Non Invasive Cardiology Unit

Ashqelon, Israel

Non Invasive Cardiology Unit

Ashqelon, Israel
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Blondheim D.S.,Non invasive Cardiology Unit | Friedman Z.,General Electric | Lysyansky P.,General Electric | Kuperstein R.,Non invasive Cardiology Unit | And 14 more authors.
European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging | Year: 2012

Aims: Assessing the quality ofwallmotion(WM) on echocardiograms remains a challenge. Previously,we validated an automated application used by experienced echocardiographers for WM classification based on longitudinal two-dimensional (2D) strain. The aim of this studywas to showthat the use of this automatic applicationwas independent of the user's experience. Methods and results: We compared the WM classifications obtained by the application when used by 12 highly experienced readers (Exp-R) vs. 11 inexperienced readers (InExp-R). Both classifications were compared with expert consensus classifications using the standard visual method. Digitized clips of cardiac cycles from three apical views in 105 patients were used for these analyses. Reproducibility of both groups was high (overall intra-class correlation coefficient: InExp-R = 0.89, Exp-R = 0.83); the lowest was noted for hypokinetic segments (InExp-R = 0.79, Exp-R = 0.72). InExp-R scores were concordant with Exp-R mode scores in 88.8% of segments; they were overestimated in 5.8% and underestimated in 3.2%. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of InExp-R vs. Exp-R for classifying segments as normal/abnormal were identical (87, 85, and 86%, respectively). Conclusion: Classification of WM from apical views with an automatic application based on longitudinal 2D strain by InExp-R vs. Exp-R was similar to visual classification by Exp-R. This application may be useful for inexperienced echocardiographers/ technicians and may serve as an automated 'second opinion' for experienced echocardiographers. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2011.


Gabbay U.,Tel Aviv University | Yosefy C.,Non Invasive Cardiology Unit | Yosefy C.,Ben - Gurion University of the Negev
International Journal of Cardiology | Year: 2010

Background: The underlying causes of chordae tendinae rupture (CTR) and their frequencies vary. Different publications reached conflicting conclusions due to diverse definitions, different detection measures, and morbidity trends over time. Methods: Systematic literature review of unselected CTR series and underlying cause frequencies reanalysis. Results: Primary CTR overall rates before and since 1985 remain considerable (52.5% vs. 51.2%), yet median decreased (35% and 14%). Sub-acute endocarditis (SBE) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) were the most frequent causes before 1985 (54.4% and 42.1%, respectively); since 1985 SBE and RHD have dropped sharply to 37.4% and 24.8%, respectively. Since 1985, mitral valve prolapse (MVP) and myxomatous degeneration (MD) have caused 44.5% and 11.7%, respectively. All other causes were almost not evident. Conclusions: "Primary CTR" remains significant. MD may be underestimated, as microscopic evaluation was not routinely performed. MD is probably the most frequent underlying cause given it is also the underlying cause of MVP. MVP may be overestimated due to detection criteria and misinterpretation of leaflet prolapse. SBE, frequently coexistent with other underlying causes, may be overestimated either due to detection bias or being a consequence rather than CTR cause. RHD is expected to further decline, following rheumatic fever. Previous significant underlying causes proved to be episodic if at all causative, e.g., blunt chest trauma, generalized connective tissue disorder, ischemic heart disease, and other heart and valvular diseases. CTR can occur in apparently healthy subjects having no atypical appearance and who may be unaware of carrying risk. © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Ben Zekry S.,Non Invasive Cardiology Unit | Ben Zekry S.,Tel Aviv University | Spiegelstein D.,Leviev Heart Center | Spiegelstein D.,Tel Aviv University | And 10 more authors.
Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery | Year: 2015

Objective Mitral valve repair for myxomatous Barlow disease is a challenging procedure requiring complex surgery with less than optimal results. The use of ring-only repair has been previously reported but never analyzed or followed-up. We investigated this simple valve repair approach for patients with Barlow disease and multisegment involvement causing mainly central jet. Methods Of 572 patients who underwent mitral valve repair for mitral regurgitation at our medical center, 24 with Barlow disease (aged 47 ± 14 years; 46% male) underwent ring-only repair. Patients were characterized by severely enlarged mitral valve annulus, multisegment prolapse involving both leaflets, and demonstrated mainly a central wide regurgitant jet. Surgical technique included only the implantation of a large mitral annuloplasty ring. Early and late outcome results were compared with those of the remaining patients who underwent conventional mitral valve repair for degenerative disease (controls). Results All ring-only patients presented with moderate-severe/severe mitral regurgitation (vena contracta, 0.6 ± 0.1 cm; regurgitation volume, 52 ± 17 mL), with mainly a central jet and almost preserved ejection fraction (59% ± 6%). Cardiopulmonary bypass and crossclamp times were significantly shorter compared with controls (P <.0001). At follow-up (ring-only, 38 ± 36 months and controls, 36 ± 29 months), there were no late deaths in the ring-only group compared with 19 (4%) in the controls. Late follow-up revealed New York Heart Association functional class I or II in 95% of ring-only patients, compared with 90% of controls. Freedom from recurrent moderate or severe mitral regurgitation was 100% and 89% in the ring-only and control groups, respectively. Conclusions Mitral annuloplasty for Barlow disease patients with multisegment involvement and mainly central regurgitant jet is both simple and reproducible with excellent late outcomes. © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery.


Assessing the quality of wall motion (WM) on echocardiograms remains a challenge. Previously, we validated an automated application used by experienced echocardiographers for WM classification based on longitudinal two-dimensional (2D) strain. The aim of this study was to show that the use of this automatic application was independent of the users experience.We compared the WM classifications obtained by the application when used by 12 highly experienced readers (Exp-R) vs. 11 inexperienced readers (InExp-R). Both classifications were compared with expert consensus classifications using the standard visual method. Digitized clips of cardiac cycles from three apical views in 105 patients were used for these analyses. Reproducibility of both groups was high (overall intra-class correlation coefficient: InExp-R = 0.89, Exp-R = 0.83); the lowest was noted for hypokinetic segments (InExp-R = 0.79, Exp-R = 0.72). InExp-R scores were concordant with Exp-R mode scores in 88.8% of segments; they were overestimated in 5.8% and underestimated in 3.2%. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of InExp-R vs. Exp-R for classifying segments as normal/abnormal were identical (87, 85, and 86%, respectively).Classification of WM from apical views with an automatic application based on longitudinal 2D strain by InExp-R vs. Exp-R was similar to visual classification by Exp-R. This application may be useful for inexperienced echocardiographers/technicians and may serve as an automated second opinion for experienced echocardiographers.

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