Rochester, NY, United States
Rochester, NY, United States

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Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 2.92M | Year: 2014

The world around us is full of modern technology designed to make our lives safer, more comfortable and more efficient. Such technology is made possible by materials and devices that are able to interact with their surrounding environment either by sensing or acting upon it. Examples of such devices include motion detectors, fuel injectors, engine sensors and medical diagnostic tools. These interactive devices contain functional materials that can pose health hazards, are obtained from parts of the world where supply cannot be guaranteed or are relatively scarce. If access to these functional materials is restricted, many of these advances will no longer be available resulting in a reduction in living standards and decreased UK economic growth. There already exist a number of replacement materials that can provide the same functions without the same levels of concerns around safety, security of supply and sustainability. However, these replacement materials need to be manufactured using different processes compared to existing materials. This project explores new manufacturing technologies that could be used to create interactive devices that contains less harmful and sustainable materials with a secure supply. This project will focus on two types of material - thermoelectric and piezoelectric - where the replacement materials share a set of common challenges: they need to be processed at elevated temperatures; they contain elements that evaporate at high temperatures (making high temperature processing and processing of small elements difficult); they are mechanically fragile making it difficult to shape the materials by cutting, grinding or polishing; they are chemically stable making it difficult to shape them by etching; and many are air and moisture sensitive. The proposed research will address these challenges through three parallel research streams that proactively engage with industry. The first stream is composed of six manufacturing capability projects designed to develop the core manufacturing capabilities and know-how to support the programme. The second is a series of short term feasibility studies, conducted in collaboration with industry, to explore novel manufacturing concepts and evaluate their potential opportunities. Finally, the third stream will deliver focussed industrially orientated projects designed to develop specific manufacturing techniques for in an industrial manufacturing environment. The six manufacturing capability projects will address: 1) The production of functional material powders, using wet and dry controlled atmosphere techniques, needed as feedstock in the manufacture of bulk and printed functional materials. 2) How to produce functional materials while maintaining the required chemistry and microstructure to ensure high performance. Spark Plasma Sintering will be used to directly heat the materials and accelerate fusion of the individual powder particles using an electric current. 3) Printing of functional material inks to build up active devices without the need to assemble individual components. Combing industrially relevant printing processes, such as screen printing, with controlled rapid temperature treatments will create novel print manufacturing techniques capable of handling the substitute materials. 4) How to join and coat these new functional materials so that they can be assembled into a device or protected from harsh environments when in use. 5) The fitness of substituted material to be compatible with existing shaping and treatment stages found later in the manufacturing chain. 6) The need to ensure that the substitute materials do not pose an equal or greater risk within the manufacturing and product life cycle environment. Here lessons learned from comparable material systems will be used to help predict potential risks and exposures.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: NMP-05-2014 | Award Amount: 8.01M | Year: 2015

Printed electronics (PE) is set to revolutionise the electronics industry over the next decade and can offer Europe the opportunity to regain lost market share. Printed electronics allows for the direct printing of a range of functional (conductive, resistive, capacitive and semi-conducting) nanomaterials formulations to enable a simpler, more cost-effective, high performance and high volume processing in comparison to traditional printed circuit board and semiconductor manufacturing techniques. It has been reported by Frost and Sullivan that the market for printed electronics will increase in revenues from $0.53Bn in 2010 to $5.04 Bn in 2016 at a compound annual growth rate of 32.5%. However, the migration towards low-cost, liquid-based, high resolution deposition and patterning using high throughput techniques, such as inkjet printing, requires that suitable functional nanomaterials formulations (e.g. inks) are available for end users in industrially relevant quantities. Presently, there are issues with industrial supply of nanomaterials which are low cost, high performance, environmentally friendly and tailored for high throughput systems. Therefore better collaboration is warranted between supply chain partners to ensure nanomaterial production and nanomaterial formulations are tailored for end use applications to meet this need. The INSPIRED project will address these fundamental issues within the printed electronics industry: Ensuring that suitable functional nanomaterials formulations (inks) are available for end users in industrial scale quantities. Production of these nanomaterial formulations on an industrial scale and then depositing them using cost-effective, high throughput printing technologies enables rapid production of printed electronic components, on a wide variety of substrates. Therefore, enabling new electronics applications, whilst overcoming the problems associated with traditional manufacturing.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: NMP.2013.4.0-3 | Award Amount: 4.80M | Year: 2013

The EU has lost a significant share of the electronics manufacture sector to the Far East, resulting in a negative trade balance of >100bn/year within this sector. This is (in part) due to the current manufacturing technologies that are based on subtractive processing that are expensive, wasteful and energy intensive, making manufacture in the EU economically and environmentally unfeasible. Printed electronics is set to revolutionise the electronics industry by enabling direct, additive processing that significantly reduces capital and operating costs as well as massively reducing process hazardous chemical waste and energy. Currently the EU dominates the innovation and technological know-how in printed electronics. It is very important that this intellectual capital that Europe developed is translated to direct economic benefits by ensuring that manufacture is retained within the EU. However, there are barriers that are preventing widespread adoption of printed electronics including the availability of cost effective, high performance electronic inks, lack of awareness of end-users and lack of integration of individual printed components into large systems. PLASMAS directly builds on world-leading nano-materials, printing and display device technologies developed and patented by the consortium members. Our consortium is unique in that it covers the entire supply chain and also in terms of its ambition. PLASMAS directly addresses the current commercialisation barriers by demonstrating the capability of technology (based on novel copper and silicon inks with favourable cost to performance ratios) through development of printed circuit boards and printed logic as well as displays with printed copper and silicon-based back panels and established self-emissive OLEDs and reflective low power Electro-Chromic elements. PLASMAS will make a significant step forward in commercialising these technologies and ensuring that the commercial benefits are maximised for the EU.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: NMP-04-2014 | Award Amount: 7.89M | Year: 2015

The EU is well placed to exploit printed electronic technologies to create greater economic and social benefits for the EU, but only if we are able to commercialise innovative technologies created within the EU. Ink jet printing technologies are at the forefront of printed electronic developments. However, Ink jet printing has only been able to achieve a resolution of >=10um and the viscosity of printable inks is limited to <40 centipoise, this further limits the solids content of inks to <30-Vol% and the size of the nano-fillers to <50nm typically. These factors limit the range of functional inks that can be printed as well as the resolution and final properties of the resultant printed/sintered structures and components. The HI-RESPONSE project is based on highly innovative, patented Electro-static printing technology (ESJET) that has already been proven on TRL 4 to print to a resolution of 1um and be able to print inks with a viscosity of up to 40.000 cP. The resultant printed/sintered structures will therefore be able to achieve a high resolution and increase final component properties through enabling the printing of highly filled nano-inks and functional organic materials. This technology will be further developed to TRL 6 within the project to allow for the design and assembly of a multi-head system that can achieve resolution, speeds and cost that far surpassed that of current ink-jet systems. The resultant system will be demonstrated at TRL 6 for a wide range of materials, including: nano-Cu and nano-ceramic filled inks and organic polymers. Each of these materials will be printed to create components specifically defined and specified by the industrial organisations within the consortium: Infineon, Ficosa, Piher (Meggitt) and Zytronic. The specific end-user defined applications are: Automotive aerials and sensors, metal meshed for OLED and touch screens, conductive through silicon vias and mechanical strengthening ribs for thin Si-wafers.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-29-2014 | Award Amount: 4.36M | Year: 2015

The flexolighting programme is focussed on research and innovations on materials, processes and device technology for OLED lighting with the intention of building a supply chain within Europe. The aim is to realise OLED devices over a large area/surface with high brightness, high uniformity and long life time. A demonstrator will be built and delivered at the end of the project. The main targets are (i). Cost of the lighting panels should be less than Euro 1 per 100 lumens. (II). high luminous efficiency, in excess of 100 lm/W with improved out-coupling efficiency. (ii). white light life-time of at least 1000 hours at 97% of the original luminance of 5000 cdm-2.(iii). The materials and the devices therefrom will allow for differential aging of the colours, thus maintaining the same colour co-ordinates and CRI over its use. (iv). Attention will be paid to recyclability and environmental impact of the materials and the OLED lighting systems. Flexolighting project will also ensure European industrial leadership in lighting. The introduction of OLED Lighting technology is held back by the current cost of the systems, life-time and poor uniformity of luminance on large area panels. The programme aims to combine existing state of the art OLED materials technology (Thermally activated fluorescent materials (TADF) and phosphorescent emitters and world class transport materials) with new developments in processing technologies (Organic Vapour Phase Deposition (OVPD) and printing technologies) to develop new next of generation low cost OLED lighting systems to move forward to scale up and full scale production on novel planarized flexible steel substrates with cost effective conformal encapsulation method. The transparent top contacts made of thin metallic films, conducting polymers or graphene monolayer with metal tracks to reduce the series resistance will be employed in inverted top emitting OLED structures to deliver 100 lumens per Euro.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 272.56K | Year: 2015

Mobile device market, e.g., smartphones & tablets, continues to grow rapidly and consumers are demanding ever increasing performance within smaller electronic footprints. To meet these demands the semiconductor industry require process technology for novel IC packaging solutions using glass interposer technology. Forecasts show that by 2017, 2.5D interposers will reach a market value of $1.35Bn. The AMPS project will provide the materials and laser process technology that enables high density electronic metallisation structures for 2.5D and 3D semiconductor packaging systems using glass interposers, therefore ensuring the UK plays a valuable role in the supply chain on the next generation of semiconductor packaging architectures. The consortium partners have IPR and a route to exploitation which, when combined, forms a technology ideal to meet the technological and economic needs of the industry. IMLs nano-seed material, deposited and patterned by M-Solvs equipment allows copper to be plated in an additive process with low waste and high density of circuitisation. Atotech and Qualcomm provide access to industry level qualification and exploitation.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Feasibility Study | Award Amount: 116.93K | Year: 2016

The AMMETEX project will investigate the feasibility of ‘MetaTextiles’ - prototyping electromagnetic metamaterials including meta-textiles and meta-surfaces from a textile design-based perspective, using low cost high performance print technologies and their associated nano scale printing inks. The aim is to explore print techniques to achieve periodic textile surfaces that can be considered continuous and effective at specific frequency bands. We will develop a practice-based method for ‘MetaTextiles’, supporting experimental textile design approaches and novel materials and ink formulations versus normal approaches used in electronic and electrical engineering.. The project will identify a feasible design and manufacturing solution and carry out a simple proof of concept demonstrator to show the potential for applying MetaTextiles to high-speed mm-wave communication links. Finance Summary Table – How to complete this section Please complete the information requested in the following table in accordance with the following notes. Please ensure that the information provided is consistent with the applicable funding levels and eligible costs for yourg Public Project Summary


Patent
Intrinsiq Materials | Date: 2015-11-03

A method for filling a via on a printed circuit board formulates a paste as a dispersion of copper particulate that includes nanocopper particles in a solvent and a binder and depositing the paste into a via cavity formed in the printed circuit board. Heating the paste-filled cavity removes most of the solvent. The method sinters the deposited paste in the via cavity, planarizes the sintered via, and overplates the filled via with copper.


Patent
Ibm, Conpart AS, Intrinsiq Materials and Jerzy Haber Institute Of Catalysis And Surface Chemistry | Date: 2015-10-12

A bridging arrangement includes a first and a second surface defining a gap therebetween. At least one surface of the first and second surface has an anisotropic energy landscape. A plurality of particles defines a path between the first and second surface bridging the gap.


Patent
Ibm, Intrinsiq Materials, TU Chemnitz and Sintef | Date: 2015-11-05

A method for electrically coupling a pad and a front face of a pillar, including shaping the front face pillar, the front face having at least partially a convex surface, applying a suspension to the front face or to the pad, wherein the suspension includes a carrier fluid, electrically conducting microparticles and electrically conducting nanoparticles, arranging the front face of the pillar opposite to the pad at a distance such that the carrier fluid bridges at least partially a gap between the front face of the pillar and the pad, evaporating the carrier fluid thereby confining the microparticles and the nanoparticles, and thereby arranging the nanoparticles and the microparticles as percolation paths between the front face of the pillar and the pad, and sintering the arranged nanoparticles for forming metallic bonds at least between the nanoparticles and/or between the nanoparticles and the front face of the pillar or the pad.

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