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Baltimore, MD, United States

The present invention provides a method for reducing the risk of bacterial infection or sepsis in a susceptible patient by treating the susceptible patient with a pharmaceutical composition containing bacteriophage of one or more strains which produce lytic infections in pathogenic bacteria. Preferably, treatment of the patient reduces the level of colonization with pathogenic bacteria susceptible to the bacteriophage by at least one log. In a typical embodiment, the susceptible patient is an immunocompromised patient selected from the group consisting of leukemia patients, lymphoma patients, carcinoma patients, sarcoma patients, allogeneic transplant patients, congenital or acquired immunodeficiency patients, cystic fibrosis patients, and AIDS patients. In a preferred mode, the patients treated by this method are colonized with the pathogenic bacteria subject to infection by said bacteriophage.


Grant
Agency: Department of Agriculture | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.98K | Year: 2011

Our project envisions developing a bacteriophage-based product, designated SalmoShield, for eliminating or significantly reducing contamination of poultry products (and eventually other foods) with Salmonella. Salmonellae continue to be one of the leading causes of foodborne disease worldwide, causing 1.3-1.4 million cases of salmonellosis annually in the USA, with associated costs estimated to be as high as $12.8 billion/year (in 1998 dollars). According to the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), ca. 75% of the annual cases of human salmonellosis are due to the consumption of contaminated poultry, beef, and egg product. In the absence of a definitive means of eradicating the bacteria, the USDA articulated the concept of Salmonella control through a "multiple hurdle" approach, which encourages implementation of procedures to reduce the risk of contamination during slaughter, while at the same time seeking to limit contamination of broiler flocks and the final food products. Under these circumstances, there is a clear need and market for products and approaches that can be used as part of an overall program of Salmonella control. Any such product should be effective, cheap, safe, environmentally-friendly, and easy to use - and there would also be potential advantages for products that target specific Salmonella serotypes; e.g., serotypes predominantly associated with human illness. Bacteriophage-based preparations may be one such modality. Indeed, lytic bacteriophages possess strong bactericidal activity against their specific bacterial hosts; thus, they have the potential to eliminate or significantly reduce the levels of their targeted bacteria in various food safety-relevant settings. The SalmoShield preparation, and the technology described in this proposal, have a potential to help significantly reduce Salmonella contamination of poultry, and, therefore, to have a significant impact on improving food safety/public health, and on reducing the cost of manufacturing and buying poultry products.


Magnone J.P.,Natick Soldier Research Development and Engineering Center | Marek P.J.,Natick Soldier Research Development and Engineering Center | Sulakvelidze A.,Intralytix, Inc. | Senecal A.G.,Natick Soldier Research Development and Engineering Center
Journal of Food Protection | Year: 2013

The incidence of foodborne outbreaks involving fresh produce is of worldwide concern. Lytic bacteriophage cocktails and a levulinic acid produce wash were investigated for their effectiveness against the foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7, Shigella spp., and Salmonella on broccoli, cantaloupe, and strawberries. Inoculated samples were treated with bacteriophage cocktails (BC) before storage at 10°C for 24 h, a levulinic acid produce wash (PW) after storage at 10°C for 24 h, or a combination of the washes (BCPW) before and after storage. All three treatments were compared against a 200-ppm free available chlorine wash. Wash solutions were prepared using potable water and water with an increased organic content of 2.5 g/liter total dissolved solids and total organic carbon. BCPW was the most effective treatment, producing the highest log reductions in the pathogens. Produce treated with BCPW in potable water with a PW exposure time of 5 min resulted in the highest reduction of each pathogen for all samples tested. The type of produce and wash solution had significant effects on the efficacy of the individual treatments. The chlorine wash in water with higher organic content was the least effective treatment tested. An additive effect of BCPWwas seen in water with higher organic content, resulting in greater than 4.0-log reductions in pathogens. Our findings indicate that the combination of antimicrobial BC with a commercial produce wash is a very effective method for treating produce contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, Shigella spp., and Salmonella even in the presence of high loads of organic matter. Copyright © International Association for Food Protection. Source


The present invention provides a method for reducing the risk of bacterial infection or sepsis in a susceptible patient by treating the susceptible patient with a pharmaceutical composition containing bacteriophage of one or more strains which produce lytic infections in pathogenic bacteria. Preferably, treatment of the patient reduces the level of colonization with pathogenic bacteria susceptible to the bacteriophage by at least one log. In a typical embodiment, the susceptible patient is an immunocompromised patient selected from the group consisting of leukemia patients, lymphoma patients, carcinoma patients, sarcoma patients, allogeneic transplant patients, congenital or acquired immunodeficiency patients, cystic fibrosis patients, and AIDS patients. In a preferred mode, the patients treated by this method are colonized with the pathogenic bacteria subject to infection by said bacteriophage.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.99K | Year: 2009

Treatment of bacterial-infected wounds is one the most critical problems in modern medicine, and it presents one of the most significant challenges for US troops during combat operations. The management of bacteria in wounds is complicated by the existence of multidrug-resistant strains and mutants. Therefore, novel modalities for preventing and treating wound infections, one of which may be highly purified and characterized bacteriophage preparations, are required. Lytic phages (i.e., bacterial viruses that infect and lyse their specific bacterial hosts) have been used to treat bacterial infections since their discovery during the first decade of the 20th century. However, their therapeutic use gradually declined in the “Western World” after the advent of antibiotics. At the present time, there is renewed interest in phage-based prophylactic and therapeutic approaches because phages are active against multidrug-resistant, pathogenic bacterial strains and mutants. Our current application proposes to develop a potent lytic bacteriophage preparation/cocktail against A. baumannii – a major wound pathogen of particular concern to the US Army, and an increasingly important public health problem. In addition, we will develop two murine wound-infection models for future studies evaluating our A. baumannii phage cocktail’s efficacy in treating A. baumannii wound infections.

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