Moscow, ID, United States
Moscow, ID, United States

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Hatten T.D.,Invertebrate Ecology Inc. | Biggam R.,Invertebrate Ecology Inc. | Jorgensen J.,Yakama Nation | Anders P.,Cramer Fish science
Western North American Naturalist | Year: 2013

The recently described Oreoleptis torrenticola Zloty, Sinclair and Pritchard (Diptera: Tabanomorpha), belonging to the monotypic family Oreoleptidae, was previously described from the Northern Rocky Mountains of the USA and Canada. However, as part of a broad, multidisciplinary study by the Yakama Nation, 30 larvae of O. torrenticola were collected at multiple sites within the Twisp River of the Cascade Mountains in Okanogan County, Washington, 2008-2010. This finding represents a substantial range extension for the species.


Hatten T.D.,Invertebrate Ecology Inc. | Merz N.,Kootenai Tribe of Idaho | Johnson J.B.,University of Idaho | Looney C.,University of Idaho | And 7 more authors.
Western North American Naturalist | Year: 2011

The parasitic wasp Mymaromella pala Huber and Gibson (Hymenoptera: Mymarommatidae) was collected at 4 sites within a canyon reach of the Kootenai River in Lincoln County, Montana. This minute species has only recently been described, but it appears to have a large distribution throughout the United States and to be associated with upland and riparian forests. © 2010.


Saska P.,Czech Republic Crop Research Institute | van der Werf W.,Wageningen University | Hemerik L.,Wageningen University | Luff M.L.,Northumbria University | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Applied Ecology | Year: 2013

Carabids and other epigeal arthropods make important contributions to biodiversity, food webs and biocontrol of invertebrate pests and weeds. Pitfall trapping is widely used for sampling carabid populations, but this technique yields biased estimates of abundance ('activity-density') because individual activity - which is affected by climatic factors - affects the rate of catch. To date, the impact of temperature on pitfall catches, while suspected to be large, has not been quantified, and no method is available to account for it. This lack of knowledge and the unavailability of a method for bias correction affect the confidence that can be placed on results of ecological field studies based on pitfall data. Here, we develop a simple model for the effect of temperature, assuming a constant proportional change in the rate of catch per °C change in temperature, r, consistent with an exponential Q10 response to temperature. We fit this model to 38 time series of pitfall catches and accompanying temperature records from the literature, using first differences and other detrending methods to account for seasonality. We use meta-analysis to assess consistency of the estimated parameter r among studies. The mean rate of increase in total catch across data sets was 0·0863 ± 0·0058 per °C of maximum temperature and 0·0497 ± 0·0107 per °C of minimum temperature. Multiple regression analyses of 19 data sets showed that temperature is the key climatic variable affecting total catch. Relationships between temperature and catch were also identified at species level. Correction for temperature bias had substantial effects on seasonal trends of carabid catches. Synthesis and Applications. The effect of temperature on pitfall catches is shown here to be substantial and worthy of consideration when interpreting results of pitfall trapping. The exponential model can be used both for effect estimation and for bias correction of observed data. Correcting for temperature-related trapping bias is straightforward and enables population estimates to be more comparable. It may thus improve data interpretation in ecological, conservation and monitoring studies, and assist in better management and conservation of habitats and ecosystem services. Nevertheless, field ecologists should remain vigilant for other sources of bias. The effect of temperature on pitfall catches is shown here to be substantial and worthy of consideration when interpreting results of pitfall trapping. The exponential model can be used both for effect estimation and for bias correction of observed data. Correcting for temperature-related trapping bias is straightforward and enables population estimates to be more comparable. It may thus improve data interpretation in ecological, conservation and monitoring studies, and assist in better management and conservation of habitats and ecosystem services. Nevertheless, field ecologists should remain vigilant for other sources of bias. © 2012 British Ecological Society.


Hatten T.D.,University of Idaho | Hatten T.D.,Invertebrate Ecology Inc. | Dahlquist R.M.,Fresno Pacific University | Eigenbrode S.D.,University of Idaho | Bosque-Perez N.A.,University of Idaho
Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata | Year: 2010

Conversion from conventional-tillage (CT) to no-tillage (NT) agriculture can affect pests and beneficial organisms in various ways. NT has been shown to reduce the relative abundance and feeding damage of pea leaf weevil (PLW), Sitona lineatus L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in spring pea, especially during the early-season colonization period in the Palouse region of northwest Idaho. Pitfall traps were used to quantify tillage effects on activity-density of PLW in field experiments conducted during 2001 and 2002. As capture rate of pitfall traps for PLW might be influenced by effects of tillage treatment, two mark-recapture studies were employed to compare trapping rates in NT and CT spring pea during 2003. Also in 2003, direct sampling was used to estimate PLW densities during the colonization period, and to assess PLW feeding damage on pea. PLW activity-density was significantly lower in NT relative to CT during the early colonization period (May) of 2001 and 2002, and during the late colonization period (June) of 2002. Activity-density was not different between treatments during the early emergence (July) or late emergence (August) periods in either year of the study. Trap capture rates did not differ between tillage systems in the mark-recapture studies, suggesting that pitfall trapping provided unbiased estimates of PLW relative abundances. PLW absolute densities and feeding damage were significantly lower in NT than in CT. These results indicate that NT provides a pest suppression benefit in spring pea. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The Netherlands Entomological Society.


Hatten T.D.,Invertebrate Ecology Inc. | Strange J.P.,Utah State University | Maxwell J.M.,Invertebrate Ecology Inc.
Western North American Naturalist | Year: 2015

Bumble bees are important pollinators of flowering plants, foraging and providing pollination services throughout the growing season. They are adapted to cool temperatures and are among the most important of all pollinators at high elevations and northern latitudes. Over the past several decades, multiple species of bumble bees have experienced declines in both geographic range and abundance in Europe and North America, while 4 species of the genus Bombus (Bombus) have suffered dramatic declines in the United States. Such declines are not as evident in Alaska, and the status of Bombus remains relatively unknown in the adjacent territories of Canada. To begin addressing this knowledge gap, we sampled the bumble bee fauna foraging on floral patches along 5 highways of Canada and southeastern Alaska in a short-term, one-time survey during late summer 2010. We observed 14 species and found Bombus assemblages to be structured by broad geographic features and ecoregions. The Bombus species B. (B.) occidentalis and B. (B.) terricola were relatively abundant in sample sites west and east of the Rocky Mountains, respectively, and B. (Pyrobombus) vagans, B. (Cullumanobombus) rufocinctus, and B. occidentalis were the most abundant species across all sites. © 2015 Western North American Naturalist.


Hatten T.D.,Invertebrate Ecology Inc. | Looney C.,111 Washington St. SE | Strange J.P.,Utah State University | Bosque-Perez N.A.,University of Idaho
Journal of Insect Science | Year: 2013

Bumble bees, Bombus Latreille (Hymenoptera: Apidae:), are dominant pollinators in the northern hemisphere, providing important pollination services for commercial crops and innumerable wild plants. Nationwide declines in several bumble bee species and habitat losses in multiple ecosystems have raised concerns about conservation of this important group. In many regions, such as the Palouse Prairie, relatively little is known about bumble bee communities, despite their critical ecosystem functions. Pitfall trap surveys for ground beetles in Palouse prairie remnants conducted in 2002-2003 contained considerable by-catch of bumble bees. The effects of landscape context, remnant features, year, and season on bumble bee community composition were examined. Additionally, bees captured in 2002-2003 were compared with historic records for the region to assess changes in the presence of individual species. Ten species of bumble bee were captured, representing the majority of the species historically known from the region. Few detectable differences in bumble bee abundances were found among remnants. Community composition differed appreciably, however, based on season, landscape context, and elevation, resulting in different bee assemblages between western, low-lying remnants and eastern, higherelevation remnants. The results suggest that conservation of the still species-rich bumble bee fauna should take into account variability among prairie remnants, and further work is required to adequately explain bumble bee habitat associations on the Palouse.

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