, astronomers confirm that a recently discovered star, called epsilon Eridani, mirrors our own solar system in a number of ways—only much earlier in its history. The SOFIA aircraft, a 747 loaded with a 2.5-meter telescope in the back, was just beginning the second half of an overnight mission on January 28, 2015. It turned north for a flight all the way to western Oregon, then back home to NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Palmdale, California. Along the way, pilots steered the plane to aim the telescope at a nearby star. Massimo Marengo and other astronomers were on board to observe the mission and collect infrared data about the star. Called epsilon Eridani, it’s about 10 light years away from the sun. It’s similar to our sun, but one-fifth the age. And astronomers believe it can tell them a lot about the development of our solar system. Marengo, associate professor of physics and astronomy at Iowa State University, and other astronomers have been studying the star and its planetary system since 2004. In a 2009 scientific paper, the astronomers used data from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope to describe the star’s disk of fine dust and debris left over from the formation of planets and the collisions of asteroids and comets. They reported the disk contained separate belts of asteroids, similar to the asteroid and Kuiper belts of our solar system. Subsequent studies by other astronomers questioned that finding. The new paper, available online in The Astronomical Journal, uses SOFIA and Spitzer data to confirm there are separate inner and outer disk structures. The astronomers report further studies will have to determine if the inner disk includes one or two debris belts. Marengo says the findings are important because they confirm epsilon Eridani is a good model of the early days of our solar system and can provide hints at how our solar system evolved. “This star hosts a planetary system currently undergoing the same cataclysmic processes that happened to the solar system in its youth, at the time in which the moon gained most of its craters, Earth acquired the water in its oceans, and the conditions favorable for life on our planet were set,” Marengo writes in a summary of the project. A major contributor to the new findings was data taken during that January 2015 flight of SOFIA. Marengo joined Su on the cold and noisy flight at 45,000 feet, above nearly all of the atmospheric water vapor that absorbs the infrared light that astronomers need to see planets and planetary debris. Determining the structure of the disk was a complex effort that took several years and detailed computer modeling. The astronomers had to separate the faint emission of the disk from the much brighter light coming from the star. “But we can now say with great confidence that there is a separation between the star’s inner and outer belts,” Marengo says. “There is a gap most likely created by planets. We haven’t detected them yet, but I would be surprised if they are not there. Seeing them will require using the next-generation instrumentation, perhaps NASA’s 6.5-meter James Webb Space Telescope scheduled for launch in October 2018.” That’s a lot of time and attention on one nearby star and its debris disk. But Marengo says it really is taking astronomers back in time. “The prize at the end of this road is to understand the true structure of epsilon Eridani’s out-of-this-world disk, and its interactions with the cohort of planets likely inhabiting its system,” Marengo writes in a newsletter story about the project. “SOFIA, by its unique ability of capturing infrared light in the dry stratospheric sky, is the closest we have to a time machine, revealing a glimpse of Earth’s ancient past by observing the present of a nearby young sun.” Kate Su, an associate astronomer at the University of Arizona and the university’s Steward Observatory, is the paper’s lead author.


News Article | April 29, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has determined which online colleges and universities in the U.S. have the most military-friendly programs and services. Of the 50 four-year schools that earned honors, Drexel University, University of Southern California, Duquesne University, Regis University and Harvard University were the top five. 50 two-year schools were also recognized; Laramie County Community College, Western Wyoming Community College, Dakota College at Bottineau, Mesa Community College and Kansas City Kansas Community College ranked as the top five. A complete list of top schools is included below. “Veterans and active duty members of the military often face unique challenges when it comes to transitioning into college, from navigating the GI Bill to getting used to civilian life,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “These online schools not only offer military-friendly resources, they also offer an online format, allowing even the busiest members of our armed forces to earn a degree or certificate.” To be included on the “Most Military-Friendly Online Colleges” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also evaluated on additional data points such as the number and variety of degree programs offered, military tuition rates, employment services, post-college earnings of alumni and military-related academic resources. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Most Military-Friendly Online Colleges” list, visit: The Most Military-Friendly Online Four-Year Colleges in the U.S. for 2017 include: Arizona State University-Tempe Auburn University Azusa Pacific University Baker University Boston University Canisius College Carnegie Mellon University Columbia University in the City of New York Creighton University Dallas Baptist University Drexel University Duquesne University George Mason University Hampton University Harvard University Illinois Institute of Technology Iowa State University La Salle University Lawrence Technological University Lewis University Loyola University Chicago Miami University-Oxford Michigan Technological University Missouri University of Science and Technology North Carolina State University at Raleigh Norwich University Oklahoma State University-Main Campus Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus Purdue University-Main Campus Regis University Rochester Institute of Technology Saint Leo University Southern Methodist University Syracuse University Texas A & M University-College Station University of Arizona University of Denver University of Florida University of Idaho University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign University of Michigan-Ann Arbor University of Minnesota-Twin Cities University of Mississippi University of Missouri-Columbia University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Oklahoma-Norman Campus University of Southern California University of the Incarnate Word Washington State University Webster University The Most Military-Friendly Online Two-Year Colleges in the U.S. for 2017 include: Aims Community College Allen County Community College Amarillo College Barton County Community College Bunker Hill Community College Casper College Central Texas College Chandler-Gilbert Community College Cincinnati State Technical and Community College Cochise College Columbus State Community College Cowley County Community College Craven Community College Dakota College at Bottineau East Mississippi Community College Eastern New Mexico University - Roswell Campus Edmonds Community College Fox Valley Technical College GateWay Community College Grayson College Hutchinson Community College Kansas City Kansas Community College Lake Region State College Laramie County Community College Lone Star College Mesa Community College Metropolitan Community College Mitchell Technical Institute Mount Wachusett Community College Navarro College Northeast Community College Norwalk Community College Ozarka College Phoenix College Prince George's Community College Quinsigamond Community College Rio Salado College Rose State College Sheridan College Shoreline Community College Sinclair College Southeast Community College Southwestern Oregon Community College State Fair Community College Truckee Meadows Community College Western Nebraska Community College Western Oklahoma State College Western Texas College Western Wyoming Community College Yavapai College ### About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Leading higher education information and resource provider AffordableCollegesOnline.org has announced its list of the best online colleges for veterans and military personnel for 2017. The ranking names the top 59 two- and four-year schools and the top 50 four-year schools in the nation based on service member-friendly benefits, affordability and program quality. The four-year schools with the best scores were University of Southern Mississippi, Webster University, Saint Leo University, University of Idaho and Murray State University. The top five two-year schools include Central Texas College, St. Philip’s College, Mount Wachusett Community College, Wake Technical Community College and Del Mar College. "Veterans and current members of the military face some unique challenges when it comes to earning a certificate or degree,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. “These schools have demonstrated a commitment to providing outstanding benefits and resources to service members who choose to pursue an online education, while also maintaining affordability and quality standards.” To qualify for a spot on AffordableCollegesOnline.org’s rankings, schools must meet several minimum requirements. Each college cited is institutionally accredited and holds public or private not-for-profit standing. Each is also scored based on a comparison of more than a dozen metrics including the availability and amount of financial aid, military tuition discounts, ROTC programs, veteran support services and graduation rates by school. AffordableCollegesOnline.org enforces strict affordability standards, requiring schools to offer in-state tuition rates below $20,000 per year for four-year schools, and below $5,000 per year for two-year schools. All eligible school scores are compared to determine the final “Best” list. For complete details on the data and methodology used to score each school and a full list of ranking colleges, visit: Top Four-Year Schools in the U.S. with Military-Friendly Online Programs for 2017: Arkansas State University-Main Campus Azusa Pacific University Ball State University Columbia College Dallas Baptist University Duquesne University East Carolina University Eastern Kentucky University Hampton University Hawaii Pacific University Iowa State University Kansas State University Lawrence Technological University Lewis University Mercy College Mississippi State University Missouri State University-Springfield Montana State University-Billings Murray State University New England College Niagara University Northern Arizona University Northern Kentucky University Norwich University Oklahoma State University-Main Campus Oral Roberts University Point Park University Regis University Saint Leo University Texas A & M University-College Station The College of Saint Scholastica The University of Alabama The University of Montana Tiffin University Troy University University of Arizona University of Cincinnati-Main Campus University of Idaho University of Mississippi University of Nebraska at Omaha University of North Carolina at Greensboro University of Oklahoma-Norman Campus University of South Florida-Main Campus University of Southern Mississippi University of the Incarnate Word University of Toledo Viterbo University Washington State University Webster University Western Kentucky University Top Two-Year Schools in the U.S. with Military-Friendly Online Programs for 2017: ### AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

By 2050, we will need to feed 2 billion more people on less land. Meanwhile, carbon dioxide levels are predicted to hit 600 parts per million--a 50% increase over today's levels--and 2050 temperatures are expected to frequently match the top 5% hottest days from 1950-1979. In a three-year field study, researchers proved engineered soybeans yield more than conventional soybeans in 2050's predicted climatic conditions. "Our climate system and atmosphere are not changing in isolation from other factors--there are actually multiple facets," said USDA/ARS scientist Carl Bernacchi, an associate professor of plant biology at the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology at the University of Illinois. "The effect of carbon dioxide in and of itself seems to be very generalized, but neglects the complexity of adding temperature into the mix. This research is one step in the right direction towards trying to figure out a way of mitigating those temperature-related yield losses that will likely occur even with rising carbon dioxide concentrations." Published in the Journal of Experimental Botany, this study found the modified crop yielded more when subjected to both increased temperature and carbon dioxide levels; however, they found little to no difference between the modified and unmodified crops grown in either increased temperature, increased carbon dioxide, or today's climate conditions. This work suggests that we can harness genetic changes to help offset the detrimental effects of rising temperature. In addition, Bernacchi said, it illustrates that we cannot deduce complicated environmental and plant systems to increasing carbon dioxide levels increase yields and increasing temperature reduce yields. "Experiments under controlled conditions are great to understand concepts and underlying mechanisms," said first author of the study Iris Köhler, a former postdoctoral researcher in the Bernacchi lab. "But to understand what will happen in a real-world situation, it is crucial to study the responses in a natural setting--and SoyFACE is perfect for this kind of study." SoyFACE (Soybean Free Air Concentration Enrichment) is an innovative facility that emulates future atmospheric conditions to understand the impact on Midwestern crops. These findings are especially remarkable because the crops in this SoyFACE experiment were exposed to the same environmental conditions (i.e. the sun, wind, rain, clouds, etc.) as other Illinois field crops. "It's actually a bit of a surprise," Bernacchi said. "I've been doing field research for quite some time, and variability is one of the things that's an inherent part of field research. Of course, we did see variability in yields from year to year, but the difference between the modified and unmodified plants was remarkably consistent over these three years." These modified soybeans are just one part of the equation to meet the demands of 2050. This modification can likely be combined with other modifications--a process called "stacking"--to further improve yields. "When we're trying to meet our food needs for the future, this specific modification is one of the many tools that we're going to need to rely upon," Bernacchi said. "There is a lot of research across the planet that's looking at different strategies to make improvements, and many of these are not mutually exclusive." The paper "Expression of cyanobacterial FBP/SBPase in soybean prevents yield depression under future climate conditions" is published by the Journal of Experimental Botany (10.1093/jxb/erw435). Co-authors also include: Ursula M. Ruiz-Vera, postdoctoral researcher at the University of Illinois; Andy VanLoocke, assistant professor at Iowa State University; Michell Thomey, USDA-ARS Research Plant Physiologist and postdoctoral researcher at Illinois; Tom Clemente, Eugene W. Price Distinguished Professor of Biotechnology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Stephen Long, Gutgsell Endowed Professor of Plant Biology and Crop Sciences at Illinois; and Donald Ort, Robert Emerson Professor of Plant Biology at Illinois.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

BLOOMINGTON, Minn.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Minnesota Masonic Charities (MMC) today announced the recipients of its 2017 Scholarships Program. As part of its continuing commitment to building a better future for Minnesota, the nonprofit organization provides annual awards to some of the state’s most promising scholars. Since 2008, the organization has provided more than $2 million to fund Minnesota students seeking higher education. By 2018, Minnesota Masonic Charities plans to distribute $1 million annually in merit scholarship awards. “Our scholars reflect the values and character that are important to Masons,” said Eric Neetenbeek, Minnesota Masonic Charities president and CEO. “They demonstrate integrity and dedication – two traits we believe exemplify leadership. We have great faith in the individuals we select for these awards each year.” MMC offers up to 95 scholarship awards annually. The Signature, Legacy, Heritage and Vocational scholarships are made available to high school seniors on an equal opportunity basis, with no discrimination for age, gender, religion, national origin or Masonic affiliation; and an Undergraduate scholarship for up to 20 current college students is also available. All awards range from $1,000 to $5,000 per year, and students may renew their scholarship awards annually, provided they maintain scholastic performance. Please see the following page for a complete list of the 2017 Masonic Scholars. For more information about the Minnesota Masonic Charities Scholarships Program, please contact Kelly Johns, Director of Communications for MMC, at 952-948-6202 or kelly.johns@mnmasonic.org. Colton Mowers, Albert Lea (University of Wisconsin, Madison) Lucas Fleissner, Rochester (Iowa State University) Seth Cattanach, Lake Elmo (University of Notre Dame) Katelynne Schatz, Kettle River (College of St. Scholastica) Rachel Pompa, Hermantown (University of Minnesota, Duluth) Karli Weisz, Mora (University of North Dakota) Brock Drevlow, Theif River Falls (Johns Hopkins University) Jack Hedberg, Roseville (University of Minnesota, Twin Cities) Sophia Vrba, Maple Grove (University of Minnesota, Twin Cities) Za Vang, Minneapolis (University of St. Thomas) Sela Fadness, Austin (Hamline University) Tess Hatfield, Hill City (University of Wisconsin, Superior) Isabel Brown, White Bear lake (University of Minnesota, Twin Cities) Taylor Schmidt, Duluth (College of St. Scholastica) Jenifer Weyer, St. Cloud (Winona State University) Anthony Tran Vu, St. Paul (University of St. Thomas) Ryan McMahon, Mahtomedi (University of Minnesota, Twin Cities) Alex Sellner, Fairfax (Gustavus Adolphus College) Nathan Kuhn, Eagan (Southwest Minnesota State University) Caroline Sullivan, Fridley (University of Minnesota, Twin Cities)


News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

With the generous support from The D. H. Chen Foundation, the Faculty of Applied Science and Textiles (FAST) of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) invited Prof. Dan Shechtman, 2011 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, to speak at the PolyU 80th Anniversary ‧ The D. H. Chen Foundation Nobel Laureate Lecture Series in Hong Kong today (20 April 2017). The title of his lecture is "Why Should We Teach Technological Entrepreneurship in Universities?" Prof. Shechtman believes that the dropping birth rates in developed countries nowadays inevitably pose threats to the countries for maintaining stable and economically advanced societies. Apart from opening borders to waves of immigration or encouraging families to have more children, he believes skilled entrepreneurs can fill the gap by starting hi-tech businesses with high return on investiment and human capital, and hence is the key to building up thriving economies. He believes motivating university students of engineering, medicine and science as a start would help set up a group of role models of successful entreprenuers who will then kick start a process leading to a huge difference in the life of a country. Prof. Shechtman's Nobel Prize-awarded discovery of the Icosahedral Phase by TEM (Transmission Electro Microscope) opened the new science of quasiperiodic crystals. He is now Philip Tobias Professor of Materials Science at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology and Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Iowa State University. PolyU has invited renowned Nobel Laureates in various disciplines, including Physiology or Medicine, Chemistry, as well as Economic Sciences, to deliver insightful and informative lectures at TheNobel Laureate Lecture Series on a wide range of topics of interests to the local community. The Nobel Laureate Lecture Series is one of the celebratory events for PolyU's 80th anniversary. For further information, please visit https://www.polyu.edu.hk/fast/80anniversary/nobel_apr/.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

NASA's SOFIA aircraft, a 747 loaded with a 2.5-meter telescope in the back and stripped of most creature comforts in the front, took a big U-turn over the Pacific west of Mexico. The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy aircraft was just beginning the second half of an overnight mission on Jan. 28, 2015. It turned north for a flight all the way to western Oregon, then back home to NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center in Palmdale, California. Along the way, pilots steered the plane to aim the telescope at a nearby star. Iowa State University's Massimo Marengo and other astronomers were on board to observe the mission and collect infrared data about the star. That star is called epsilon Eridani. It's about 10 light years away from the sun. It's similar to our sun, but one-fifth the age. And astronomers believe it can tell them a lot about the development of our solar system. Marengo, an Iowa State associate professor of physics and astronomy, and other astronomers have been studying the star and its planetary system since 2004. In a 2009 scientific paper, the astronomers used data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope to describe the star's disk of fine dust and debris left over from the formation of planets and the collisions of asteroids and comets. They reported the disk contained separate belts of asteroids, similar to the asteroid and Kuiper belts of our solar system. Subsequent studies by other astronomers questioned that finding. A new scientific paper, just published online by The Astronomical Journal, uses SOFIA and Spitzer data to confirm there are separate inner and outer disk structures. The astronomers report further studies will have to determine if the inner disk includes one or two debris belts. Kate Su, an associate astronomer at the University of Arizona and the university's Steward Observatory, is the paper's lead author. Marengo is one of the paper's nine co-authors. Marengo said the findings are important because they confirm epsilon Eridani is a good model of the early days of our solar system and can provide hints at how our solar system evolved. "This star hosts a planetary system currently undergoing the same cataclysmic processes that happened to the solar system in its youth, at the time in which the moon gained most of its craters, Earth acquired the water in its oceans, and the conditions favorable for life on our planet were set," Marengo wrote in a summary of the project. A major contributor to the new findings was data taken during that January 2015 flight of SOFIA. Marengo joined Su on the cold and noisy flight at 45,000 feet, above nearly all of the atmospheric water vapor that absorbs the infrared light that astronomers need to see planets and planetary debris. Determining the structure of the disk was a complex effort that took several years and detailed computer modeling. The astronomers had to separate the faint emission of the disk from the much brighter light coming from the star. "But we can now say with great confidence that there is a separation between the star's inner and outer belts," Marengo said. "There is a gap most likely created by planets. We haven't detected them yet, but I would be surprised if they are not there. Seeing them will require using the next-generation instrumentation, perhaps NASA's 6.5-meter James Webb Space Telescope scheduled for launch in October 2018." That's a lot of time and attention on one nearby star and its debris disk. But Marengo said it really is taking astronomers back in time. "The prize at the end of this road is to understand the true structure of epsilon Eridani's out-of-this-world disk, and its interactions with the cohort of planets likely inhabiting its system," Marengo wrote in a newsletter story about the project. "SOFIA, by its unique ability of capturing infrared light in the dry stratospheric sky, is the closest we have to a time machine, revealing a glimpse of Earth's ancient past by observing the present of a nearby young sun."


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

Only known vehicle to have been signed twice by a U.S. president will be the highlight of a Barrett Jackson auction in West Palm Beach. ​​​​​​The prestigious auction company Barrett Jackson announced this week that a white 2009 King Ranch F-150 4X4 pickup autographed twice by President George W. Bush would be auctioned on Saturday April 8 at approximately 3:30pm at the South Florida Fairgrounds. The event will be broadcast nationwide on the Velocity channel. Since the announcement was made public, the auction has generated tremendous interest on social media.  The truck was purchased by Allan Jones, the founder and CEO of Check Into Cash in 2013 at that year’s Palm Beach Barrett Jackson auction. Prior to the auction, Bush kept the truck at his Prairie Chapel Ranch in Crawford, TX after he left the White House in 2009. It still has the original license plates. “We originally bought the President’s truck to benefit the National Guard Youth Foundation and always intended to resell it for charity,” said Jones. “I never imagined the F-150 would become such a collectible because the President autographed it not just once – but twice!” Jones explained that after he purchased the truck in 2013, the Bush signature was accidentally washed off during routine maintenance. When he realized what had happened, Jones asked the President if he would sign it again so that truck could be resold for charity. “President Bush graciously agreed to help us and the rest is history,” Jones said. “He autographed the F-150 in the exact same location on the right airbag panel. Once word got out, everyone wanted to know when the auction was taking place.” Jones, a regular on Fox News, also gained national attention for rescuing Hardwick Clothes – America’s oldest tailor-made clothing manufacturer – from bankruptcy in 2014. He is well-known for donating to youth sports. The businessman donated wrestling buildings to two high schools in his hometown of Cleveland, TN, and donated the Allan Jones Aquatic Center to the University of Tennessee at Knoxville in 2008. Jones also received national attention in 2011 when he partnered with Randy Boyd (formerly Tennessee’s Economic & Community Development Commissioner and a leading candidate for governor) on the Tennessee Achieves program to ensure every graduating high school senior in Bradley County, TN, could attend college free of charge. The landmark program was such a success that it was later renamed “Tennessee Promise” and adopted statewide by Gov. Bill Haslam. Most recently, Jones was given the 2017 Distinguished Service Award by the Tennessee Interscholastic Athletic Administrator’s Association for his philanthropy to local schools. Jones has designated that all the proceeds from the April 8 sale of the truck will go to the Community Foundation of Cleveland and Bradley County, TN [a community based 501 (C) (3) qualified charity] for the further designated purpose of supporting one of the nation’s top youth wrestling clubs (the Higher Calling Wrestling Club, Inc. in Tennessee) and the Dan Gable Museum in Waterloo, IA that benefits youth wrestling - named after the most dominant wrestler in history. “Dan Gable is a wrestling legend whose name is famous all over the world,” said Jones. “He had a high school and college record of 181-1 and as an Olympic competitor in the Munich Games of 1972, he brought home the Gold Medal and was undefeated and un-scored upon.  As a college wrestler at Iowa State University, he was a two-time NCAA champion/three-time finalist and as a coach brought Iowa 15 NCAA titles – nine in a row from 1978 to 1986 - and 21 straight Big Ten team titles, not to mention Coach of the Year three times.  It is our pleasure to honor this legend and help continue the fine work that he does.” Gable noted even before the 2017 auction, the Bush truck had raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for veterans and Wounded Warrior programs. “Now, thanks to Janie and Allan Jones and the new purchaser, this special truck will help countless young boys and girls participating in many wrestling programs,” said Gable. “It will also benefit the Dan Gable Museum’s expansion of its Teaching Center, Wrestling Room, Theater and Museum.” Gable added: “The monies from this auction will benefit thousands of youth wrestlers in the next few years as well as the museum. This is history.” See Barrett-Jackson.com or click http://bit.ly/2mPJZAT for more on the West Palm Beach auction.


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.materialstoday.com

Iowa State University researchers (left to right: Metin Uz, Suprem Das, Surya Mallapragada and Jonathan Claussen) are developing technologies to promote nerve regrowth. The monitor shows mesenchymal stem cells (white) aligned along graphene circuits (black). Photo: Christopher Gannon/Iowa State University.Researchers looking for ways to regenerate nerves can have a hard time obtaining the key tools of their trade. Take Schwann cells, which form sheaths around axons – the tail-like parts of nerve cells that carry electrical impulses – and also promote regeneration of those axons and secrete substances that promote the health of nerve cells. In other words, they're very useful to researchers hoping to regenerate nerve cells, especially peripheral nerve cells outside the brain and spinal cord. But Schwann cells are hard to come by in useful numbers. So researchers have been taking readily-available and non-controversial mesenchymal stem cells (also known as bone marrow stromal stem cells, because they can form bone, cartilage and fat cells) and using a chemical process to turn them, or differentiate them, into Schwann cells. But it's an arduous, step-by-step and expensive process. Researchers at Iowa State University are now exploring what they hope will be a better way to transform mesenchymal stem cells into Schwann-like cells. They've developed a nanotechnology-based process that involves using inkjet printers to print multi-layer graphene circuits, and then lasers to treat and improve the surface structure and conductivity of those circuits. It turns out that mesenchymal stem cells adhere and grow well on the treated circuit's raised, rough and three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures. Add small doses of electricity – 100 millivolts for 10 minutes per day over 15 days – and the stem cells differentiate into Schwann-like cells. The researchers' findings are reported in a paper in Advanced Healthcare Materials, and are also featured on the front cover. Jonathan Claussen, an Iowa State assistant professor of mechanical engineering and an associate at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, is lead author. Suprem Das, a postdoctoral research associate in mechanical engineering and an associate of the Ames Laboratory, and Metin Uz, a postdoctoral research associate in chemical and biological engineering, are first authors. "This technology could lead to a better way to differentiate stem cells," said Uz. "There is huge potential here." The electrical stimulation is very effective, differentiating 85% of the stem cells into Schwann-like cells, compared to 75% for the standard chemical process. The electrically-differentiated cells also produced 80 nanograms per milliliter of nerve growth factor compared to 55 nanograms per milliliter for the chemically-treated cells. The researchers report that the results could lead to changes in how nerve injuries are treated inside the body. "These results help pave the way for in vivo peripheral nerve regeneration where the flexible graphene electrodes could conform to the injury site and provide intimate electrical stimulation for nerve cell regrowth," the researchers wrote in a summary of their findings. The paper reports several advantages to using electrical stimulation to differentiate stem cells into Schwann-like cells. These include: doing away with the arduous steps of chemical processing; reducing costs by eliminating the need for expensive nerve growth factors; potentially increasing control of stem cell differentiation with precise electrical stimulation; and creating a low maintenance, artificial framework for neural damage repairs. A key to making it all work is the graphene inkjet printing process developed in Claussen's research lab. This process takes advantage of graphene's wonder-material properties – it's a great conductor of electricity and heat, and is strong, stable and biocompatible – to produce low-cost, flexible and even wearable electronics. But there is a problem: once the graphene electronic circuits are printed, they have to be treated to improve their electrical conductivity. That usually means exposing them to high temperatures or chemicals, and either could damage flexible printing surfaces including plastic films or paper. Claussen and his research group solved the problem by replacing the high temperatures and chemicals with computer-controlled laser technology. This laser treatment removes ink binders and reduces graphene oxide to graphene – physically stitching together millions of tiny graphene flakes – improving the electrical conductivity more than a thousand times. This collaboration between Claussen's group of nanoengineers developing printed graphene technologies and Mallapragada's group of chemical engineers working on nerve regeneration began with some informal conversations on campus. That led to experimental attempts to grow stem cells on printed graphene and then to electrical stimulation experiments. "We knew this would be a really good platform for electrical stimulation," Das said. "But we didn't know it would differentiate these cells." But now that it has, the researchers say there are new possibilities to think about. The technology, for example, could one day be used to create dissolvable or absorbable nerve regeneration materials that could be surgically placed in a person's body and wouldn't require a second surgery to remove. This story is adapted from material from Iowa State University, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier. Link to original source.


“The risk of asteroid impacts on Earth is much higher than assumed by many in the scientific community,” warns chemist Hugh Miller, director of the International Paleo-chronology Group (IPG).  “Surprise asteroid encounters such as the explosion over Chelyabinsk, Russia on February 15, 2013, are a tremendous wake-up call.  But discoveries by Dr. Dallas Abbott and associates at Columbia University of an ocean-floor impact 2,400 years ago near New Jersey that sent a flood up the Hudson River, and 4,800 years ago near Madagascar reveal an estimated 500 times increased risk factor.”  There are 185 known impact craters on land, and many more certainly struck the oceans, which cover 70% of Earth’s surface.  Abbott’s group identified evidence of over 220 coastal tsunamis that could be caused by ocean impacts. NASA Administrator Charles Bolden was asked during the House Science, Space and Technology Committee hearing on March 19, 2013 what could be done if an asteroid is detected heading towards Earth with only three weeks warning.  "If it's coming in three weeks ... pray," Bolden said.  "The reason I can't do anything in the next three weeks is because for decades we have put it off."  In a NASA panel discussion on the Asteroid Redirect Mission on September 14, 2016, the Science Advisor to President Obama, John P. Holdren, doctor of aerospace engineering and physics, advised, “We have to be smarter than the dinosaurs.” “The risk factor could actually be up to 2000 times greater than what NASA expects,” Miller says,“ due to evidence of a more recent demise of most dinosaurs than the 65 million years assumed for the Chicxulub meteorite impact.  How can there be such an age gap between dinosaurs and man when there are hundreds of accurate dinosaur depictions worldwide made by our ancestors?  How could soft tissue and collagen protein last 65 to 197 million years in some dinosaur bones, and Carbon-14 in all bones studied (including Triceratops, Hadrosaurus, Acrocanthosaurus, Allosaurus and Stegosaurus, yielding ages of only thousands of years) – discoveries that have been confirmed by several teams of scientists including the IPG. This re-writes the age of impact craters.” “Flume experiments and field studies by many modern geologists demonstrate how the thick and vast sedimentary deposits such as one finds in the Grand Canyon were deposited by rapidly flowing waters before hardening into sandstone and limestone,” according to Guy Berthault, French sedimentologist and advisor to IPG. Miller maintained, “If most dinosaurs became extinct due to one or more asteroid or comet impacts on Earth then we too are targets in a shooting gallery, and it behooves the U.S. and other governments to provide the funds necessary to expedite a viable defense against mass killers from space.” “A few initiatives have begun by space scientists who see the threat are grossly underfunded,” he notes, “such as the gravity tractor planned by NASA and the Hypervelocity Asteroid Intercept Vehicle conceived by the Emergency Asteroid Defense Program at Iowa State University.  Over a million small and medium size asteroids now orbiting near the Earth are a far greater risk to humanity than climate change, over which we have little more control than did our ancestors during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and Little Ice Age that followed later.” Current estimates have asteroid 2012-TC-4 missing Earth by 3% of the distance to the Moon on October 12, 2017.  It may be half to twice the size of the Chelyabinsk meteor.  Should the orbital estimates be off, it could explode above ground with the force of six Hiroshima atomic bombs. Summing up, Miller said, “If an asteroid one kilometer in diameter crashed into a landmass or ocean we could witness not only huge loss of life but a drastically altered climate, even nuclear winter.  This is a global threat.  Nations should pool their resources for protection against Near-Earth Objects.” “The research shows it’s just a matter of time till the next encounter, and far less than most people think.  As Congress begins writing the next national budget soon, this must be included as national defense.  Pay now or pray later.” CONTACT INFORMATION: The International Paleo-chronology Group, (IPG) Hugh Miller,hugoc14@aol.com and www.dinosaurc14ages.com; Dr. Robert Bennett,robert.bennett@rcn.com; Hugh Owen, howen@shentel.net and www.kolbecenter.org;  Guy Berthault, berthault.guy@orange.fr and www.sedimentology.fr/ Read more at http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/organizations/nasa/nasa-provides-update-asteroid-redirect-mission/#6lME4azz5eCyahhW.99. and


"We are proud and honored to have Larry receive this prestigious award. From his many years of dedication serving HR Green and Iowa communities, Larry's contributions are helping shape the future of the Public Works profession," said Rick White, President, Governmental Services at HR Green. Stevens holds a bachelor's degree in Civil Engineering from South Dakota State University and has enjoyed a long and distinguished career in Municipal Engineering. With over 40 years of professional experience, he has served in numerous leadership roles, including being President of APWA in 2014-15.  His professional experience includes serving as the Director of the Iowa Statewide Urban Design and Specifications (SUDAS) Program at Iowa State University from 2003-2009, 22 years as City Engineer and Public Works Director for Oskaloosa, Iowa, and Assistant City Engineer for the City of Grinnell, Iowa for five years. Stevens joined HR Green's Des Moines, Iowa office in 2009, where he continues to provide municipal engineering services to some of the firm's key clients. In addition to his successful career as a public works leader, Stevens also serves as a teacher and mentor to young public works professionals through Iowa Chapter of APWA. Each national Top Ten Public Works Leader will be honored at a local ceremony in conjunction with National Public Works Week and also during the Awards Ceremony of the APWA 2017 Public Works Exposition taking place in Orlando, FL in August. Originally founded in 1913, HR Green has offices in Des Moines, Iowa and throughout the United States. HR Green provides engineering, technical, and management services to clients in the following markets: Transportation, Water, Governmental Services, Land Development, Environmental, and Construction. For more information, visit www.hrgreen.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/hr-greens-larry-stevens-named-as-one-of-apwas-2017-top-ten-public-works-leaders-of-the-year-300449895.html


The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy aircraft was just beginning the second half of an overnight mission on Jan. 28, 2015. It turned north for a flight all the way to western Oregon, then back home to NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center in Palmdale, California. Along the way, pilots steered the plane to aim the telescope at a nearby star. Iowa State University's Massimo Marengo and other astronomers were on board to observe the mission and collect infrared data about the star. That star is called epsilon Eridani. It's about 10 light years away from the sun. It's similar to our sun, but one-fifth the age. And astronomers believe it can tell them a lot about the development of our solar system. Marengo, an Iowa State associate professor of physics and astronomy, and other astronomers have been studying the star and its planetary system since 2004. In a 2009 scientific paper, the astronomers used data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope to describe the star's disk of fine dust and debris left over from the formation of planets and the collisions of asteroids and comets. They reported the disk contained separate belts of asteroids, similar to the asteroid and Kuiper belts of our solar system. Subsequent studies by other astronomers questioned that finding. A new scientific paper, just published online by The Astronomical Journal, uses SOFIA and Spitzer data to confirm there are separate inner and outer disk structures. The astronomers report further studies will have to determine if the inner disk includes one or two debris belts. Kate Su, an associate astronomer at the University of Arizona and the university's Steward Observatory, is the paper's lead author. Marengo is one of the paper's nine co-authors. Marengo said the findings are important because they confirm epsilon Eridani is a good model of the early days of our solar system and can provide hints at how our solar system evolved. "This star hosts a planetary system currently undergoing the same cataclysmic processes that happened to the solar system in its youth, at the time in which the moon gained most of its craters, Earth acquired the water in its oceans, and the conditions favorable for life on our planet were set," Marengo wrote in a summary of the project. A major contributor to the new findings was data taken during that January 2015 flight of SOFIA. Marengo joined Su on the cold and noisy flight at 45,000 feet, above nearly all of the atmospheric water vapor that absorbs the infrared light that astronomers need to see planets and planetary debris. Determining the structure of the disk was a complex effort that took several years and detailed computer modeling. The astronomers had to separate the faint emission of the disk from the much brighter light coming from the star. "But we can now say with great confidence that there is a separation between the star's inner and outer belts," Marengo said. "There is a gap most likely created by planets. We haven't detected them yet, but I would be surprised if they are not there. Seeing them will require using the next-generation instrumentation, perhaps NASA's 6.5-meter James Webb Space Telescope scheduled for launch in October 2018." That's a lot of time and attention on one nearby star and its debris disk. But Marengo said it really is taking astronomers back in time. "The prize at the end of this road is to understand the true structure of epsilon Eridani's out-of-this-world disk, and its interactions with the cohort of planets likely inhabiting its system," Marengo wrote in a newsletter story about the project. "SOFIA, by its unique ability of capturing infrared light in the dry stratospheric sky, is the closest we have to a time machine, revealing a glimpse of Earth's ancient past by observing the present of a nearby young sun." Explore further: Solar System's Young Twin Has Two Asteroid Belts More information: Kate Y. L. Su et al, The Inner 25 au Debris Distribution in theEri System, The Astronomical Journal (2017). DOI: 10.3847/1538-3881/aa696b


Jin S.,ETRI | Qiao D.,Iowa State University
IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology | Year: 2012

We analyze the power-saving operation in Third-Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) Long-Term Evolution Advanced (LTE Advanced) wireless networks. Typically, it is an exhausting and complicated job to numerically analyze the performance of power-saving operations since it is necessary to carefully consider every possible probability, make probability-generating functions, and differentiate these functions. Instead, we develop a totally new approach toward simple but accurate derivations. For this purpose, we divide the time period for the steady-state power-saving operation into several independent parts. Then, we analyze the power-saving operation in each part and thereafter combine the results into an aggregate result. The new approach enables us to avoid sophisticated steps while we reach an accurate analytical model. The equations are validated through comparison with simulation results. © 2012 IEEE.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.96K | Year: 2012

ABSTRACT: In this STTR program, Agiltron and Iowa State University (ISU) jointly propose to develop simple material and structural solutions that enable directionally dependent emission in the infrared regime. The highly directional infrared emission has extremely narrow emission patterns and a large difference between high and low emission states. In the Phase I program, the structure will be fabricated on top of a flat silicon substrate. Samples will be provided to the US Air Force for evaluation. The sample will have the following properties that fully fulfill the requirement of this solicitation: ratio of high/low emissivity better than 20, angle of radiation cone as small as 5 degrees. BENEFIT: The technical approach we propose is highly generalizable to the development of infrared lens/filters, beam splitters and other focal plane elements with highly directional emission property. It can be used for thermal management in space and other commercial applications. It can also be used to alter the observability of platforms as a function of angle of observation.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 499.18K | Year: 2012

This STTR is aimed at developing methods and tools to characterize the impact of free-play on control surface flutter and overall stability and performance of the system. A successful completion of this two-phased STTR effort will lead to a modeling, analysis, design, and simulation tool that will provide a state-of-the-art capability for stability and performance analysis for any generic control surface configuration with free-play. It will also provide an optimal design capability for the design of control surfaces for new platforms. The modularity of the tool will allow model generation with varying degrees of fidelity using a combination of analytical, computational, and experimental identification methods. The nonlinear dynamic analysis capabilities in the tool will include newly developed nonlinear analysis techniques which will enable optimization of the design space for control surfaces as well as accurate predictions of stability and performance boundaries for existing platforms. The final product is envisioned to be a software that can: Model, simulate, and analyze the existing control surface geometries with free play and provide stability and performance assessment through useful metric. Optimally design new control surfaces for a specified stability and performance robustness with least restrictive free-play specifications.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.98K | Year: 2010

The aerodynamic performance of aircraft is significantly impacted by the aero-elastic dynamics of its control surfaces. In particular, the dynamics of flutter - an unstable self-excitation of structure due to undesirable coupling of structural flexibility and aerodynamics - has critical impact on the stability and performance of aircraft. The control surface flutter characteristics are affected by the unavoidable free-play which is inherent in the control surface due to manufacturing imperfections. There are no systematic methods to predict free-play effect on flutter. The proposed research will develop a comprehensive tool-suite which will: (a) provide state-of-the-art capability for stability and performance analysis of any generic control surface configuration, (b) allow modeling of control surface dynamics with varying degrees of fidelity using combination of analytical, computational, and experimental identification methods, (c) provide new analysis techniques to enable accurate prediction of stability/performance boundaries for existing platforms, and (d) provide optimal design capability for design of control surfaces for new platforms. The Phase 1 of the project will develope essential elements of the proposed tool-suite to prove the feasibility of the approach and demonstrate the capabilities by using 1950's WADC test data for all-movable un-swept horizontal tail.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

AUSTIN, Texas, Feb. 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Aeglea BioTherapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ:AGLE), a biotechnology company committed to developing enzyme-based therapeutics in the field of amino acid metabolism to treat rare genetic diseases and cancer, today announced the appointment of Suzanne L. Bruhn, Ph.D. to its Board of Directors. Dr. Bruhn previously served as chief executive officer, president and director at Promedior, Inc., a clinical-stage biotechnology company, from 2012 to 2015. “Suzanne’s depth of experience in the early-stage biotechnology space and expertise in orphan diseases will be a valuable addition to our Board,” said David G. Lowe, Ph.D., co-founder, president and chief executive officer of Aeglea. “Her insights and guidance will be a tremendous asset as we further our clinical programs in order to pursue our mission of developing treatments for patients with rare genetic diseases and cancer.” During her time at Promedior, Dr. Bruhn focused the company’s strategy on clinical development for orphan diseases and negotiated the grant of an exclusive option to acquire Promedior to Bristol-Myers Squibb Company in 2015. Prior to Promedior, Dr. Bruhn held a number of roles in strategic and portfolio planning, program management and regulatory affairs at Shire Human Genetic Therapies, formerly known as Transkaryotic Therapies, between 1998 and 2012. She also served on the board of directors of Raptor Pharmaceuticals Corp., a biotechnology company focused on treating rare metabolic disorders, from 2011 until it was sold to Horizon Pharma plc in October 2016. Dr. Bruhn earned her bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Iowa State University of Science and Technology and her Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. About Aeglea BioTherapeutics Aeglea is a biotechnology company committed to developing enzyme-based therapeutics in the field of amino acid metabolism to treat rare genetic diseases and cancer. The company’s engineered human enzymes are designed to modulate the extremes of amino acid metabolism in the blood to reduce toxic levels of amino acids in inborn errors of metabolism or target tumor metabolism for cancer treatment. AEB1102, Aeglea’s lead product candidate, is currently being studied in two ongoing Phase 1 clinical trials in patients with advanced solid tumors and acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (AML/MDS). Additionally, Aeglea is recruiting patients into its ongoing Phase 1/2 trial of AEB1102 for the treatment of patients with Arginase I deficiency. The company is building a pipeline of additional product candidates targeting key amino acids, including AEB4104, which degrades homocystine, a target for an inborn error of metabolism, as well as two potential treatments for cancer, AEB3103, which degrades cysteine/cystine, and AEB2109, which degrades methionine. For more information, please visit http://aegleabio.com. Safe Harbor / Forward Looking Statements This press release contains “forward-looking” statements within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements can be identified by words such as: “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “goal,” “seek,” “believe,” “project,” “estimate,” “expect,” “strategy,” “future,” “likely,” “may,” “should,” “will” and similar references to future periods. These statements are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from what we expect. Examples of forward-looking statements include, among others, the potential therapeutic benefits and economic value of our product candidates. Further information on potential risk factors that could affect our business and its financial results are detailed in our most recent Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2016, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), and other reports as filed with the SEC. We undertake no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether written or oral, that may be made from time to time, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Gayle Roberts, P.E., President and CEO of Stanley Consultants, has been elected to a two-year term as Vice Chair of the American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC). Stanley Consultants provides engineering, environmental, and construction services worldwide. The ACEC is a large federation of 51 state and regional councils representing America's engineering industry. The organization is composed of more than 5,000 firms representing more than 500,000 employees throughout the country who are engaged in engineering. Roberts has been an active member of the ACEC and its Iowa organization for many years. She is a graduate of ACEC’s Senior Executives Institute. She has been active on its Design Professionals Coalition and currently serves on its Executive Committee. She serves as National Director for ACEC/Iowa and has held numerous leadership positions in the state organization including president. “We very much look forward to having Gayle Roberts serve on our Executive Committee,” said David A Raymond, President and CEO of ACEC. “Her leadership of Stanley Consultants and many other contributions to our industry over the years were recognized by the ACEC Board of Directors in elevating her to the Executive Committee position. She represents the highest level of professionalism, integrity and vision.” With 35 years of experience in the engineering and construction industry, Roberts is well suited for the post. She joined Stanley Consultants in 1981 and held positions including Business Leader, Project Manager, Resident Engineer, Industrial Market Leader and Business Development Manager. In 2007, she was elected the fifth president in the company's history. She is a licensed professional engineer, and holds a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering from Iowa State University and a Master’s of Business Administration from St. Ambrose University. About Stanley Consultants: Founded in 1913, Stanley Consultants is a global consulting engineering firm that provides program management, planning, engineering, environmental and construction services worldwide. Recognized for its commitment to client service and a passion to make a difference, Stanley Consultants brings global knowledge, experience and capabilities to serve clients in the energy, water, transportation and Federal markets. Since 1913, Stanley Consultants has successfully completed more than 25,000 engagements in all 50 states, U.S. territories, and in 110 countries. For more information on Stanley Consultants, please visit http://www.stanleyconsultants.com.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Yares Art is pleased to present "Manuel Neri: Singularity of Form & Surface," the first solo exhibition at the gallery's New York location, featuring bronze sculptures and drawings from the noted California artist. The exhibition runs from February 23rd through April 8th, 2017, with a preview reception on Thursday, February 23rd from 5:30 to 7:30pm at Yares Art’s new location on the 4th floor at 745 Fifth Avenue, New York. An 88-page catalogue published for the exhibition is available at the gallery. Gallery owner Dennis Yares writes in the exhibition catalogue that Manuel Neri’s work “continues a Modernist figurative tradition advanced in the 20th century by such artists as Alberto Giacometti and Marino Marini, yet Neri’s approach to the figure is matchless and very much his own. For Neri, the sculptural figure remains a viable and relevant vehicle capable of speaking in contemporary terms...” Neri, whose career now spans six decades, has exhibited with Yares galleries in Scottsdale, Arizona, and Santa Fe, New Mexico, since 1991. This is his first solo New York exhibition in ten years. Manuel Neri (b. 1930) is recognized for his life-size figurative sculptures and reliefs in plaster, bronze, and marble, their complex surfaces sanded, gouged, or painted as a means of directing the gestural thrust. The life-size bronze figures and maquettes featured in this exhibition are treated with the artist’s signature “Alborada patina,” a white painted surface layered with yellow glazes, that highlights the glow of the bronze and the sculptures’ formal and gestural essence. In Neri's work with the figure, he conveys an emotional inner state that is revealed through body language, gesture, and surface. During the past four decades, Neri has worked primarily with the same model, Mary Julia Klimenko, creating drawings and sculptures that merge contemporary sculptural concerns with classical forms. Since 1965 Neri has worked in his studio in Benicia, California; in 1981 he purchased a studio in Carrara, Italy, for working in marble. Neri initially became known in the 1960s for his association with the Bay Area Figurative movement. During the 1950s, he was a member of the artist-run cooperative Six Gallery in San Francisco where, in October 1955, he helped organize the "6 Poets at 6 Gallery" poetry reading, a landmark Beat era event where Allen Ginsberg gave the first public reading of “Howl.” In 1959, Neri was an original member of the Rat Bastard Protective Association, along with Bruce Conner, Joan Brown, Jay DeFeo, and other artists. (In the early 1960s Neri was married to painter Joan Brown, though their relationship and artistic collaboration dated back several years prior to that.) Neri taught sculpture at California School of Fine Arts (1959–65) and UC Berkeley Art Department (1963-4), and was on the art department faculty at the University of California, Davis from 1965-99. Awards include the International Sculpture Center’s 2006 Lifetime Achievement Award in Contemporary Sculpture, the 2008 Bay Area Treasure Award from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and many others. Museums holding works by Manuel Neri include the Art Institute of Chicago; Denver Art Museum; El Paso Museum of Art; Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco; Honolulu Museum of Art; Indianapolis Museum of Art; Memphis Brooks Museum; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Manetti Shrem Museum, Davis, California; Minneapolis Institute of Art; Nasher Gallery at Duke University; Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas; National Gallery of Art, Washington DC; Oakland Museum of California; Palm Springs Art Museum; Portland Art Museum, Oregon; San Diego Museum of Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; San Jose Museum of Art; Seattle Art Museum; University Museums, Iowa State University, Ames; Whitney Museum of American Art; Yale University Art Gallery, and others. Yares Art champions primarily major Postwar Abstract Expressionist and Color Field artists and has represented the Milton Avery Estate for the past five decades. The gallery’s inaugural exhibition featured “Helen Frankenthaler and L.M.N.O.P,” with works by Frankenthaler, Morris Louis, Robert Motherwell, Kenneth Noland, Jules Olitski, and Larry Poons and was hailed by writer David Ebony as “A rarity in New York, … a concise overview of the Color Field movement of the late 1950s and ’60s, whose heroic scaled canvases and immersive, panoramic viewing experiences are little known by younger generations of artists and art-lovers.” (Nov. 26, 2016, artnet.com) Yares Art is located at 745 Fifth Avenue, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10151 (212) 256-0969. http://www.yaresart.com


Hong M.,Iowa State University | DeGrado W.F.,University of California at San Francisco
Protein Science | Year: 2012

The influenza M2 protein forms an acid-activated and drug-sensitive proton channel in the virus envelope that is important for the virus lifecycle. The functional properties and high-resolution structures of this proton channel have been extensively studied to understand the mechanisms of proton conduction and drug inhibition. We review biochemical and electrophysiological studies of M2 and discuss how high-resolution structures have transformed our understanding of this proton channel. Comparison of structures obtained in different membrane-mimetic solvents and under different pH using X-ray crystallography, solution NMR, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy revealed how the M2 structure depends on the environment and showed that the pharmacologically relevant drug-binding site lies in the transmembrane (TM) pore. Competing models of proton conduction have been evaluated using biochemical experiments, high-resolution structural methods, and computational modeling. These results are converging to a model in which a histidine residue in the TM domain mediates proton relay with water, aided by microsecond conformational dynamics of the imidazole ring. These mechanistic insights are guiding the design of new inhibitors that target drug-resistant M2 variants and may be relevant for other proton channels. © 2012 The Protein Society.


Caprio M.A.,University of Notre Dame | Maris P.,Iowa State University | Vary J.P.,Iowa State University
Physics Letters, Section B: Nuclear, Elementary Particle and High-Energy Physics | Year: 2013

The emergence of rotational bands is observed in no-core configuration interaction (NCCI) calculations for the odd-mass Be isotopes (7 ≤ A≤ 13) with the JISP16 nucleon-nucleon interaction, as evidenced by rotational patterns for excitation energies, quadrupole moments, and E2 transitions. Yrast and low-lying excited bands are found. The results demonstrate the possibility of well-developed rotational structure in NCCI calculations using a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Leckband D.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Sivasankar S.,Iowa State University
Current Opinion in Cell Biology | Year: 2012

Classical cadherins are the principle adhesive proteins at cohesive intercellular junctions, and are essential proteins for morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis. Because subtype-dependent differences in cadherin adhesion are at the heart of cadherin functions, several structural and biophysical approaches have been used to elucidate relationships between cadherin structures, biophysical properties of cadherin bonds, and cadherin-dependent cell functions. Some experimental approaches appeared to provide conflicting views of the cadherin binding mechanism. However, recent structural and biophysical data, as well as computer simulations generated new insights into classical cadherin binding that increasingly reconcile diverse experimental findings. This review summarizes these recent findings, and highlights both the consistencies and remaining challenges needed to generate a comprehensive model of cadherin interactions that is consistent with all available experimental data. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Lee J.-M.,University of Nebraska at Omaha | Kim Y.,Iowa State University | Welk G.J.,Iowa State University
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise | Year: 2014

BACKGROUND: Many consumer-based monitors are marketed to provide personal information on the levels of physical activity and daily energy expenditure (EE), but little or no information is available to substantiate their validity. PURPOSE: This study aimed to examine the validity of EE estimates from a variety of consumer-based, physical activity monitors under free-living conditions. METHODS: Sixty (26.4 ± 5.7 yr) healthy males (n = 30) and females (n = 30) wore eight different types of activity monitors simultaneously while completing a 69-min protocol. The monitors included the BodyMedia FIT armband worn on the left arm, the DirectLife monitor around the neck, the Fitbit One, the Fitbit Zip, and the ActiGraph worn on the belt, as well as the Jawbone Up and Basis B1 Band monitor on the wrist. The validity of the EE estimates from each monitor was evaluated relative to criterion values concurrently obtained from a portable metabolic system (i.e., Oxycon Mobile). Differences from criterion measures were expressed as a mean absolute percent error and were evaluated using 95% equivalence testing. RESULTS: For overall group comparisons, the mean absolute percent error values (computed as the average absolute value of the group-level errors) were 9.3%, 10.1%, 10.4%, 12.2%, 12.6%, 12.8%, 13.0%, and 23.5% for the BodyMedia FIT, Fitbit Zip, Fitbit One, Jawbone Up, ActiGraph, DirectLife, NikeFuel Band, and Basis B1 Band, respectively. The results from the equivalence testing showed that the estimates from the BodyMedia FIT, Fitbit Zip, and NikeFuel Band (90% confidence interval = 341.1-359.4) were each within the 10% equivalence zone around the indirect calorimetry estimate. CONCLUSIONS: The indicators of the agreement clearly favored the BodyMedia FIT armband, but promising preliminary findings were also observed with the Fitbit Zip. © 2014 by the American College of Sports Medicine.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE-2007-3-1-03 | Award Amount: 11.21M | Year: 2008

Replacing fossil oil with renewable resources is perhaps the most urgent need and the most challenging task that human society faces today. Cracking fossil hydrocarbons and building the desired chemicals with advanced organic chemistry usually requires many times more energy than is contained in the final product. Thus, using plant material in the chemical industry does not only replace the fossil material contained in the final product but also save substantial energy in the processing. Of particular interest are seed oils which show a great variation in their composition between different plant species. Many of the oil qualities found in wild species would be very attractive for the chemical industry if they could be obtained at moderate costs in bulk quantities and with a secure supply. Genetic engineering of vegetable oil qualities in high yielding oil crops could in a relatively short time frame yield such products. This project aims at developing such added value oils in dedicated industrial oil crops mainly in form of various wax esters particularly suited for lubrication. This project brings together the most prominent scientists in plant lipid biotechnology in an unprecedented world-wide effort in order to produce added value oils in industrial oil crops within the time frame of four years as well as develop a tool box of genes und understanding of lipid cellular metabolism in order for rational designing of vast array of industrial oil qualities in oil crops. Since GM technologies that will be used in the project are met with great scepticism in Europe it is crucial that ideas, expectations and results are communicated to the public and that methods, ethics, risks and risk assessment are open for debate. The keywords of our communication strategies will be openness and an understanding of public concerns.


Patent
Spectral Energies, LLC, U.S. Air force and Iowa State University | Date: 2013-02-15

A high-energy, high-power, burst-mode laser is disclosed. The laser comprises a master oscillator, which generates a signal. The signal may be a continuous signal or a pulsed signal. The master oscillator optically couples to a pulse picker that creates a train of pulses from the signal, and the spacing between the pulses of the train of pulses ranges from ten nanoseconds to one millisecond. The pulse picker is optically coupled to a first diode-pumped amplifier that amplifies the train of pulses to create a first amplified pulse train.


Patent
Foundation University, North Carolina State University and Iowa State University | Date: 2011-06-08

Compositions and methods for providing cyst nematode resistance are provided. One aspect provides transgenic plants or cells comprising an inhibitory nucleic acid specific for one or more cyst nematode esophageal gland cell polypeptides. Other aspects provide transgenic plants or cells resistant to at least two different cyst nematode species.


Patent
DuPont Pioneer, Iowa State University, North Carolina State University, Foundation University and University of Missouri | Date: 2014-03-12

The present invention comprises methods and compositions for controlling nematode parasitism in host plant. The present invention comprises novel polynucleotides and polypeptides encoded by such polynucleotides comprising one or more nucleic acid sequences disclosed herein having a nucleotide sequence comprising any one of SEQ ID NO: 1-142 or 161, a fragment or variant thereof, or a complement thereof, or a polypeptide sequence comprising any one of SEQ ID NO: 143-160, a fragment or variant thereof.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 600.00K | Year: 2010

The objectives of this Phase-II research effort is focused on transitioning noninvasive diagnostic techniques based on ultrafast lasers for characterizing nanoenergetic materials and their performance in rocket engine environments. Through the use of ultrafast laser imaging and spectroscopy, it is possible to isolate and characterize each physical process from initiation through energy release and to do so noninvasively. The specific objectives of this effort are (1) in-situ characterization of nanoenergetic ignition and heat release using picosecond (ps) and femtosecond (fs) time-resolved spectroscopy in bench-scale micro- and macroscale reactors, and (2) development of high-bandwidth (1-10 kHz) femtosecond CARS thermometry for directly measuring the effects of novel energetic materials on energy release in transient, high-pressure rocket engine environments. These studies will focus on the effects of nanoparticle characteristics, such as passivation and agglomeration, on performance metrics, such as heat release rate and flame propagation. During this effort, various commercial nanoparticles as well as specially synthesized nanoparticles will be evaluated to assess their potential for rocket propulsion applications. The improved diagnostic capability will play a key role in the synthesis of novel energetic materials, development and validation of predictive numerical models, and the design of propulsion systems that utilize these materials. BENEFIT: The reliability and performance of rocket combustors can be severely degraded by dynamic system behavior that is enhanced under high energy density conditions. Predicting and controlling this behavior becomes even more critical with the use of novel energetic materials and new additized propellants. The proposed research effort will provide new diagnostic capabilities that will enable the Air Force and original equipment manufacturers to address the challenges associated with nanoenergetic initiation, ignition, hot-spot formation, shock-wave formation, propagation, and energy release. New capabilities afforded by ultrafast diagnostics include the measurement of reactions with picosecond resolution, measurement of temperatures and species with high spatial resolution, measurement of surface phenomena relevant to solid- and gas-phase chemistry, and measurement in unsteady, high-pressure environments. The diagnostic systems developed in this work will transition emerging instrumentation based on ultrafast laser technology for use in educational institutions, DoD laboratories, and industry. This will play a key role in the development of novel energetic materials, validation of predictive numerical models, and the design of propulsion systems that utilize these materials. Ultimately, this will lead to improved control strategies ensuring rapid and stable combustion during critical phases of rocket propulsion.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 600.00K | Year: 2010

The objectives of this Phase-II research effort is focused on transitioning noninvasive diagnostic techniques based on ultrafast lasers for characterizing nanoenergetic materials and their performance in rocket engine environments. Through the use of ultrafast laser imaging and spectroscopy, it is possible to isolate and characterize each physical process from initiation through energy release and to do so noninvasively. The specific objectives of this effort are (1) in-situ characterization of nanoenergetic ignition and heat release using picosecond (ps) and femtosecond (fs) time-resolved spectroscopy in bench-scale micro- and macroscale reactors, and (2) development of high-bandwidth (1-10 kHz) femtosecond CARS thermometry for directly measuring the effects of novel energetic materials on energy release in transient, high-pressure rocket engine environments. These studies will focus on the effects of nanoparticle characteristics, such as passivation and agglomeration, on performance metrics, such as heat release rate and flame propagation. During this effort, various commercial nanoparticles as well as specially synthesized nanoparticles will be evaluated to assess their potential for rocket propulsion applications. The improved diagnostic capability will play a key role in the synthesis of novel energetic materials, development and validation of predictive numerical models, and the design of propulsion systems that utilize these materials. BENEFIT: The reliability and performance of rocket combustors can be severely degraded by dynamic system behavior that is enhanced under high energy density conditions. Predicting and controlling this behavior becomes even more critical with the use of novel energetic materials and new additized propellants. The proposed research effort will provide new diagnostic capabilities that will enable the Air Force and original equipment manufacturers to address the challenges associated with nanoenergetic initiation, ignition, hot-spot formation, shock-wave formation, propagation, and energy release. New capabilities afforded by ultrafast diagnostics include the measurement of reactions with picosecond resolution, measurement of temperatures and species with high spatial resolution, measurement of surface phenomena relevant to solid- and gas-phase chemistry, and measurement in unsteady, high-pressure environments. The diagnostic systems developed in this work will transition emerging instrumentation based on ultrafast laser technology for use in educational institutions, DoD laboratories, and industry. This will play a key role in the development of novel energetic materials, validation of predictive numerical models, and the design of propulsion systems that utilize these materials. Ultimately, this will lead to improved control strategies ensuring rapid and stable combustion during critical phases of rocket propulsion.


Gundersen C.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Kreider B.,Iowa State University | Pepper J.,University of Virginia
Journal of Econometrics | Year: 2012

Children in households reporting the receipt of free or reduced-price school meals through the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) are more likely to have negative health outcomes than observationally similar nonparticipants. Assessing causal effects of the program is made difficult, however, by missing counterfactuals and systematic underreporting of program participation. Combining survey data with auxiliary administrative information on the size of the NSLP caseload, we extend nonparametric partial identification methods that account for endogenous selection and nonrandom classification error in a single framework. Similar to a regression discontinuity design, we introduce a new way to conceptualize the monotone instrumental variable (MIV) assumption using eligibility criteria as monotone instruments. Under relatively weak assumptions, we find evidence that the receipt of free and reduced-price lunches improves the health outcomes of children. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Patent
DuPont Pioneer, Iowa State University, University of Missouri, Foundation University and North Carolina State University | Date: 2014-03-12

The present invention comprises methods and compositions for controlling nematode parasitism in host plant. The present invention comprises novel polynucleotides and polypeptides encoded by such polynucleotides comprising one or more nucleic acid sequences disclosed herein having a nucleotide sequence comprising any one of SEQ ID NOs: 1-142, a fragment or variant thereof, or a complement thereof, or a polypeptide sequence comprising any one of SEQ ID NOs: 143-159, a fragment or variant thereof.


Patent
University of Missouri, INC Research, The United States Of America, Iowa State University, Foundation University and North Carolina State University | Date: 2011-07-13

Methods of inhibiting plant parasitic nematodes, methods of obtaining transgenic plants useful for inhibiting such nematodes, and transgenic plants that are resistant to plant parasitic nematodes through inhibition of plant nematode CLE peptide receptor genes are provided. Methods for expressing genes at plant parasitic nematode feeding sites with plant nematode CLE peptide receptor gene promoters are also provided, along with nematode CLE peptide receptor gene promoters that are useful for expressing genes in nematode feeding sites as well as transgenic plants and nematode resistant transgenic plants comprising the promoters.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

Orthopedic Sports Medicine Surgeon Serves Patients in the Newnan and Fayetteville Areas ​​​​OrthoAtlanta is pleased to welcome orthopedic surgeon, David A. Brcka, M.D., to its orthopedic and sports medicine practice, bringing expertise in sports medicine to patients in the Newnan and Fayetteville areas. Board certified, and fellowship trained in sports medicine, Dr. Brcka holds advanced training and a special interest in arthroscopic hip preservation surgery, a minimally-invasive procedure for treating many painful hip conditions, including hip impingement and cartilage tears. Dr. Brcka’s practice includes general orthopedics and sports medicine, providing arthroscopic (minimally-invasive) treatment of a variety of hip, knee and shoulder conditions. Dr. Brcka is also skilled in total knee and partial knee replacement, as well as total and reverse shoulder replacement.  Prior to relocating to Georgia, Dr. Brcka was a partner and attending physician at the Sports Medicine Institute in Clermont, Florida. “Dr. Brcka joins the OrthoAtlanta orthopedic sports medicine group in Newnan and Fayetteville to serve patients with many types of hip, knee and shoulder disorders,” stated Dr. Michael Behr, OrthoAtlanta Medical Director. “While completing his fellowship, Dr. Brcka trained under the direction of Dr. Christopher Larson, M.D., a widely recognized pioneer in hip arthroscopy. Today, Dr. Brcka brings this expertise to OrthoAtlanta to provide arthroscopic hip preservation surgery, and other arthroscopic treatments, to our patients.” Dr. David Brcka graduated from Iowa State University, in Ames, Iowa, with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology. As an undergraduate student at ISU, Dr. Brcka was a member of the Iowa State University football team, and was elected as the first sophomore co-captain in the team’s 100-year history. His love of football and sports led him to his interest in sports medicine and treating sports injuries. Dr. Brcka received his Doctor of Medicine degree at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in Iowa City, Iowa. He completed his Orthopaedic Surgery Residency at Orlando Regional Healthcare in Orlando, Florida, followed by sports medicine fellowship training at Minnesota Orthopedic Sports Medicine Institute in Eden Prairie, MN. Dr. Brcka is a member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Dr. Brcka is an avid cyclist and mountain bike enthusiast. He selected the Atlanta area to make his permanent home in order to partake in the vast cycling challenges available in the nearby north Georgia mountains. Dr. Brcka is also a certified pilot and enjoys recreational flying. Appointments can be scheduled with Dr. David Brcka (pronounced Burch-ka) at OrthoAtlanta locations in Newnan, 770-460-4747 and Fayetteville, 770-460-1900. ​OrthoAtlanta is one of the largest orthopaedic and sports medicine practices in the greater Atlanta, Georgia area. With 38 physicians serving in 12 offices, the physician-owned practice is dedicated to providing the highest level of patient care for injury or deformity of muscles, joints, bones and spine. OrthoAtlanta offers convenient accessibility to a full range of musculoskeletal surgeons, specialists and patient services including on-site physical therapy, pain management care, six MRI imaging centers and workers’ compensation coordination. OrthoAtlanta Surgery Centers in Austell and Fayetteville provide cost-effective, same-day surgical procedures in an accredited outpatient center. Comprehensive operative and non-operative musculoskeletal care and expertise includes sports medicine, arthroscopic surgery, hip replacement, knee replacement, neck and spine surgery, elbow and shoulder surgery, foot and ankle surgery, pain management, arthritis treatment, general orthopedics, work related injuries and acute orthopaedic urgent care.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

Parents are more likely to change their child’s lifestyle if schools offer educational materials alongside body mass index screening results, a new study shows. Some parents in the study received only BMI results, while others had access to the Family Nutrition and Physical Activity screening tool, an online tool designed to help parents evaluate their home environments and practices. “The FNPA assessment can be a good supplement to any school obesity prevention program and it is also useful for clinical evaluations,” says Greg Welk, professor of kinesiology at Iowa State University. “Some clinics are now using it in parent well-child visits so that pediatricians can advise parents about how to help their kids.” Welk says the supplemental information appeared to help parents in the study understand BMI results, as well as identify strategies to take at home, such as offering more fruits and vegetables, limiting screen time, helping their child be more active, and making sure he or she gets enough sleep. The study, published in Childhood Obesity, analyzed nearly 1,500 parental surveys from 31 Pennsylvania elementary schools. As of 2012, 21 states required schools to measure and collect BMI statistics. However, as researchers explained in the paper, a third of these schools did not require parental notification and only one-quarter had a policy regarding referrals. Welk says BMI is useful for school screening because it is quick and non-invasive. However, the statistics are of little use if not shared with parents. “The use of BMI screening on a regular basis can help schools by providing information to help evaluate changes at the school level. It can also directly help individual children and parents to potentially identify growth patterns that may predispose youth to becoming overweight or obese,” Welk says. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the Institute of Medicine have endorsed BMI screening for use in school assessments, but it is important to follow recommended practices for assessment and notification, he adds. Supplemental information such as the FNPA is also recommended since it gives parents information that they can use to help their child. Obesity affects one in six children and teens in the US, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The researchers say their results show there is potential to increase awareness and access to educational tools related to BMI reports. If this information prompts parents to make changes, it could help reduce obesity rates. In the paper, the researchers cited prevalence estimates that indicate more than 17 percent of American youth are obese, but very few parents identify their own children as having weight problems. As few as 2 percent of parents with overweight children and 17 percent of parents with obese children describe their children as overweight. Lisa Bailey-Davis with Geisinger Health System led the work, which was part of a larger study funded by the National Institutes of Health. Welk led the overall project along with former PhD student, Karissa Peyer, now at the University of Tennessee-Chattanooga.


Soukoulis C.M.,Iowa State University | Soukoulis C.M.,Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas | Wegener M.,Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
Nature Photonics | Year: 2011

Photonic metamaterials are man-made structures composed of tailored micro- or nanostructured metallodielectric subwavelength building blocks. This deceptively simple yet powerful concept allows the realization of many new and unusual optical properties, such as magnetism at optical frequencies, negative refractive index, large positive refractive index, zero reflection through impedance matching, perfect absorption, giant circular dichroism and enhanced nonlinear optical properties. Possible applications of metamaterials include ultrahigh-resolution imaging systems, compact polarization optics and cloaking devices. This Review describes recent progress in the fabrication of three-dimensional metamaterial structures and discusses some of the remaining challenges. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has ranked the best colleges and universities with online programs in the state of Iowa for 2017. Of the 17 four-year schools that were ranked, University of Iowa, Iowa State University, Buena Vista University, Saint Ambrose University and University of Northern Iowa came in as the top five institutions. Iowa’s top 14 two-year schools were also included, with Western Iowa Tech Community, Kirkwood Community College, Iowa Lakes Community College, Eastern Iowa Community College and Des Moines Area Community College taking the top five spots. “By 2025, 68 percent of all jobs in Iowa will require postsecondary training or education, according to research from the Iowa College Student Aid Commission,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “The online programs at schools on our list provide the best opportunities for students to meet their educational and career goals.” To earn a spot on the Best Online Schools list, Iowa colleges and universities must be institutionally accredited, public or private not-for-profit entities and have a minimum of one online certificate or degree program. Each college is also scored based on more than a dozen unique data points that include graduation rates, student/teacher ratios, employment services and financial aid availability. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: The Best Online Four-Year Schools in Iowa for 2017 include the following: Allen College Briar Cliff University Buena Vista University Dordt College Graceland University-Lamoni Iowa State University Iowa Wesleyan University Maharishi University of Management Morningside College Mount Mercy University Northwestern College Saint Ambrose University University of Dubuque University of Iowa University of Northern Iowa Upper Iowa University William Penn University Iowa’s Best Online Two-Year Schools for 2017 include the following: Des Moines Area Community College Eastern Iowa Community College District Ellsworth Community College Hawkeye Community College Indian Hills Community College Iowa Central Community College Iowa Lakes Community College Kirkwood Community College Marshalltown Community College Northeast Iowa Community College-Calmar Northwest Iowa Community College Southeastern Community College Southwestern Community College Western Iowa Tech Community College ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.

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