Ames, IA, United States
Ames, IA, United States

Iowa State University of Science and Technology, more commonly known as Iowa State University, Iowa State, or ISU, a Land grant of the Iowa university system, is a public land-grant and space-grant research university located in Ames, Iowa, United States. Until 1959 it was known as the Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts.Founded in 1858 and coeducational from its start, Iowa State became the nation’s first designated land-grant institution when the Iowa Legislature accepted the provisions of the 1862 Morrill Act on September 11, 1862, making Iowa the first state in the nation to do so. Iowa State's academic offerings are administered today through eight colleges, including the graduate college, that offer over 100 bachelor's degree programs, 112 master's degree programs, and 83 at the Ph.D. level, plus a professional degree program in Veterinary Medicine.ISU is classified as a Research University with very high research activity by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. The university is a group member of the prestigious American Association of Universities and the Universities Research Association, and a charter member of the Big 12 Conference. Wikipedia.


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Patent
Iowa State University | Date: 2015-02-12

In some examples, a method of forming alane (AlH_(3)), the method comprising reacting one of: 1) a MAlH_(4), wherein M is an alkali metal; 2) alkali-metal hydride, MH; or 3) alkali-metal with one or more aluminum halides (AlX_(3), where X is a halogen), via a mechanochemical process, to form the alane, wherein the reaction is substantially solvent free and carried out in an environment with a temperature between approximately 250 K and approximately 330 K.


Patent
Iowa State University | Date: 2016-10-27

The present invention is directed to polyisocyanates and polyurethanes derived therefrom. In various embodiments, the present invention provides polyisocyanates, methods of making the polyisocyanates from fused bicyclic alcohols, polyurethanes, and methods of making the polyurethanes from the polyisocyanates.


Patent
Iowa State University | Date: 2016-09-29

To better control part quality of 3D printed parts, the temperature of an extruder filament using a secondary heat source is provided. A heat source, such as an infrared heat source, can be used to heat the filament of a 3D printer to the optimum temperature that will enhance welding of the filament to a substrate that it is being printed on or to. Such an optimum temperature can be based upon, in part, the temperature of the substrate. A controller or other intelligent control can be used to receive temperature readings of the substrate and/or filament and then can adjust the temperature of the heating source to optimize the temperature of the filament to better combine the filament to the substrate.


Patent
Iowa State University | Date: 2015-11-12

The present invention is directed to methods and compositions for blocking the effect of the intronic inhibitory splicing region of intron 7 of the SMN2 gene. The compositions and methods of the instant invention include short oligonucleotide reagents (e.g., oligoribonucleotides) that effectively target sites in the SMN2 pre-mRNA, thereby modulating the splicing of SMN2 pre-mRNA to include exon 7 in the processed transcript. The short target regions are 8-mers and 5-mers and also include the identification of a single nucleotide base that is essential for initiating a long distance stearic inhibitory interactions as well as novel targets distant from intron 7 which block the intronic inhibitory splicing of the same. These short target regions and concomitant inhibitory blocking oligonucleotides are less expensive and easier to manufacture and are small enough to cross the blood brain barrier.


Patent
Deere & Company and Iowa State University | Date: 2015-09-24

A method and apparatus estimate yield. A first signal is received that an aggregate yield measured by an aggregate yield sensor during a measurement interval. A second signal is received that indicates a plurality of geo-referenced regions across which a harvester has traveled prior to the measurement interval. The method and apparatus allocate, to each of at least two geo-referenced regions, an aggregate yield portion allocation based upon different travel times for crops to the aggregate yield sensor Visual-Infrared Vegetative Index data derived from sensing of plants in selected portions of the electromagnetic spectrum at a time other than harvest. The aggregate yield portion allocations are output.


Patent
Iowa State University | Date: 2016-11-10

The present invention relates nucleic acid molecules that are modulated (e.g., upregulated) by nitrogen in corn, to proteins or polypeptides encoded by these nucleic acid molecules, and promoters of these nucleic acid molecules. The present invention relates to a nucleic acid construct having a nucleic acid molecule that is modulated by nitrogen in corn, as well as to expression systems, host cells, plants, and plant seeds having the nucleic acid construct. The present invention also relates to a method of expressing the nucleic acid molecule that is modulated by nitrogen in a plant by growing a transgenic plant or a plant grown from a transgenic seed transformed with the construct. The present invention further relates to an isolated DNA promoter that can be used to direct nitrogen-regulated expression of an isolated nucleic acid in plants.


Patent
Boehringer Ingelheim and Iowa State University | Date: 2016-08-31

The present invention relates to a vaccine for protecting a piglet against diseases associated with a novel pestivirus. The vaccine commonly includes a pestivirus antigen and, optionally an adjuvant. Methods for protecting pigs against diseases associated with pestivirus, including but not limited to congenital tremors and methods of producing the pestivirus vaccine are also provided.


Jin S.,ETRI | Qiao D.,Iowa State University
IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology | Year: 2012

We analyze the power-saving operation in Third-Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) Long-Term Evolution Advanced (LTE Advanced) wireless networks. Typically, it is an exhausting and complicated job to numerically analyze the performance of power-saving operations since it is necessary to carefully consider every possible probability, make probability-generating functions, and differentiate these functions. Instead, we develop a totally new approach toward simple but accurate derivations. For this purpose, we divide the time period for the steady-state power-saving operation into several independent parts. Then, we analyze the power-saving operation in each part and thereafter combine the results into an aggregate result. The new approach enables us to avoid sophisticated steps while we reach an accurate analytical model. The equations are validated through comparison with simulation results. © 2012 IEEE.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.96K | Year: 2012

ABSTRACT: In this STTR program, Agiltron and Iowa State University (ISU) jointly propose to develop simple material and structural solutions that enable directionally dependent emission in the infrared regime. The highly directional infrared emission has extremely narrow emission patterns and a large difference between high and low emission states. In the Phase I program, the structure will be fabricated on top of a flat silicon substrate. Samples will be provided to the US Air Force for evaluation. The sample will have the following properties that fully fulfill the requirement of this solicitation: ratio of high/low emissivity better than 20, angle of radiation cone as small as 5 degrees. BENEFIT: The technical approach we propose is highly generalizable to the development of infrared lens/filters, beam splitters and other focal plane elements with highly directional emission property. It can be used for thermal management in space and other commercial applications. It can also be used to alter the observability of platforms as a function of angle of observation.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 499.18K | Year: 2012

This STTR is aimed at developing methods and tools to characterize the impact of free-play on control surface flutter and overall stability and performance of the system. A successful completion of this two-phased STTR effort will lead to a modeling, analysis, design, and simulation tool that will provide a state-of-the-art capability for stability and performance analysis for any generic control surface configuration with free-play. It will also provide an optimal design capability for the design of control surfaces for new platforms. The modularity of the tool will allow model generation with varying degrees of fidelity using a combination of analytical, computational, and experimental identification methods. The nonlinear dynamic analysis capabilities in the tool will include newly developed nonlinear analysis techniques which will enable optimization of the design space for control surfaces as well as accurate predictions of stability and performance boundaries for existing platforms. The final product is envisioned to be a software that can: Model, simulate, and analyze the existing control surface geometries with free play and provide stability and performance assessment through useful metric. Optimally design new control surfaces for a specified stability and performance robustness with least restrictive free-play specifications.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.98K | Year: 2010

The aerodynamic performance of aircraft is significantly impacted by the aero-elastic dynamics of its control surfaces. In particular, the dynamics of flutter - an unstable self-excitation of structure due to undesirable coupling of structural flexibility and aerodynamics - has critical impact on the stability and performance of aircraft. The control surface flutter characteristics are affected by the unavoidable free-play which is inherent in the control surface due to manufacturing imperfections. There are no systematic methods to predict free-play effect on flutter. The proposed research will develop a comprehensive tool-suite which will: (a) provide state-of-the-art capability for stability and performance analysis of any generic control surface configuration, (b) allow modeling of control surface dynamics with varying degrees of fidelity using combination of analytical, computational, and experimental identification methods, (c) provide new analysis techniques to enable accurate prediction of stability/performance boundaries for existing platforms, and (d) provide optimal design capability for design of control surfaces for new platforms. The Phase 1 of the project will develope essential elements of the proposed tool-suite to prove the feasibility of the approach and demonstrate the capabilities by using 1950's WADC test data for all-movable un-swept horizontal tail.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Yares Art is pleased to present "Manuel Neri: Singularity of Form & Surface," the first solo exhibition at the gallery's New York location, featuring bronze sculptures and drawings from the noted California artist. The exhibition runs from February 23rd through April 8th, 2017, with a preview reception on Thursday, February 23rd from 5:30 to 7:30pm at Yares Art’s new location on the 4th floor at 745 Fifth Avenue, New York. An 88-page catalogue published for the exhibition is available at the gallery. Gallery owner Dennis Yares writes in the exhibition catalogue that Manuel Neri’s work “continues a Modernist figurative tradition advanced in the 20th century by such artists as Alberto Giacometti and Marino Marini, yet Neri’s approach to the figure is matchless and very much his own. For Neri, the sculptural figure remains a viable and relevant vehicle capable of speaking in contemporary terms...” Neri, whose career now spans six decades, has exhibited with Yares galleries in Scottsdale, Arizona, and Santa Fe, New Mexico, since 1991. This is his first solo New York exhibition in ten years. Manuel Neri (b. 1930) is recognized for his life-size figurative sculptures and reliefs in plaster, bronze, and marble, their complex surfaces sanded, gouged, or painted as a means of directing the gestural thrust. The life-size bronze figures and maquettes featured in this exhibition are treated with the artist’s signature “Alborada patina,” a white painted surface layered with yellow glazes, that highlights the glow of the bronze and the sculptures’ formal and gestural essence. In Neri's work with the figure, he conveys an emotional inner state that is revealed through body language, gesture, and surface. During the past four decades, Neri has worked primarily with the same model, Mary Julia Klimenko, creating drawings and sculptures that merge contemporary sculptural concerns with classical forms. Since 1965 Neri has worked in his studio in Benicia, California; in 1981 he purchased a studio in Carrara, Italy, for working in marble. Neri initially became known in the 1960s for his association with the Bay Area Figurative movement. During the 1950s, he was a member of the artist-run cooperative Six Gallery in San Francisco where, in October 1955, he helped organize the "6 Poets at 6 Gallery" poetry reading, a landmark Beat era event where Allen Ginsberg gave the first public reading of “Howl.” In 1959, Neri was an original member of the Rat Bastard Protective Association, along with Bruce Conner, Joan Brown, Jay DeFeo, and other artists. (In the early 1960s Neri was married to painter Joan Brown, though their relationship and artistic collaboration dated back several years prior to that.) Neri taught sculpture at California School of Fine Arts (1959–65) and UC Berkeley Art Department (1963-4), and was on the art department faculty at the University of California, Davis from 1965-99. Awards include the International Sculpture Center’s 2006 Lifetime Achievement Award in Contemporary Sculpture, the 2008 Bay Area Treasure Award from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and many others. Museums holding works by Manuel Neri include the Art Institute of Chicago; Denver Art Museum; El Paso Museum of Art; Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco; Honolulu Museum of Art; Indianapolis Museum of Art; Memphis Brooks Museum; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Manetti Shrem Museum, Davis, California; Minneapolis Institute of Art; Nasher Gallery at Duke University; Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas; National Gallery of Art, Washington DC; Oakland Museum of California; Palm Springs Art Museum; Portland Art Museum, Oregon; San Diego Museum of Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; San Jose Museum of Art; Seattle Art Museum; University Museums, Iowa State University, Ames; Whitney Museum of American Art; Yale University Art Gallery, and others. Yares Art champions primarily major Postwar Abstract Expressionist and Color Field artists and has represented the Milton Avery Estate for the past five decades. The gallery’s inaugural exhibition featured “Helen Frankenthaler and L.M.N.O.P,” with works by Frankenthaler, Morris Louis, Robert Motherwell, Kenneth Noland, Jules Olitski, and Larry Poons and was hailed by writer David Ebony as “A rarity in New York, … a concise overview of the Color Field movement of the late 1950s and ’60s, whose heroic scaled canvases and immersive, panoramic viewing experiences are little known by younger generations of artists and art-lovers.” (Nov. 26, 2016, artnet.com) Yares Art is located at 745 Fifth Avenue, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10151 (212) 256-0969. http://www.yaresart.com


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

AUSTIN, Texas, Feb. 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Aeglea BioTherapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ:AGLE), a biotechnology company committed to developing enzyme-based therapeutics in the field of amino acid metabolism to treat rare genetic diseases and cancer, today announced the appointment of Suzanne L. Bruhn, Ph.D. to its Board of Directors. Dr. Bruhn previously served as chief executive officer, president and director at Promedior, Inc., a clinical-stage biotechnology company, from 2012 to 2015. “Suzanne’s depth of experience in the early-stage biotechnology space and expertise in orphan diseases will be a valuable addition to our Board,” said David G. Lowe, Ph.D., co-founder, president and chief executive officer of Aeglea. “Her insights and guidance will be a tremendous asset as we further our clinical programs in order to pursue our mission of developing treatments for patients with rare genetic diseases and cancer.” During her time at Promedior, Dr. Bruhn focused the company’s strategy on clinical development for orphan diseases and negotiated the grant of an exclusive option to acquire Promedior to Bristol-Myers Squibb Company in 2015. Prior to Promedior, Dr. Bruhn held a number of roles in strategic and portfolio planning, program management and regulatory affairs at Shire Human Genetic Therapies, formerly known as Transkaryotic Therapies, between 1998 and 2012. She also served on the board of directors of Raptor Pharmaceuticals Corp., a biotechnology company focused on treating rare metabolic disorders, from 2011 until it was sold to Horizon Pharma plc in October 2016. Dr. Bruhn earned her bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Iowa State University of Science and Technology and her Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. About Aeglea BioTherapeutics Aeglea is a biotechnology company committed to developing enzyme-based therapeutics in the field of amino acid metabolism to treat rare genetic diseases and cancer. The company’s engineered human enzymes are designed to modulate the extremes of amino acid metabolism in the blood to reduce toxic levels of amino acids in inborn errors of metabolism or target tumor metabolism for cancer treatment. AEB1102, Aeglea’s lead product candidate, is currently being studied in two ongoing Phase 1 clinical trials in patients with advanced solid tumors and acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (AML/MDS). Additionally, Aeglea is recruiting patients into its ongoing Phase 1/2 trial of AEB1102 for the treatment of patients with Arginase I deficiency. The company is building a pipeline of additional product candidates targeting key amino acids, including AEB4104, which degrades homocystine, a target for an inborn error of metabolism, as well as two potential treatments for cancer, AEB3103, which degrades cysteine/cystine, and AEB2109, which degrades methionine. For more information, please visit http://aegleabio.com. Safe Harbor / Forward Looking Statements This press release contains “forward-looking” statements within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements can be identified by words such as: “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “goal,” “seek,” “believe,” “project,” “estimate,” “expect,” “strategy,” “future,” “likely,” “may,” “should,” “will” and similar references to future periods. These statements are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from what we expect. Examples of forward-looking statements include, among others, the potential therapeutic benefits and economic value of our product candidates. Further information on potential risk factors that could affect our business and its financial results are detailed in our most recent Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2016, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), and other reports as filed with the SEC. We undertake no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether written or oral, that may be made from time to time, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

AUSTIN, Texas, Feb. 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Aeglea BioTherapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ:AGLE), a biotechnology company committed to developing enzyme-based therapeutics in the field of amino acid metabolism to treat rare genetic diseases and cancer, today announced the appointment of Suzanne L. Bruhn, Ph.D. to its Board of Directors. Dr. Bruhn previously served as chief executive officer, president and director at Promedior, Inc., a clinical-stage biotechnology company, from 2012 to 2015. “Suzanne’s depth of experience in the early-stage biotechnology space and expertise in orphan diseases will be a valuable addition to our Board,” said David G. Lowe, Ph.D., co-founder, president and chief executive officer of Aeglea. “Her insights and guidance will be a tremendous asset as we further our clinical programs in order to pursue our mission of developing treatments for patients with rare genetic diseases and cancer.” During her time at Promedior, Dr. Bruhn focused the company’s strategy on clinical development for orphan diseases and negotiated the grant of an exclusive option to acquire Promedior to Bristol-Myers Squibb Company in 2015. Prior to Promedior, Dr. Bruhn held a number of roles in strategic and portfolio planning, program management and regulatory affairs at Shire Human Genetic Therapies, formerly known as Transkaryotic Therapies, between 1998 and 2012. She also served on the board of directors of Raptor Pharmaceuticals Corp., a biotechnology company focused on treating rare metabolic disorders, from 2011 until it was sold to Horizon Pharma plc in October 2016. Dr. Bruhn earned her bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Iowa State University of Science and Technology and her Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. About Aeglea BioTherapeutics Aeglea is a biotechnology company committed to developing enzyme-based therapeutics in the field of amino acid metabolism to treat rare genetic diseases and cancer. The company’s engineered human enzymes are designed to modulate the extremes of amino acid metabolism in the blood to reduce toxic levels of amino acids in inborn errors of metabolism or target tumor metabolism for cancer treatment. AEB1102, Aeglea’s lead product candidate, is currently being studied in two ongoing Phase 1 clinical trials in patients with advanced solid tumors and acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (AML/MDS). Additionally, Aeglea is recruiting patients into its ongoing Phase 1/2 trial of AEB1102 for the treatment of patients with Arginase I deficiency. The company is building a pipeline of additional product candidates targeting key amino acids, including AEB4104, which degrades homocystine, a target for an inborn error of metabolism, as well as two potential treatments for cancer, AEB3103, which degrades cysteine/cystine, and AEB2109, which degrades methionine. For more information, please visit http://aegleabio.com. Safe Harbor / Forward Looking Statements This press release contains “forward-looking” statements within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements can be identified by words such as: “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “goal,” “seek,” “believe,” “project,” “estimate,” “expect,” “strategy,” “future,” “likely,” “may,” “should,” “will” and similar references to future periods. These statements are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from what we expect. Examples of forward-looking statements include, among others, the potential therapeutic benefits and economic value of our product candidates. Further information on potential risk factors that could affect our business and its financial results are detailed in our most recent Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2016, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), and other reports as filed with the SEC. We undertake no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether written or oral, that may be made from time to time, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

AUSTIN, Texas, Feb. 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Aeglea BioTherapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ:AGLE), a biotechnology company committed to developing enzyme-based therapeutics in the field of amino acid metabolism to treat rare genetic diseases and cancer, today announced the appointment of Suzanne L. Bruhn, Ph.D. to its Board of Directors. Dr. Bruhn previously served as chief executive officer, president and director at Promedior, Inc., a clinical-stage biotechnology company, from 2012 to 2015. “Suzanne’s depth of experience in the early-stage biotechnology space and expertise in orphan diseases will be a valuable addition to our Board,” said David G. Lowe, Ph.D., co-founder, president and chief executive officer of Aeglea. “Her insights and guidance will be a tremendous asset as we further our clinical programs in order to pursue our mission of developing treatments for patients with rare genetic diseases and cancer.” During her time at Promedior, Dr. Bruhn focused the company’s strategy on clinical development for orphan diseases and negotiated the grant of an exclusive option to acquire Promedior to Bristol-Myers Squibb Company in 2015. Prior to Promedior, Dr. Bruhn held a number of roles in strategic and portfolio planning, program management and regulatory affairs at Shire Human Genetic Therapies, formerly known as Transkaryotic Therapies, between 1998 and 2012. She also served on the board of directors of Raptor Pharmaceuticals Corp., a biotechnology company focused on treating rare metabolic disorders, from 2011 until it was sold to Horizon Pharma plc in October 2016. Dr. Bruhn earned her bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Iowa State University of Science and Technology and her Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. About Aeglea BioTherapeutics Aeglea is a biotechnology company committed to developing enzyme-based therapeutics in the field of amino acid metabolism to treat rare genetic diseases and cancer. The company’s engineered human enzymes are designed to modulate the extremes of amino acid metabolism in the blood to reduce toxic levels of amino acids in inborn errors of metabolism or target tumor metabolism for cancer treatment. AEB1102, Aeglea’s lead product candidate, is currently being studied in two ongoing Phase 1 clinical trials in patients with advanced solid tumors and acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (AML/MDS). Additionally, Aeglea is recruiting patients into its ongoing Phase 1/2 trial of AEB1102 for the treatment of patients with Arginase I deficiency. The company is building a pipeline of additional product candidates targeting key amino acids, including AEB4104, which degrades homocystine, a target for an inborn error of metabolism, as well as two potential treatments for cancer, AEB3103, which degrades cysteine/cystine, and AEB2109, which degrades methionine. For more information, please visit http://aegleabio.com. Safe Harbor / Forward Looking Statements This press release contains “forward-looking” statements within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements can be identified by words such as: “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “goal,” “seek,” “believe,” “project,” “estimate,” “expect,” “strategy,” “future,” “likely,” “may,” “should,” “will” and similar references to future periods. These statements are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from what we expect. Examples of forward-looking statements include, among others, the potential therapeutic benefits and economic value of our product candidates. Further information on potential risk factors that could affect our business and its financial results are detailed in our most recent Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2016, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), and other reports as filed with the SEC. We undertake no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether written or oral, that may be made from time to time, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

AUSTIN, Texas, Feb. 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Aeglea BioTherapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ:AGLE), a biotechnology company committed to developing enzyme-based therapeutics in the field of amino acid metabolism to treat rare genetic diseases and cancer, today announced the appointment of Suzanne L. Bruhn, Ph.D. to its Board of Directors. Dr. Bruhn previously served as chief executive officer, president and director at Promedior, Inc., a clinical-stage biotechnology company, from 2012 to 2015. “Suzanne’s depth of experience in the early-stage biotechnology space and expertise in orphan diseases will be a valuable addition to our Board,” said David G. Lowe, Ph.D., co-founder, president and chief executive officer of Aeglea. “Her insights and guidance will be a tremendous asset as we further our clinical programs in order to pursue our mission of developing treatments for patients with rare genetic diseases and cancer.” During her time at Promedior, Dr. Bruhn focused the company’s strategy on clinical development for orphan diseases and negotiated the grant of an exclusive option to acquire Promedior to Bristol-Myers Squibb Company in 2015. Prior to Promedior, Dr. Bruhn held a number of roles in strategic and portfolio planning, program management and regulatory affairs at Shire Human Genetic Therapies, formerly known as Transkaryotic Therapies, between 1998 and 2012. She also served on the board of directors of Raptor Pharmaceuticals Corp., a biotechnology company focused on treating rare metabolic disorders, from 2011 until it was sold to Horizon Pharma plc in October 2016. Dr. Bruhn earned her bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Iowa State University of Science and Technology and her Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. About Aeglea BioTherapeutics Aeglea is a biotechnology company committed to developing enzyme-based therapeutics in the field of amino acid metabolism to treat rare genetic diseases and cancer. The company’s engineered human enzymes are designed to modulate the extremes of amino acid metabolism in the blood to reduce toxic levels of amino acids in inborn errors of metabolism or target tumor metabolism for cancer treatment. AEB1102, Aeglea’s lead product candidate, is currently being studied in two ongoing Phase 1 clinical trials in patients with advanced solid tumors and acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (AML/MDS). Additionally, Aeglea is recruiting patients into its ongoing Phase 1/2 trial of AEB1102 for the treatment of patients with Arginase I deficiency. The company is building a pipeline of additional product candidates targeting key amino acids, including AEB4104, which degrades homocystine, a target for an inborn error of metabolism, as well as two potential treatments for cancer, AEB3103, which degrades cysteine/cystine, and AEB2109, which degrades methionine. For more information, please visit http://aegleabio.com. Safe Harbor / Forward Looking Statements This press release contains “forward-looking” statements within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements can be identified by words such as: “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “goal,” “seek,” “believe,” “project,” “estimate,” “expect,” “strategy,” “future,” “likely,” “may,” “should,” “will” and similar references to future periods. These statements are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from what we expect. Examples of forward-looking statements include, among others, the potential therapeutic benefits and economic value of our product candidates. Further information on potential risk factors that could affect our business and its financial results are detailed in our most recent Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2016, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), and other reports as filed with the SEC. We undertake no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether written or oral, that may be made from time to time, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Gayle Roberts, P.E., President and CEO of Stanley Consultants, has been elected to a two-year term as Vice Chair of the American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC). Stanley Consultants provides engineering, environmental, and construction services worldwide. The ACEC is a large federation of 51 state and regional councils representing America's engineering industry. The organization is composed of more than 5,000 firms representing more than 500,000 employees throughout the country who are engaged in engineering. Roberts has been an active member of the ACEC and its Iowa organization for many years. She is a graduate of ACEC’s Senior Executives Institute. She has been active on its Design Professionals Coalition and currently serves on its Executive Committee. She serves as National Director for ACEC/Iowa and has held numerous leadership positions in the state organization including president. “We very much look forward to having Gayle Roberts serve on our Executive Committee,” said David A Raymond, President and CEO of ACEC. “Her leadership of Stanley Consultants and many other contributions to our industry over the years were recognized by the ACEC Board of Directors in elevating her to the Executive Committee position. She represents the highest level of professionalism, integrity and vision.” With 35 years of experience in the engineering and construction industry, Roberts is well suited for the post. She joined Stanley Consultants in 1981 and held positions including Business Leader, Project Manager, Resident Engineer, Industrial Market Leader and Business Development Manager. In 2007, she was elected the fifth president in the company's history. She is a licensed professional engineer, and holds a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering from Iowa State University and a Master’s of Business Administration from St. Ambrose University. About Stanley Consultants: Founded in 1913, Stanley Consultants is a global consulting engineering firm that provides program management, planning, engineering, environmental and construction services worldwide. Recognized for its commitment to client service and a passion to make a difference, Stanley Consultants brings global knowledge, experience and capabilities to serve clients in the energy, water, transportation and Federal markets. Since 1913, Stanley Consultants has successfully completed more than 25,000 engagements in all 50 states, U.S. territories, and in 110 countries. For more information on Stanley Consultants, please visit http://www.stanleyconsultants.com.


Ekkekakis P.,Iowa State University | Parfitt G.,University of South Australia | Petruzzello S.J.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign
Sports Medicine | Year: 2011

The public health problem of physical inactivity has proven resistant to research efforts aimed at elucidating its causes and interventions designed to alter its course. Thus, in most industrialized countries, the majority of the population is physically inactive or inadequately active. Most theoretical models of exercise behaviour assume that the decision to engage in exercise is based on cognitive factors (e.g. weighing pros and cons, appraising personal capabilities, evaluating sources of support). Another, still-under-appreciated, possibility is that these decisions are influenced by affective variables, such as whether previous exercise experiences were associated with pleasure or displeasure. This review examines 33 articles published from 1999 to 2009 on the relationship between exercise intensity and affective responses. Unlike 31 studies that were published until 1998 and were examined in a 1999 review, these more recent studies have provided evidence of a relation between the intensity of exercise and affective responses. Pleasure is reduced mainly above the ventilatory or lactate threshold or the onset of blood lactate accumulation. There are pleasant changes at sub-threshold intensities for most individuals, large inter-individual variability close to the ventilatory or lactate threshold and homogeneously negative changes at supra-threshold intensities. When the intensity is self-selected, rather than imposed, it appears to foster greater tolerance to higher intensity levels. The evidence of a dose-response relation between exercise intensity and affect sets the stage for a reconsideration of the rationale behind current guidelines for exercise intensity prescription. Besides effectiveness and safety, it is becoming increasingly clear that the guidelines should take into account whether a certain level of exercise intensity would be likely to cause increases or decreases in pleasure. © 2011 Adis Data Information BV. All rights reserved.


Hong M.,Iowa State University | DeGrado W.F.,University of California at San Francisco
Protein Science | Year: 2012

The influenza M2 protein forms an acid-activated and drug-sensitive proton channel in the virus envelope that is important for the virus lifecycle. The functional properties and high-resolution structures of this proton channel have been extensively studied to understand the mechanisms of proton conduction and drug inhibition. We review biochemical and electrophysiological studies of M2 and discuss how high-resolution structures have transformed our understanding of this proton channel. Comparison of structures obtained in different membrane-mimetic solvents and under different pH using X-ray crystallography, solution NMR, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy revealed how the M2 structure depends on the environment and showed that the pharmacologically relevant drug-binding site lies in the transmembrane (TM) pore. Competing models of proton conduction have been evaluated using biochemical experiments, high-resolution structural methods, and computational modeling. These results are converging to a model in which a histidine residue in the TM domain mediates proton relay with water, aided by microsecond conformational dynamics of the imidazole ring. These mechanistic insights are guiding the design of new inhibitors that target drug-resistant M2 variants and may be relevant for other proton channels. © 2012 The Protein Society.


Caprio M.A.,University of Notre Dame | Maris P.,Iowa State University | Vary J.P.,Iowa State University
Physics Letters, Section B: Nuclear, Elementary Particle and High-Energy Physics | Year: 2013

The emergence of rotational bands is observed in no-core configuration interaction (NCCI) calculations for the odd-mass Be isotopes (7 ≤ A≤ 13) with the JISP16 nucleon-nucleon interaction, as evidenced by rotational patterns for excitation energies, quadrupole moments, and E2 transitions. Yrast and low-lying excited bands are found. The results demonstrate the possibility of well-developed rotational structure in NCCI calculations using a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Leckband D.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Sivasankar S.,Iowa State University
Current Opinion in Cell Biology | Year: 2012

Classical cadherins are the principle adhesive proteins at cohesive intercellular junctions, and are essential proteins for morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis. Because subtype-dependent differences in cadherin adhesion are at the heart of cadherin functions, several structural and biophysical approaches have been used to elucidate relationships between cadherin structures, biophysical properties of cadherin bonds, and cadherin-dependent cell functions. Some experimental approaches appeared to provide conflicting views of the cadherin binding mechanism. However, recent structural and biophysical data, as well as computer simulations generated new insights into classical cadherin binding that increasingly reconcile diverse experimental findings. This review summarizes these recent findings, and highlights both the consistencies and remaining challenges needed to generate a comprehensive model of cadherin interactions that is consistent with all available experimental data. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Lee J.-M.,University of Nebraska at Omaha | Kim Y.,Iowa State University | Welk G.J.,Iowa State University
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise | Year: 2014

BACKGROUND: Many consumer-based monitors are marketed to provide personal information on the levels of physical activity and daily energy expenditure (EE), but little or no information is available to substantiate their validity. PURPOSE: This study aimed to examine the validity of EE estimates from a variety of consumer-based, physical activity monitors under free-living conditions. METHODS: Sixty (26.4 ± 5.7 yr) healthy males (n = 30) and females (n = 30) wore eight different types of activity monitors simultaneously while completing a 69-min protocol. The monitors included the BodyMedia FIT armband worn on the left arm, the DirectLife monitor around the neck, the Fitbit One, the Fitbit Zip, and the ActiGraph worn on the belt, as well as the Jawbone Up and Basis B1 Band monitor on the wrist. The validity of the EE estimates from each monitor was evaluated relative to criterion values concurrently obtained from a portable metabolic system (i.e., Oxycon Mobile). Differences from criterion measures were expressed as a mean absolute percent error and were evaluated using 95% equivalence testing. RESULTS: For overall group comparisons, the mean absolute percent error values (computed as the average absolute value of the group-level errors) were 9.3%, 10.1%, 10.4%, 12.2%, 12.6%, 12.8%, 13.0%, and 23.5% for the BodyMedia FIT, Fitbit Zip, Fitbit One, Jawbone Up, ActiGraph, DirectLife, NikeFuel Band, and Basis B1 Band, respectively. The results from the equivalence testing showed that the estimates from the BodyMedia FIT, Fitbit Zip, and NikeFuel Band (90% confidence interval = 341.1-359.4) were each within the 10% equivalence zone around the indirect calorimetry estimate. CONCLUSIONS: The indicators of the agreement clearly favored the BodyMedia FIT armband, but promising preliminary findings were also observed with the Fitbit Zip. © 2014 by the American College of Sports Medicine.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE-2007-3-1-03 | Award Amount: 11.21M | Year: 2008

Replacing fossil oil with renewable resources is perhaps the most urgent need and the most challenging task that human society faces today. Cracking fossil hydrocarbons and building the desired chemicals with advanced organic chemistry usually requires many times more energy than is contained in the final product. Thus, using plant material in the chemical industry does not only replace the fossil material contained in the final product but also save substantial energy in the processing. Of particular interest are seed oils which show a great variation in their composition between different plant species. Many of the oil qualities found in wild species would be very attractive for the chemical industry if they could be obtained at moderate costs in bulk quantities and with a secure supply. Genetic engineering of vegetable oil qualities in high yielding oil crops could in a relatively short time frame yield such products. This project aims at developing such added value oils in dedicated industrial oil crops mainly in form of various wax esters particularly suited for lubrication. This project brings together the most prominent scientists in plant lipid biotechnology in an unprecedented world-wide effort in order to produce added value oils in industrial oil crops within the time frame of four years as well as develop a tool box of genes und understanding of lipid cellular metabolism in order for rational designing of vast array of industrial oil qualities in oil crops. Since GM technologies that will be used in the project are met with great scepticism in Europe it is crucial that ideas, expectations and results are communicated to the public and that methods, ethics, risks and risk assessment are open for debate. The keywords of our communication strategies will be openness and an understanding of public concerns.


Patent
Spectral Energies, LLC, U.S. Air force and Iowa State University | Date: 2013-02-15

A high-energy, high-power, burst-mode laser is disclosed. The laser comprises a master oscillator, which generates a signal. The signal may be a continuous signal or a pulsed signal. The master oscillator optically couples to a pulse picker that creates a train of pulses from the signal, and the spacing between the pulses of the train of pulses ranges from ten nanoseconds to one millisecond. The pulse picker is optically coupled to a first diode-pumped amplifier that amplifies the train of pulses to create a first amplified pulse train.


Patent
Foundation University, North Carolina State University and Iowa State University | Date: 2011-06-08

Compositions and methods for providing cyst nematode resistance are provided. One aspect provides transgenic plants or cells comprising an inhibitory nucleic acid specific for one or more cyst nematode esophageal gland cell polypeptides. Other aspects provide transgenic plants or cells resistant to at least two different cyst nematode species.


Patent
DuPont Pioneer, Iowa State University, North Carolina State University, Foundation University and University of Missouri | Date: 2014-03-12

The present invention comprises methods and compositions for controlling nematode parasitism in host plant. The present invention comprises novel polynucleotides and polypeptides encoded by such polynucleotides comprising one or more nucleic acid sequences disclosed herein having a nucleotide sequence comprising any one of SEQ ID NO: 1-142 or 161, a fragment or variant thereof, or a complement thereof, or a polypeptide sequence comprising any one of SEQ ID NO: 143-160, a fragment or variant thereof.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 600.00K | Year: 2010

The objectives of this Phase-II research effort is focused on transitioning noninvasive diagnostic techniques based on ultrafast lasers for characterizing nanoenergetic materials and their performance in rocket engine environments. Through the use of ultrafast laser imaging and spectroscopy, it is possible to isolate and characterize each physical process from initiation through energy release and to do so noninvasively. The specific objectives of this effort are (1) in-situ characterization of nanoenergetic ignition and heat release using picosecond (ps) and femtosecond (fs) time-resolved spectroscopy in bench-scale micro- and macroscale reactors, and (2) development of high-bandwidth (1-10 kHz) femtosecond CARS thermometry for directly measuring the effects of novel energetic materials on energy release in transient, high-pressure rocket engine environments. These studies will focus on the effects of nanoparticle characteristics, such as passivation and agglomeration, on performance metrics, such as heat release rate and flame propagation. During this effort, various commercial nanoparticles as well as specially synthesized nanoparticles will be evaluated to assess their potential for rocket propulsion applications. The improved diagnostic capability will play a key role in the synthesis of novel energetic materials, development and validation of predictive numerical models, and the design of propulsion systems that utilize these materials. BENEFIT: The reliability and performance of rocket combustors can be severely degraded by dynamic system behavior that is enhanced under high energy density conditions. Predicting and controlling this behavior becomes even more critical with the use of novel energetic materials and new additized propellants. The proposed research effort will provide new diagnostic capabilities that will enable the Air Force and original equipment manufacturers to address the challenges associated with nanoenergetic initiation, ignition, hot-spot formation, shock-wave formation, propagation, and energy release. New capabilities afforded by ultrafast diagnostics include the measurement of reactions with picosecond resolution, measurement of temperatures and species with high spatial resolution, measurement of surface phenomena relevant to solid- and gas-phase chemistry, and measurement in unsteady, high-pressure environments. The diagnostic systems developed in this work will transition emerging instrumentation based on ultrafast laser technology for use in educational institutions, DoD laboratories, and industry. This will play a key role in the development of novel energetic materials, validation of predictive numerical models, and the design of propulsion systems that utilize these materials. Ultimately, this will lead to improved control strategies ensuring rapid and stable combustion during critical phases of rocket propulsion.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 600.00K | Year: 2010

The objectives of this Phase-II research effort is focused on transitioning noninvasive diagnostic techniques based on ultrafast lasers for characterizing nanoenergetic materials and their performance in rocket engine environments. Through the use of ultrafast laser imaging and spectroscopy, it is possible to isolate and characterize each physical process from initiation through energy release and to do so noninvasively. The specific objectives of this effort are (1) in-situ characterization of nanoenergetic ignition and heat release using picosecond (ps) and femtosecond (fs) time-resolved spectroscopy in bench-scale micro- and macroscale reactors, and (2) development of high-bandwidth (1-10 kHz) femtosecond CARS thermometry for directly measuring the effects of novel energetic materials on energy release in transient, high-pressure rocket engine environments. These studies will focus on the effects of nanoparticle characteristics, such as passivation and agglomeration, on performance metrics, such as heat release rate and flame propagation. During this effort, various commercial nanoparticles as well as specially synthesized nanoparticles will be evaluated to assess their potential for rocket propulsion applications. The improved diagnostic capability will play a key role in the synthesis of novel energetic materials, development and validation of predictive numerical models, and the design of propulsion systems that utilize these materials. BENEFIT: The reliability and performance of rocket combustors can be severely degraded by dynamic system behavior that is enhanced under high energy density conditions. Predicting and controlling this behavior becomes even more critical with the use of novel energetic materials and new additized propellants. The proposed research effort will provide new diagnostic capabilities that will enable the Air Force and original equipment manufacturers to address the challenges associated with nanoenergetic initiation, ignition, hot-spot formation, shock-wave formation, propagation, and energy release. New capabilities afforded by ultrafast diagnostics include the measurement of reactions with picosecond resolution, measurement of temperatures and species with high spatial resolution, measurement of surface phenomena relevant to solid- and gas-phase chemistry, and measurement in unsteady, high-pressure environments. The diagnostic systems developed in this work will transition emerging instrumentation based on ultrafast laser technology for use in educational institutions, DoD laboratories, and industry. This will play a key role in the development of novel energetic materials, validation of predictive numerical models, and the design of propulsion systems that utilize these materials. Ultimately, this will lead to improved control strategies ensuring rapid and stable combustion during critical phases of rocket propulsion.


Gundersen C.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Kreider B.,Iowa State University | Pepper J.,University of Virginia
Journal of Econometrics | Year: 2012

Children in households reporting the receipt of free or reduced-price school meals through the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) are more likely to have negative health outcomes than observationally similar nonparticipants. Assessing causal effects of the program is made difficult, however, by missing counterfactuals and systematic underreporting of program participation. Combining survey data with auxiliary administrative information on the size of the NSLP caseload, we extend nonparametric partial identification methods that account for endogenous selection and nonrandom classification error in a single framework. Similar to a regression discontinuity design, we introduce a new way to conceptualize the monotone instrumental variable (MIV) assumption using eligibility criteria as monotone instruments. Under relatively weak assumptions, we find evidence that the receipt of free and reduced-price lunches improves the health outcomes of children. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Patent
DuPont Pioneer, Iowa State University, University of Missouri, Foundation University and North Carolina State University | Date: 2014-03-12

The present invention comprises methods and compositions for controlling nematode parasitism in host plant. The present invention comprises novel polynucleotides and polypeptides encoded by such polynucleotides comprising one or more nucleic acid sequences disclosed herein having a nucleotide sequence comprising any one of SEQ ID NOs: 1-142, a fragment or variant thereof, or a complement thereof, or a polypeptide sequence comprising any one of SEQ ID NOs: 143-159, a fragment or variant thereof.


Patent
University of Missouri, INC Research, The United States Of America, Iowa State University, Foundation University and North Carolina State University | Date: 2011-07-13

Methods of inhibiting plant parasitic nematodes, methods of obtaining transgenic plants useful for inhibiting such nematodes, and transgenic plants that are resistant to plant parasitic nematodes through inhibition of plant nematode CLE peptide receptor genes are provided. Methods for expressing genes at plant parasitic nematode feeding sites with plant nematode CLE peptide receptor gene promoters are also provided, along with nematode CLE peptide receptor gene promoters that are useful for expressing genes in nematode feeding sites as well as transgenic plants and nematode resistant transgenic plants comprising the promoters.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

Orthopedic Sports Medicine Surgeon Serves Patients in the Newnan and Fayetteville Areas ​​​​OrthoAtlanta is pleased to welcome orthopedic surgeon, David A. Brcka, M.D., to its orthopedic and sports medicine practice, bringing expertise in sports medicine to patients in the Newnan and Fayetteville areas. Board certified, and fellowship trained in sports medicine, Dr. Brcka holds advanced training and a special interest in arthroscopic hip preservation surgery, a minimally-invasive procedure for treating many painful hip conditions, including hip impingement and cartilage tears. Dr. Brcka’s practice includes general orthopedics and sports medicine, providing arthroscopic (minimally-invasive) treatment of a variety of hip, knee and shoulder conditions. Dr. Brcka is also skilled in total knee and partial knee replacement, as well as total and reverse shoulder replacement.  Prior to relocating to Georgia, Dr. Brcka was a partner and attending physician at the Sports Medicine Institute in Clermont, Florida. “Dr. Brcka joins the OrthoAtlanta orthopedic sports medicine group in Newnan and Fayetteville to serve patients with many types of hip, knee and shoulder disorders,” stated Dr. Michael Behr, OrthoAtlanta Medical Director. “While completing his fellowship, Dr. Brcka trained under the direction of Dr. Christopher Larson, M.D., a widely recognized pioneer in hip arthroscopy. Today, Dr. Brcka brings this expertise to OrthoAtlanta to provide arthroscopic hip preservation surgery, and other arthroscopic treatments, to our patients.” Dr. David Brcka graduated from Iowa State University, in Ames, Iowa, with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology. As an undergraduate student at ISU, Dr. Brcka was a member of the Iowa State University football team, and was elected as the first sophomore co-captain in the team’s 100-year history. His love of football and sports led him to his interest in sports medicine and treating sports injuries. Dr. Brcka received his Doctor of Medicine degree at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in Iowa City, Iowa. He completed his Orthopaedic Surgery Residency at Orlando Regional Healthcare in Orlando, Florida, followed by sports medicine fellowship training at Minnesota Orthopedic Sports Medicine Institute in Eden Prairie, MN. Dr. Brcka is a member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Dr. Brcka is an avid cyclist and mountain bike enthusiast. He selected the Atlanta area to make his permanent home in order to partake in the vast cycling challenges available in the nearby north Georgia mountains. Dr. Brcka is also a certified pilot and enjoys recreational flying. Appointments can be scheduled with Dr. David Brcka (pronounced Burch-ka) at OrthoAtlanta locations in Newnan, 770-460-4747 and Fayetteville, 770-460-1900. ​OrthoAtlanta is one of the largest orthopaedic and sports medicine practices in the greater Atlanta, Georgia area. With 38 physicians serving in 12 offices, the physician-owned practice is dedicated to providing the highest level of patient care for injury or deformity of muscles, joints, bones and spine. OrthoAtlanta offers convenient accessibility to a full range of musculoskeletal surgeons, specialists and patient services including on-site physical therapy, pain management care, six MRI imaging centers and workers’ compensation coordination. OrthoAtlanta Surgery Centers in Austell and Fayetteville provide cost-effective, same-day surgical procedures in an accredited outpatient center. Comprehensive operative and non-operative musculoskeletal care and expertise includes sports medicine, arthroscopic surgery, hip replacement, knee replacement, neck and spine surgery, elbow and shoulder surgery, foot and ankle surgery, pain management, arthritis treatment, general orthopedics, work related injuries and acute orthopaedic urgent care.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

Parents are more likely to change their child’s lifestyle if schools offer educational materials alongside body mass index screening results, a new study shows. Some parents in the study received only BMI results, while others had access to the Family Nutrition and Physical Activity screening tool, an online tool designed to help parents evaluate their home environments and practices. “The FNPA assessment can be a good supplement to any school obesity prevention program and it is also useful for clinical evaluations,” says Greg Welk, professor of kinesiology at Iowa State University. “Some clinics are now using it in parent well-child visits so that pediatricians can advise parents about how to help their kids.” Welk says the supplemental information appeared to help parents in the study understand BMI results, as well as identify strategies to take at home, such as offering more fruits and vegetables, limiting screen time, helping their child be more active, and making sure he or she gets enough sleep. The study, published in Childhood Obesity, analyzed nearly 1,500 parental surveys from 31 Pennsylvania elementary schools. As of 2012, 21 states required schools to measure and collect BMI statistics. However, as researchers explained in the paper, a third of these schools did not require parental notification and only one-quarter had a policy regarding referrals. Welk says BMI is useful for school screening because it is quick and non-invasive. However, the statistics are of little use if not shared with parents. “The use of BMI screening on a regular basis can help schools by providing information to help evaluate changes at the school level. It can also directly help individual children and parents to potentially identify growth patterns that may predispose youth to becoming overweight or obese,” Welk says. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the Institute of Medicine have endorsed BMI screening for use in school assessments, but it is important to follow recommended practices for assessment and notification, he adds. Supplemental information such as the FNPA is also recommended since it gives parents information that they can use to help their child. Obesity affects one in six children and teens in the US, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The researchers say their results show there is potential to increase awareness and access to educational tools related to BMI reports. If this information prompts parents to make changes, it could help reduce obesity rates. In the paper, the researchers cited prevalence estimates that indicate more than 17 percent of American youth are obese, but very few parents identify their own children as having weight problems. As few as 2 percent of parents with overweight children and 17 percent of parents with obese children describe their children as overweight. Lisa Bailey-Davis with Geisinger Health System led the work, which was part of a larger study funded by the National Institutes of Health. Welk led the overall project along with former PhD student, Karissa Peyer, now at the University of Tennessee-Chattanooga.


Soukoulis C.M.,Iowa State University | Soukoulis C.M.,Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas | Wegener M.,Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
Nature Photonics | Year: 2011

Photonic metamaterials are man-made structures composed of tailored micro- or nanostructured metallodielectric subwavelength building blocks. This deceptively simple yet powerful concept allows the realization of many new and unusual optical properties, such as magnetism at optical frequencies, negative refractive index, large positive refractive index, zero reflection through impedance matching, perfect absorption, giant circular dichroism and enhanced nonlinear optical properties. Possible applications of metamaterials include ultrahigh-resolution imaging systems, compact polarization optics and cloaking devices. This Review describes recent progress in the fabrication of three-dimensional metamaterial structures and discusses some of the remaining challenges. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has ranked the best colleges and universities with online programs in the state of Iowa for 2017. Of the 17 four-year schools that were ranked, University of Iowa, Iowa State University, Buena Vista University, Saint Ambrose University and University of Northern Iowa came in as the top five institutions. Iowa’s top 14 two-year schools were also included, with Western Iowa Tech Community, Kirkwood Community College, Iowa Lakes Community College, Eastern Iowa Community College and Des Moines Area Community College taking the top five spots. “By 2025, 68 percent of all jobs in Iowa will require postsecondary training or education, according to research from the Iowa College Student Aid Commission,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “The online programs at schools on our list provide the best opportunities for students to meet their educational and career goals.” To earn a spot on the Best Online Schools list, Iowa colleges and universities must be institutionally accredited, public or private not-for-profit entities and have a minimum of one online certificate or degree program. Each college is also scored based on more than a dozen unique data points that include graduation rates, student/teacher ratios, employment services and financial aid availability. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: The Best Online Four-Year Schools in Iowa for 2017 include the following: Allen College Briar Cliff University Buena Vista University Dordt College Graceland University-Lamoni Iowa State University Iowa Wesleyan University Maharishi University of Management Morningside College Mount Mercy University Northwestern College Saint Ambrose University University of Dubuque University of Iowa University of Northern Iowa Upper Iowa University William Penn University Iowa’s Best Online Two-Year Schools for 2017 include the following: Des Moines Area Community College Eastern Iowa Community College District Ellsworth Community College Hawkeye Community College Indian Hills Community College Iowa Central Community College Iowa Lakes Community College Kirkwood Community College Marshalltown Community College Northeast Iowa Community College-Calmar Northwest Iowa Community College Southeastern Community College Southwestern Community College Western Iowa Tech Community College ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


Garrod R.T.,Cornell University | Pauly T.,Iowa State University
Astrophysical Journal | Year: 2011

We investigate the formation and evolution of interstellar dust-grain ices under dark-cloud conditions, with a particular emphasis on CO2. We use a three-phase model (gas/surface/mantle) to simulate the coupled gas-grain chemistry, allowing the distinction of the chemically active surface from the ice layers preserved in the mantle beneath. The model includes a treatment of the competition between barrier-mediated surface reactions and thermal-hopping processes. The results show excellent agreement with the observed behavior of CO2, CO, and water ice in the interstellar medium. The reaction of the OH radical with CO is found to be efficient enough to account for CO 2 ice production in dark clouds. At low visual extinctions, with dust temperatures ≳12K, CO2 is formed by direct diffusion and reaction of CO with OH; we associate the resultant CO2-rich ice with the observational polar CO2 signature. CH4 ice is well correlated with this component. At higher extinctions, with lower dust temperatures, CO is relatively immobile and thus abundant; however, the reaction of H and O atop a CO molecule allows OH and CO to meet rapidly enough to produce a CO:CO2 ratio in the range 2-4, which we associate with apolar signatures. We suggest that the observational apolar CO2/CO ice signatures in dark clouds result from a strongly segregated CO:H 2O ice, in which CO2 resides almost exclusively within the CO component. Observed visual-extinction thresholds for CO2, CO, and H2O are well reproduced by depth-dependent models. Methanol formation is found to be strongly sensitive to dynamical timescales and dust temperatures. © 2011. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved..


Xiao L.,Hunan Normal University | Yeung E.S.,Iowa State University
Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry | Year: 2014

Imaging of plasmonic nanoparticles (PNP) with optical microscopy has aroused considerable attention in recent years. The unique localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) from metal nanoparticles facilitates the transduction of a chemical or physical stimulus into optical signals in a highly efficient way. It is therefore possible to perform chemical or biological assays at the single object level with the help of standard optical microscopes. Because the source of background noise from different samples is different, distinct imaging modalities have been developed to discern the signals of interest in complex surroundings. With these convenient yet powerful techniques, great improvements in chemical and biological assays have been demonstrated, and many interesting phenomena and dynamic processes have also been elucidated. Further development and application of optical imaging methods for plasmonic probes should lead to many exciting results in chemistry and biology in the future. © Copyright ©2014 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Knorowski C.,Iowa State University | Burleigh S.,Louisiana State University | Travesset A.,Iowa State University
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2011

DNA linker mediated self-assembly is emerging as a very general strategy for designing new materials. In this Letter, we characterize both the dynamics and thermodynamics of nanoparticle-DNA self-assembly by molecular dynamics simulations from a new coarse-grained model. We establish the general phase diagram and discuss the stability of a previously overlooked crystalline phase (D-bcc). We also characterize universal properties about the dynamics of crystallization. We point out the connection to f-star polymer systems and discuss the implications for ongoing experiments as well as for the general field of DNA mediated self-assembly. © 2011 American Physical Society.


Fernandez C.,National Engineering School of Caen | Pruski M.,Iowa State University
Topics in Current Chemistry | Year: 2012

Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of quadrupolar nuclei has recently undergone remarkable development of capabilities for obtaining structural and dynamic information at the molecular level. This review summarizes the key achievements attained during the last couple of decades in solid-state NMR of both integer spin and half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei. We provide a concise description of the first- and second-order quadrupolar interactions, and their effect on the static and magic angle spinning (MAS) spectra. Methods are explained for efficient excitation of single- and multiple-quantum coherences, and acquisition of spectra under low- and high-resolution conditions. Most of all, we present a coherent, comparative description of the high-resolution methods for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei, including double rotation (DOR), dynamic angle spinning (DAS), multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS), and satellite transition magic angle spinning (STMAS). Also highlighted are methods for processing and analysis of the spectra. Finally, we review methods for probing the heteronuclear and homonuclear correlations between the quadrupolar nuclei and their quadrupolar or spin-1/2 neighbors. © 2011 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Yoo M.-J.,University of Florida | Wendel J.F.,Iowa State University
PLoS Genetics | Year: 2014

The single-celled cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fiber provides an excellent model to investigate how human selection affects phenotypic evolution. To gain insight into the evolutionary genomics of cotton domestication, we conducted comparative transcriptome profiling of developing cotton fibers using RNA-Seq. Analysis of single-celled fiber transcriptomes from four wild and five domesticated accessions from two developmental time points revealed that at least one-third and likely one-half of the genes in the genome are expressed at any one stage during cotton fiber development. Among these, ~5,000 genes are differentially expressed during primary and secondary cell wall synthesis between wild and domesticated cottons, with a biased distribution among chromosomes. Transcriptome data implicate a number of biological processes affected by human selection, and suggest that the domestication process has prolonged the duration of fiber elongation in modern cultivated forms. Functional analysis suggested that wild cottons allocate greater resources to stress response pathways, while domestication led to reprogrammed resource allocation toward increased fiber growth, possibly through modulating stress-response networks. This first global transcriptomic analysis using multiple accessions of wild and domesticated cottons is an important step toward a more comprehensive systems perspective on cotton fiber evolution. The understanding that human selection over the past 5,000+ years has dramatically re-wired the cotton fiber transcriptome sets the stage for a deeper understanding of the genetic architecture underlying cotton fiber synthesis and phenotypic evolution. © 2014 Wendel, Yoo.


Adams D.C.,Evolution and Organismal Biology | Adams D.C.,Iowa State University
Systematic Biology | Year: 2014

Many questions in evolutionary biology require the quantification and comparison of rates of phenotypic evolution. Recently, phylogenetic comparative methods have been developed for comparing evolutionary rates on a phylogeny for single, univariate traits (σ2), and evolutionary rate matrices (R) for sets of traits treated simultaneously. However, high-dimensional traits like shape remain under-examined with this framework, because methods suited for such data have not been fully developed. In this article, I describe a method to quantify phylogenetic evolutionary rates for high-dimensional multivariate data, found from the equivalency between statistical methods based on covariance matrices and those based on distance matrices (R-mode and Q-mode methods). I then use simulations to evaluate the statistical performance of hypothesis-testing procedures that compare for two or more groups of species on a phylogeny. Under both isotropic and non-isotropic conditions, and for differing numbers of trait dimensions, the proposed method displays appropriate Type I error and high statistical power for detecting known differences in among groups. In contrast, the Type I error rate of likelihood tests based on the evolutionary rate matrix (R) increases as the number of trait dimensions (p) increases, and becomes unacceptably large when only a few trait dimensions are considered. Further, likelihood tests based on R cannot be computed when the number of trait dimensions equals or exceeds the number of taxa in the phylogeny (i.e., when p ≥ N). These results demonstrate that tests based on provide a useful means of comparing evolutionary rates for high-dimensional data that are otherwise not analytically accessible to methods based on the evolutionary rate matrix. This advance thus expands the phylogenetic comparative toolkit for high-dimensional phenotypic traits like shape. Finally, I illustrate the utility of the new approach by evaluating rates of head shape evolution in a lineage of Plethodon salamanders. © 2013 The Author(s).


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2016

The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Technology Transfer Phase I project is the accelerated utilization of crop materials for the manufacture of biobased aromatic chemicals such as terephthalic acid and benzoic acid, which currently have global market value of $60 billion and $200 million, respectfully. This project focusses on benzoic acid (applications ranging from food additives to plasticizers) as the first commercial target to gain a market foothold and develop this technology. This technology will provide a biobased source for benzoic acid, which is currently produced almost exclusively from the oxidation of petrochemical toluene. Situated in Iowa, the epicenter of biomass production in the United States, SusTerea Biorenewables LLC can impact the rural economy, expand the utilization of crop materials beyond ethanol into the production of biobased chemicals. The technical objectives in this Phase I research project is development of the biobased coumalic acid platform, for producing an array of industrially important aromatic molecules. The technological basis for the project began with the identification by researcehers at the NSF Engineering Research Center, Center for Biorenewable Chemicals (CBiRC) of a chemical catalysis pathway to transform an industrially optimized fermentation product (malic acid) into coumalic acid and the discovery that coumalic acid could be used to produce an array of aromatics such as benzoic acid, terephthalic acid, and dimethyl terephthalate. Thus, coumalic acid has the potential to become a platform chemical opportunity in the burgeoning biorenewable chemical industry. First, the reaction conditions including temperature, pressure and solvent using an industrially relevant bench scale continuous flow reactor will be optimized. Second, new catalysts to substitute noble metals will be explored for the key aromatization step. Third, this experimental data will be used to construct a preliminary process design and a techno- economic model towards developing a scalable production technology.


MOU with US National Lab Follows Canadian Government Grant Supporting Amy's EV Battery Recycling Work VANCOUVER, BC / ACCESSWIRE / March 2, 2017 / Larry W. Reaugh, President and Chief Executive Officer of American Manganese Inc. ("American Manganese" or "AMI" or the "Company") (TSX-V: AMY; OTC PINK: AMYZF; Frankfurt: 2AM), is pleased to announce that the Company has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding ("MOU") with Ames Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratory, operated by Iowa State University. Ames is the lead national laboratory for the Critical Materials Institute, a U.S. Department of Energy Innovation hub established by Congress in 2013. The Agreement allows both parties to share an interest in collaborating in the area of materials science to synergistically augment the scope and expertise of each organization and to enhance the technological development of both organizations; Both parties recognize that the recovery and reclamation of metals and minerals from spent lithium-ion batteries represents a significant source of critical materials; and Both parties share an interest in collaborating in the exploration of electric vehicle (EV) battery materials recycling options from spent electric vehicle lithium ion batteries having cathode chemistries such as: Lithium-Cobalt, Lithium-Cobalt-Nickel-Manganese, and Lithium-Manganese. The MOU with the U.S. Government's Ames Lab follows last month's award to American Manganese from the Canadian Government's National Research Council of Canada Industrial Research Assistance Program (NRC-IRAP) for the continued development of the Company's spent electric vehicle battery cathode materials recycling technology. Ames Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science national laboratory operated by Iowa State University. Ames Laboratory creates innovative materials, technologies, and energy solutions using its expertise, unique capabilities, and interdisciplinary collaborations to solve global problems. The Critical Materials Institute is a Department of Energy Innovation Hub led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory. CMI seeks ways to eliminate and reduce reliance on rare-earth metals and other materials critical to the success of clean energy technologies. American Manganese Inc. is a diversified specialty and critical metal company focused on capitalizing on its patented intellectual property through low cost production or recovery of electrolytic manganese products throughout the world, and recycling of spent electric vehicle lithium ion rechargeable batteries. Interest in the Company's patented process has adjusted the focus of American Manganese Inc. toward the examination of applying its patented technology for other purposes and materials. American Manganese Inc. aims to capitalize on its patented technology and proprietary know-how to become an industry leader in the recycling of spent electric vehicle lithium ion batteries having cathode chemistries, such as: Lithium-Cobalt, Lithium-Cobalt-Nickel-Manganese, Lithium-Cobalt-Aluminum, and Lithium-Manganese (Please see the Company's January 19, 2016 press release for further details). On behalf of Management AMERICAN MANGANESE INC. Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release. This news release may contain "forward-looking statements," which are statements about the future based on current expectations or beliefs. For this purpose, statements of historical fact may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements by their nature involve risks and uncertainties, and there can be no assurance that such statements will prove to be accurate or true. Investors should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. The Company does not undertake any obligation to update forward-looking statements except as required by law.


The Agreement allows both parties to share an interest in collaborating in the area of materials science to synergistically augment the scope and expertise of each organization and to enhance the technological development of both organizations; Both parties recognize that the recovery and reclamation of metals and minerals from spent lithium-ion batteries represents a significant source of critical materials; and Both parties share an interest in collaborating in the exploration of electric vehicle (EV) battery materials recycling options from spent electric vehicle lithium ion batteries having cathode chemistries such as: Lithium-Cobalt, Lithium-Cobalt-Nickel-Manganese, and Lithium-Manganese. The MOU with the U.S. Government's Ames Lab follows last month's award to American Manganese from the Canadian Government's National Research Council of Canada Industrial Research Assistance Program (NRC-IRAP) for the continued development of the Company's spent electric vehicle battery cathode materials recycling technology. Ames Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science national laboratory operated by Iowa State University. Ames Laboratory creates innovative materials, technologies, and energy solutions using its expertise, unique capabilities, and interdisciplinary collaborations to solve global problems. The Critical Materials Institute is a Department of Energy Innovation Hub led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory. CMI seeks ways to eliminate and reduce reliance on rare-earth metals and other materials critical to the success of clean energy technologies. American Manganese Inc. is a diversified specialty and critical metal company focused on capitalizing on its patented intellectual property through low cost production or recovery of electrolytic manganese products throughout the world, and recycling of spent electric vehicle lithium ion rechargeable batteries. Interest in the Company's patented process has adjusted the focus of American Manganese Inc. toward the examination of applying its patented technology for other purposes and materials. American Manganese Inc. aims to capitalize on its patented technology and proprietary know-how to become an industry leader in the recycling of spent electric vehicle lithium ion batteries having cathode chemistries, such as: Lithium-Cobalt, Lithium-Cobalt-Nickel-Manganese, Lithium-Cobalt-Aluminum, and Lithium-Manganese (Please see the Company's January 19, 2016 press release for further details). On behalf of Management AMERICAN MANGANESE INC. Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release. This news release may contain "forward-looking statements," which are statements about the future based on current expectations or beliefs. For this purpose, statements of historical fact may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements by their nature involve risks and uncertainties, and there can be no assurance that such statements will prove to be accurate or true. Investors should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. The Company does not undertake any obligation to update forward-looking statements except as required by law.

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