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Wang H.,Intrusion | Wang H.,Dalian Ocean University
Proceedings - 2011 7th International Conference on Mobile Ad-hoc and Sensor Networks, MSN 2011 | Year: 2011

In order to improve the security of ring signature, we combine standard ring signature and key-insulated cryptography. We give the definition and security model for ID-based key-insulated ring signature, and at the same time we proposed an ID-based strong key-insulated ring signature scheme. This scheme can deal with key-exposure problem. The proposed ring signature scheme enjoys several attractive features: (1)it is provably secure in standard model, (2)it is unconditional anonymous, (3)it is strong key-insulated, (4)it allows frequent key-updates without increasing the risk of helper key-exposure, and thus enhances the security of the system. © 2011 IEEE.


Wang H.,Dalian Ocean University | Zhang Y.,Intrusion
IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing | Year: 2012

In 2011, Sun et al. [5] proposed a security architecture to ensure unconditional anonymity for honest users and traceability of misbehaving users for network authorities in wireless mesh networks (WMNs). It strives to resolve the conflicts between the anonymity and traceability objectives. In this paper, we attacked Sun et al. scheme's traceability. Our analysis showed that trusted authority (TA) cannot trace the misbehavior client (CL) even if it double-time deposits the same ticket. © 2006 IEEE.


Rohani M.F.,Intrusion
World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology | Year: 2011

Duplicated region detection is a technical method to expose copy-paste forgeries on digital images. Copy-paste is one of the common types of forgeries to clone portion of an image in order to conceal or duplicate special object. In this type of forgery detection, extracting robust block feature and also high time complexity of matching step are two main open problems. This paper concentrates on computational time and proposes a local block matching algorithm based on block clustering to enhance time complexity. Time complexity of the proposed algorithm is formulated and effects of two parameter, block size and number of cluster, on efficiency of this algorithm are considered. The experimental results and mathematical analysis demonstrate this algorithm is more costeffective than lexicographically algorithms in time complexity issue when the image is complex.


Patent
Intrusion | Date: 2010-02-19

The present invention describes a system and method of extracting and storing data elements from network packets, thus performing the task of data mining. In one embodiment of the present invention incoming packets are decomposed one protocol layer at a time to extract data elements contained in the protocol headers. Layer-specific parsers perform deep packet inspection in order to extract data elements from upper-level protocols. Extracted data is arranged in rows, which are subsequently stored into a memory-based accumulator. After some length of time the accumulator is flushed to disk files. Another process reads the flushed disk files row-by-row, inserting each row into a relational database. Standard SQL operations are performed on the relational database in order to generate and display reports of the collected data.


Patent
Intrusion | Date: 2010-03-02

A system and method of recording packets and packet streams to random-access block-oriented recording media, and retrieving the packets and packet streams from said recording media is disclosed. Incoming packets are copied into very large fixed sized blocks, which in turn are distributed to a plurality of disk drives for recording. Supplementary blocks of index data constructed as packets are received and recorded. The index data reduces the time required to locate and read specific packets and packet streams from the recording media. Recorded packets are retrieved and converted to standard pcap format files.


News Article | November 14, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

RICHARDSON, Texas, Nov. 14, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Intrusion Inc. (OTCQB:INTZ), (“Intrusion”) announced today financial results for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2016. Intrusion’s net loss was $280 thousand in the third quarter 2016 compared to a net loss of $432 thousand in the third quarter 2015. Intrusion’s revenue for the third quarter 2016 was $1.6 million compared to $1.6 million in the third quarter 2015. Gross profit was $1.0 million or 62 percent of revenue in the third quarter of 2016 compared to $1.0 million or 63 percent of revenue in the third quarter 2015. Intrusion’s third quarter 2016 operating expenses were $1.2 million compared to $1.4 million in the third quarter 2015. As of September 30, 2016, Intrusion reported cash and cash equivalents of $0.2 million, a working capital deficiency of $1.0 million and debt of $2.5 million. “Orders booked in the third quarter 2016 were $1.2 million.  An order for $1.0 million was delayed in our customer’s purchasing department; however, $625,000 of the delayed order has been booked in October with the balance expected in November,” stated G. Ward Paxton, President and CEO of Intrusion. Intrusion’s management will host its regularly scheduled quarterly conference call to discuss the Company’s financial and operational progress at 4:00 P.M., CST today.  Interested investors can access the call at 1-877-258-4925 (if outside the United States, 1-973-500-2152).  For those unable to participate in the live conference call, a replay will be accessible beginning today at 7:00 P.M., CST until November 21, 2016 by calling 1-855-859-2056 (if outside the United States, 1-404-537-3406).  At the replay prompt, enter conference identification number 18411485.  Additionally, a live and archived audio webcast of the conference call will be available at www.intrusion.com. Intrusion Inc. is a global provider of entity identification, high speed data mining, cybercrime and advanced persistent threat detection products.  Intrusion’s product families include TraceCop™ for identity discovery and disclosure, and Savant™ for network data mining and advanced persistent threat detection.  Intrusion’s products help protect critical information assets by quickly detecting, protecting, analyzing and reporting attacks or misuse of classified, private and regulated information for government and enterprise networks.  For more information, please visit www.intrusion.com. This release may contain certain forward-looking statements, which reflect management's expectations regarding future events and operating performance and speak only as of the date hereof. These forward-looking statements involve a number of risks and uncertainties.  Such statements include, without limitations, statements regarding future revenue growth and profitability, forecasted future sales opportunities with potential new customers, the difficulties in forecasting future sales caused by current economic and market conditions, the effects of sales and implementation cycles for our products on our quarterly results and difficulties in accurately estimating market growth, the effect of military actions on government and corporate spending on information security products, spending patterns of, and appropriations to, U.S. government departments, as well as other statements.  These statements are made under the "safe harbor" provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and involve risks and uncertainties which could cause actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements.  The factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from expectations are detailed in the Company's most recent reports on Form 10-K and Form 10-Q, particularly under the heading “Risk Factors.”


News Article | August 18, 2015
Site: www.infoworld.com

This post marks my 10th year writing for InfoWorld magazine. I became a regular writer for InfoWorld by being, shall we say, persistent -- I wasn't a big fan of InfoWorld's security coverage at the time and suggested I could do better. Eventually, InfoWorld's editors agreed, and I've been posting here ever since. Frequent readers of my blog know that I spend a lot of time complaining about the state of computer security and how little the things have changed. Now, however, is a great time to reflect on what has changed. It's been a wild ride. Certainly the threats we now face are different, but so too are the defenses. When I first started in in this business, almost all threats were malware programs (viruses, worms, and Trojans) written by adolescent male pranksters. Although some malware programs did real harm, such as formatting disks or erasing data files, most simply annoyed people. You had some professional and even state-sponsored hackers, but they weren't the norm. Now almost all malware is created to steal money or corporate secrets. The script kiddies are almost gone, pushed out by the professional hacker gangs that make millions of dollars each day victimizing home users and corporations with almost no threat of being caught or prosecuted. Malware has gone from innocuous, funny viruses and worms to identity-stealing programs and ransomware. Anyone with a credit card is accustomed to having their financial identity compromised. When 100 million records are compromised, no one bats an eye anymore. Doesn't everyone have free credit monitoring now? Advanced persistent threats (APTs), officially or unofficially working on the behalf of a foreign government, are the new normal. They steal private documents and emails, along with patents and contracts, as easily as child would pluck flowers in a vast golden field. Countries now routinely use their offensive cyber security capabilities to read the email of another country's leader -- or to destroy physical assets (such as nuclear centrifuges). Which country has the best hackers will determine the victors in the new cold war. I miss the days of harmless boot viruses and teenage script kiddies. Today, everyone has been hacked. This is no exaggeration. Every company worth hacking is hacked or could easily be hacked. This has created a new defensive strategic paradigm called "assume breach," where we acknowledge that there's no way we can eliminate persistent threats. In truth, it has always been this way. We've never been good at keeping the bad guys out. All that has changed is that we're admitting it to ourselves. When you assume there has been a breach, that changes your defensive strategy. Once antivirus scanners were our main tool for breach detection. Now, an entire new slew of companies and products have been developed to detect when somebody's doing something malicious, even if that something malicious is being done by a "legitimate" user. Event monitoring systems are improving. Many companies are now storing and analyzing billions of events a day, using huge disk storage arrays that a short time ago would have stored the world's entire collection of digital content. Intrusion detection has moved beyond detecting simple malicious activity to detecting anomalous events that are out of character for a company and its employees. Connections to known, questionable networks are tracked and reported like the antivirus detections of yesteryear. Data leak protection (DLP) has become big business. A decade ago, companies became practiced at shutting down their email servers and networks when the latest file attachment worm proliferated on the network. Today's defenders are creating hardened administrative computers and isolated management environments that can be used to manage their networks when a breach is detected. Although there are notable exceptions (such as Sony Pictures), computer infrastructure and the Internet have become so integral to business today, rarely is a whole company taken offline in response to even the biggest threats. Today's defenders have to fix the hemorrhage without killing the patient. When I first started in computer security, only the government or top secret research facilities forced employees to use smartcards or other multifactor authentication tools. Now I see this at nearly every company I visit. Plus, most companies have great physical security, starting at the visitor's desk and parking lot -- and computer rooms are behind locked doors with the servers in locked cages. Everyone still has lots of passwords, but most businesses and the most popular social media sites now offer two-factor authentication. Mobile phones and popular operating systems come with biometric identification by default. Eventually, passwords alone will stop being used altogether, receding into history like paper checks or credit cards without your picture and a chip. I don't think multifactor authentication will solve all our problems, but it makes it harder for cyber crooks to steal and use your identity. Look for phishing emails and websites to disappear completely. We're headed there now. Default encryption is on the rise despite nearly all governments protesting it. Today, most popular operating systems, computers, and mobile devices come with built-in, default-enabled disk encryption. More and more websites are using SSL (really TLS) encryption by default. Police and government agencies are trying to scare us into getting rid of default encryption or enabling backdoors in the name of stopping child molesters and other criminals. Most people aren't buying it. Default encryption will mean that when a computing device is stolen, no longer will it turn into a data compromise that must be reported to the authorities (and the media). The bad guys and unauthorized parties will be listening into our private conversations and transactions much less. The key question to be answered over the long run: What if the authorities are right? Will badness shielded by default encryption overwhelm all the privacy goodness? I don't think so. The really bad guys already have access to and often use strong encryption, and in most cases the authorities still find them and lock them up. The only difference is that people who use encryption for legitimate privacy reasons will also get the protection. Unfortunately, all these defense improvements haven't yet translated into a safer computing environment. There are far more malicious attacks today than there were 10 years ago. "Improvements" in cyber crime have so far completely overwhelmed the advances in cyber security defense. But I thoroughly believe that the defenses will catch up and eventually make the Internet a much safer place. It's the natural progression of every civilized society, with the same bumps along the way. For a while things get worse, but society responds, and the world advances for the better. The only question I have: When will it happen? If I'm lucky enough to be writing for InfoWorld 10 years from now, will I be writing more about the successes or the failures? What's your opinion?


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

RICHARDSON, Texas, Feb. 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Intrusion Inc. (OTCQB:INTZ), (“Intrusion”) will announce fourth quarter 2016 financial results on Tuesday, February 21, 2017.  The press release will be published over the wire services after the market closes.  The release will also be available on the company’s web site at www.intrusion.com.  Intrusion management will review the Company’s financial and operational progress for the fourth quarter 2016 during a conference call later that day at 4:00 P.M., CST. Interested investors can access the call at 1-877-258-4925 at 4:00 P.M., CST.  For those unable to participate in the live conference call, a replay will be accessible beginning February 21, 2017 at approximately 7:00 P.M., CST until February 28, 2017 by calling 1-855-859-2056 or 1-404-537-3406.  At the replay prompt, enter conference identification number 72178892.  In addition, a live and archived audio webcast of the conference call will be available at www.intrusion.com. Intrusion Inc. is a global provider of entity identification, high speed data mining, cybercrime and advanced persistent threat detection products.  Intrusion’s product families include TraceCop™ for identity discovery and disclosure, and Savant™ for network data mining and advanced persistent threat detection.  Intrusion’s products help protect critical information assets by quickly detecting, protecting, analyzing and reporting attacks or misuse of classified, private and regulated information for government and enterprise networks.  For more information, please visit www.intrusion.com.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

RICHARDSON, Texas, Feb. 21, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Intrusion Inc. (OTCQB:INTZ), (“Intrusion”) today announced financial results for the quarter and year ended December 31, 2016. Intrusion’s net loss for the fourth quarter 2016 was $0.3 million, compared to a net loss of $0.5 million for the fourth quarter 2015.  Net loss for the year 2016 was $1.6 million, compared to a net loss of $1.2 million for 2015. Revenue for the fourth quarter 2016 was $1.4 million, compared to $1.5 million in the fourth quarter 2015.  Revenue for the year 2016 was $6.1 million, compared to $6.8 million in 2015. Gross profit margin increased to 65% of revenue in the fourth quarter of 2016, compared to 63% of revenue in the fourth quarter 2015.  For the year, the gross profit margin increased to 64%, compared to 63% in 2015. Intrusion’s fourth quarter 2016 operating expenses were $1.2 million, compared to $1.4 million in the fourth quarter 2015. For the year 2016, operating expenses were $5.3 million, compared to $5.4 million in 2015. As of December 31, 2016, Intrusion reported cash and cash equivalents of $0.1 million, a working capital deficiency of $0.8 million, and debt of $3.1 million.   As of December 31, 2015, Intrusion reported cash and cash equivalents of $0.1 million, working capital deficiency of $0.8 million and debt of $1.9 million. “We booked $1.3 million of orders in the fourth quarter 2016,” stated G. Ward Paxton, Chairman, President and CEO of Intrusion.  “Federal Government business in the fourth quarter was reduced due to the approval delay of the 2017 Federal Budget.  The government is operating under a Continued Resolution whereby existing projects can be funded up to the level of the previous year and new projects are delayed until the budget is approved.  Since Intrusion has heavy focus on new projects, these delays have impacted us significantly.  On the other hand, the number of new projects in our pipeline has grown.  In spite of the Continued Resolution problem with the Federal Government business, we booked $0.8 million of orders in January 2017,” Paxton concluded. Intrusion’s management will host its regularly scheduled quarterly conference call to discuss the Company’s financial and operational progress at 4:00 P.M., CST today.  Interested investors can access the call at 1-877-258-4925.  For those unable to participate in the live conference call, a replay will be accessible beginning today at 7:00 P.M., CST until February 28, 2017 by calling 1-855-859-2056 or 1-404-537-3406.  At the replay prompt, enter conference identification number 72178892. Additionally, a live and archived audio webcast of the conference call will be available at www.intrusion.com. Intrusion Inc. is a global provider of entity identification, high speed data mining, cybercrime and advanced persistent threat detection products.  Intrusion’s product families include TraceCop™ for identity discovery and disclosure, and Savant™ for network data mining and advanced persistent threat detection.  Intrusion’s products help protect critical information assets by quickly detecting, protecting, analyzing and reporting attacks or misuse of classified, private and regulated information for government and enterprise networks.  For more information, please visit www.intrusion.com. This release may contain certain forward-looking statements, which reflect management's expectations regarding future events and operating performance and speak only as of the date hereof. These forward-looking statements involve a number of risks and uncertainties.  Such statements include, without limitations, statements regarding future revenue growth and profitability, the difficulties in forecasting future sales caused by current economic and market conditions, the effects of sales and implementation cycles for our products on our quarterly results and difficulties in accurately estimating market growth, the effect of military actions on government and corporate spending on information security products, spending patterns of, and appropriations to, U.S. government departments, as well as other statements.  These statements are made under the "safe harbor" provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and involve risks and uncertainties which could cause actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements.  The factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from expectations are detailed in the Company's most recent reports on Form 10-K and Form 10-Q, particularly under the heading “Risk Factors.”

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