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PubMed | Leiden University, University of Groningen and Intravacc Institute for Translational Vaccinology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of pharmaceutics | Year: 2016

Spray dried vaccine formulations might be an alternative to traditional lyophilized vaccines. Compared to lyophilization, spray drying is a fast and cheap process extensively used for drying biologicals. The current study provides an approach that utilizes Design of Experiments for spray drying process to stabilize whole inactivated influenza virus (WIV) vaccine. The approach included systematically screening and optimizing the spray drying process variables, determining the desired process parameters and predicting product quality parameters. The process parameters inlet air temperature, nozzle gas flow rate and feed flow rate and their effect on WIV vaccine powder characteristics such as particle size, residual moisture content (RMC) and powder yield were investigated. Vaccine powders with a broad range of physical characteristics (RMC 1.2-4.9%, particle size 2.4-8.5m and powder yield 42-82%) were obtained. WIV showed no significant loss in antigenicity as revealed by hemagglutination test. Furthermore, descriptive models generated by DoE software could be used to determine and select (set) spray drying process parameter. This was used to generate a dried WIV powder with predefined (predicted) characteristics. Moreover, the spray dried vaccine powders retained their antigenic stability even after storage for 3 months at 60C. The approach used here enabled the generation of a thermostable, antigenic WIV vaccine powder with desired physical characteristics that could be potentially used for pulmonary administration.


Soema P.C.,Intravacc Institute for Translational Vaccinology | Soema P.C.,Leiden University | Rosendahl Huber S.K.,National Institute for Public Health and the Environment RIVM | Willems G.-J.,Intravacc Institute for Translational Vaccinology | And 4 more authors.
Pharmaceutical Research | Year: 2015

Purpose: Influenza CD8+ T-cell epitopes are conserved amongst influenza strains and can be recognized by influenza-specific cytotoxic T-cells (CTLs), which can rapidly clear infected cells. An influenza peptide vaccine that elicits these CTLs would therefore be an alternative to current influenza vaccines, which are not cross-reactive. However, peptide antigens are poorly immunogenic due to lack of delivery to antigen presenting cells, and therefore need additional formulation with a suitable delivery system. In this study, the potential of virosomes as a delivery system for an influenza T-cell peptide was investigated. Methods: The conserved human HLA-A2.1 influenza T-cell epitope M158-66 was formulated with virosomes. The immunogenicity and protective effect of the peptide-loaded virosomes was assessed in HLA-A2 transgenic mice. Delivery properties of the virosomes were studied in mice and in in vitro dendritic cell cultures. Results: Immunization of HLA-A2.1 transgenic C57BL/6 mice with peptide-loaded virosomes in the presence of the adjuvant CpG-ODN 1826 increased the number of peptide-specific CTLs. Vaccination with adjuvanted peptide-loaded virosomes reduced weight loss in mice after heterologous influenza infection. Association with fusion-active virosomes was found to be crucial for antigen uptake by dendritic cells, and subsequent induction of CTLs in mice. Conclusions: These results show that influenza virosomes loaded with conserved influenza epitopes could be the basis of a novel cross-protective influenza vaccine. © 2014 The Author(s).


Soema P.C.,Intravacc Institute for Translational Vaccinology | Soema P.C.,Leiden University | Kompier R.,Intravacc Institute for Translational Vaccinology | Amorij J.-P.,Intravacc Institute for Translational Vaccinology | And 2 more authors.
European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics | Year: 2015

Abstract Vaccination is the most effective method to prevent influenza infection. However, current influenza vaccines have several limitations. Relatively long production times, limited vaccine capacity, moderate efficacy in certain populations and lack of cross-reactivity are important issues that need to be addressed. We give an overview of the current status and novel developments in the landscape of influenza vaccines from an interdisciplinary point of view. The feasibility of novel vaccine concepts not only depends on immunological or clinical outcomes, but also depends on biotechnological aspects, such as formulation and production methods, which are frequently overlooked. Furthermore, the next generation of influenza vaccines is addressed, which hopefully will bring cross-reactive influenza vaccines. These developments indicate that an exciting future lies ahead in the influenza vaccine field. © 2015 The Authors.


Kraan H.,Intravacc Institute for Translational Vaccinology | Vrieling H.,Leiden University | Czerkinsky C.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Jiskoot W.,Leiden University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Controlled Release | Year: 2014

Because of their large surface area and immunological competence, mucosal tissues are attractive administration and target sites for vaccination. An important characteristic of mucosal vaccination is its ability to elicit local immune responses, which act against infection at the site of pathogen entry. However, mucosal surfaces are endowed with potent and sophisticated tolerance mechanisms to prevent the immune system from overreacting to the many environmental antigens. Hence, mucosal vaccination may suppress the immune system instead of induce a protective immune response. Therefore, mucosal adjuvants and/or special antigen delivery systems as well as appropriate dosage forms are required in order to develop potent mucosal vaccines. Whereas oral, nasal and pulmonary vaccine delivery strategies have been described extensively, the sublingual and buccal routes have received considerably less attention. In this review, the characteristics of and approaches for sublingual and buccal vaccine delivery are described and compared with other mucosal vaccine delivery sites. We discuss recent progress and highlight promising developments in the search for vaccine formulations, including adjuvants and suitable dosage forms, which are likely critical for designing a successful sublingual or buccal vaccine. Finally, we outline the challenges, hurdles to overcome and formulation issues relevant for sublingual or buccal vaccine delivery. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.


Kraan H.,Intravacc Institute for Translational Vaccinology | van der Stel W.,Leiden University | Kersten G.,Leiden University | Amorij J.-P.,Intravacc Institute for Translational Vaccinology
Expert Review of Vaccines | Year: 2016

Global polio eradication is closer than ever. Replacement of the live attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) by inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) is recommended to achieve complete eradication. Limited global production capacity and relatively high IPV costs compared to OPV spur the need for improved polio vaccines. The target product profile of these vaccines includes not only dose sparing but also high stability, which is important for stockpiling, and easy application important for (emergency) vaccination campaigns. In this review, the current status of alternative polio vaccine delivery strategies is given. Furthermore, we discuss the feasibility of these strategies by highlighting challenges, hurdles to overcome, and formulation issues relevant for optimal vaccine delivery. © 2016 Taylor & Francis


Kraan H.,Intravacc Institute for Translational Vaccinology | ten Have R.,Intravacc Institute for Translational Vaccinology | van der Maas L.,Intravacc Institute for Translational Vaccinology | Kersten G.,Leiden University | Amorij J.-P.,Virtuvax BV
Vaccine | Year: 2016

A hexavalent vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, whole cell pertussis, . Haemophilius influenza type B, hepatitis B and inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) may: (i) increase the efficiency of vaccination campaigns, (ii) reduce the number of injections thereby reducing needlestick injuries, and (iii) ensure better protection against pertussis as compared to vaccines containing acellular pertussis antigens. An approach to obtain a hexavalent vaccine might be reconstituting lyophilized polio vaccine (IPV-LYO) with liquid pentavalent vaccine just before intramuscular delivery. The potential limitations of this approach were investigated including thermostability of IPV as measured by D-antigen ELISA and rat potency, the compatibility of fluid and lyophilized IPV in combination with thimerosal and thimerosal containing hexavalent vaccine.The rat potency of polio type 3 in IPV-LYO was 2 to 3-fold lower than standardized on the D-antigen content, suggesting an alteration of the polio type 3 D-antigen particle by lyophilization. Type 1 and 2 had unaffected antigenicity/immunogenicity ratios. Alteration of type 3 D-antigen could be detected by showing reduced thermostability at 45. °C compared to type 3 in non-lyophilized liquid controls.Reconstituting IPV-LYO in the presence of thimerosal (TM) resulted in a fast temperature dependent loss of polio type 1-3 D-antigen. The presence of 0.005% TM reduced the D-antigen content by ∼20% (polio type 2/3) and ∼60% (polio type 1) in 6. h at 25. °C, which are WHO open vial policy conditions. At 37. °C, D-antigen was diminished even faster, suggesting that very fast, i.e., immediately after preparation, intramuscular delivery of the conceived hexavalent vaccine would not be a feasible option. Use of the TM-scavenger, . l-cysteine, to bind TM (or mercury containing TM degradation products), resulted in a hexavalent vaccine mixture in which polio D-antigen was more stable. © 2016 The Authors.


PubMed | Leiden University and Intravacc Institute for Translational Vaccinology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Expert review of vaccines | Year: 2016

Global polio eradication is closer than ever. Replacement of the live attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) by inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) is recommended to achieve complete eradication. Limited global production capacity and relatively high IPV costs compared to OPV spur the need for improved polio vaccines. The target product profile of these vaccines includes not only dose sparing but also high stability, which is important for stockpiling, and easy application important for (emergency) vaccination campaigns. In this review, the current status of alternative polio vaccine delivery strategies is given. Furthermore, we discuss the feasibility of these strategies by highlighting challenges, hurdles to overcome, and formulation issues relevant for optimal vaccine delivery.


PubMed | Leiden University, Bioneedle Technologies Group BV and Intravacc Institute for Translational Vaccinology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Vaccine | Year: 2015

In the near future oral polio vaccine (OPV) will be replaced by inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) as part of the eradication program of polio. For that reason, there is a need for substantial amount of safe and more affordable IPV for low-income countries. Bioneedles, which are biodegradable mini-implants, have the potential to deliver vaccines outside the cold-chain and administer them without the use of needles and syringes. In the current study, Bioneedles were filled with IPV, subsequently lyophilized, and antigenic recoveries were determined both directly after IPV-Bioneedle preparation as well as after elevated stability testing. Further, we assessed the immunogenicity of IPV-Bioneedles in rats and the residence time at the site of administration. Trivalent IPV was formulated in Bioneedles with recoveries of 10110%, 11318%, and 9215%, respectively for serotypes 1, 2 and 3. IPV in Bioneedles is more resistant to elevated temperatures than liquid IPV: liquid IPV retained less than half of its antigenicity after 1 day at 45C and IPV in Bioneedles showed remaining recoveries of 8010%, 854% and 634% for the three serotypes. In vivo imaging revealed that IPV administered via Bioneedles as well as subcutaneously injected liquid IPV showed a retention time of 3 days at the site of administration. Finally, an immunogenicity study showed that IPV-filled Bioneedles are able to induce virus-neutralizing antibody titers similar to those obtained by liquid intramuscular injection when administered in a booster regime. The addition of LPS-derivate PagL in IPV-filled Bioneedles did not increase immunogenicity compared to IPV-Bioneedles without adjuvant. The current study demonstrates the pre-clinical proof of concept of IPV-filled Bioneedles as a syringe-free alternative delivery system. Further pre-clinical and clinical studies will be required to assess the feasibility whether IPV-Bioneedles show sufficient safety and efficacy, and may contribute to the efforts to eradicate and prevent polio in the future.


PubMed | Leiden University and Intravacc Institute for Translational Vaccinology
Type: | Journal: European journal of pharmaceutics and biopharmaceutics : official journal of Arbeitsgemeinschaft fur Pharmazeutische Verfahrenstechnik e.V | Year: 2015

Vaccination is the most effective method to prevent influenza infection. However, current influenza vaccines have several limitations. Relatively long production times, limited vaccine capacity, moderate efficacy in certain populations and lack of cross-reactivity are important issues that need to be addressed. We give an overview of the current status and novel developments in the landscape of influenza vaccines from an interdisciplinary point of view. The feasibility of novel vaccine concepts not only depends on immunological or clinical outcomes, but also depends on biotechnological aspects, such as formulation and production methods, which are frequently overlooked. Furthermore, the next generation of influenza vaccines is addressed, which hopefully will bring cross-reactive influenza vaccines. These developments indicate that an exciting future lies ahead in the influenza vaccine field.


PubMed | Intravacc Institute for Translational Vaccinology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Pharmaceutical research | Year: 2015

Influenza CD8(+) T-cell epitopes are conserved amongst influenza strains and can be recognized by influenza-specific cytotoxic T-cells (CTLs), which can rapidly clear infected cells. An influenza peptide vaccine that elicits these CTLs would therefore be an alternative to current influenza vaccines, which are not cross-reactive. However, peptide antigens are poorly immunogenic due to lack of delivery to antigen presenting cells, and therefore need additional formulation with a suitable delivery system. In this study, the potential of virosomes as a delivery system for an influenza T-cell peptide was investigated.The conserved human HLA-A2.1 influenza T-cell epitope M158-66 was formulated with virosomes. The immunogenicity and protective effect of the peptide-loaded virosomes was assessed in HLA-A2 transgenic mice. Delivery properties of the virosomes were studied in mice and in in vitro dendritic cell cultures.Immunization of HLA-A2.1 transgenicC57BL/6 mice with peptide-loaded virosomes in the presence of the adjuvant CpG-ODN 1826 increased the number ofpeptide-specific CTLs. Vaccination with adjuvanted peptide-loaded virosomes reduced weight loss in mice after heterologous influenza infection. Association with fusion-active virosomes was found to be crucial for antigen uptake by dendritic cells, and subsequent induction of CTLs in mice.These results show that influenza virosomes loaded with conserved influenza epitopes could be the basis of a novel cross-protective influenza vaccine.

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