International Survey of Herbicide Resistan Weeds

Corvallis, OR, United States

International Survey of Herbicide Resistan Weeds

Corvallis, OR, United States

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Holt J.S.,University of California at Riverside | Welles S.R.,University of California at Riverside | Silvera K.,Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute | Heap I.M.,International Survey of Herbicide Resistan Weeds | And 5 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Evolved herbicide resistance (EHR) is an important agronomic problem and consequently a food security problem, as it jeopardizes herbicide effectiveness and increases the difficulty and cost of weed management. EHR in weeds was first reported in 1970 and the number of cases has accelerated dramatically over the last two decades. Despite 40 years of research on EHR, why some weeds evolve resistance and others do not is poorly understood. Here we ask whether weed species that have EHR are different from weeds in general. Comparing taxonomic and life history traits of weeds with EHR to a control group ("the world's worst weeds"), we found weeds with EHR significantly over-represented in certain plant families and having certain life history biases. In particular, resistance is overrepresented in Amaranthaceae, Brassicaceae and Poaceae relative to all weeds, and annuality is ca. 1.5 times as frequent in weeds with EHR as in the control group. Also, for perennial EHR weeds, vegetative reproduction is only 60% as frequent as in the control group. We found the same trends for subsets of weeds with EHR to acetolactate synthase (ALS), photosystem II (PSII), and 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase-inhibitor herbicides and with multiple resistance. As herbicide resistant crops (transgenic or not) are increasingly deployed in developing countries, the problems of EHR could increase in those countries as it has in the USA if the selecting herbicides are heavily applied and appropriate management strategies are not employed. Given our analysis, we make some predictions about additional species that might evolve resistance. © 2013 Holt et al.


Heap I.,International Survey of Herbicide Resistan Weeds
Pest Management Science | Year: 2014

Two hundred and twenty weed species have evolved resistance to one or more herbicides, and there are now 404 unique cases (species×site of action) of herbicide-resistant weeds globally. ALS inhibitor-resistant weeds account for about a third of all cases (133/404) and are particularly troublesome in rice and cereals. Although 71 weed species have been identified with triazine resistance, their importance has dwindled with the shift towards Roundup Ready® crops in the USA and the reduction of triazine usage in Europe. Forty-three grasses have evolved resistance to ACCase inhibitors, with the most serious cases being Avenaspp., Loliumspp., Phalarisspp., Setariaspp. and Alopecurusmyosuroides, infesting more than 25million hectares of cereal production globally. Of the 24 weed species with glyphosate resistance, 16 have been found in Roundup Ready® cropping systems. Although Conyzacanadensis is the most widespread glyphosate-resistant weed, Amaranthuspalmeri and Amaranthustuberculartus are the two most economically important glyphosate-resistant weeds because of the area they infest and the fact that these species have evolved resistance to numerous other herbicide sites of action, leaving growers with few herbicidal options for their control. The agricultural chemical industry has not brought any new herbicides with novel sites of action to market in over 30years, making growers reliant on using existing herbicides in new ways. In addition, tougher registration and environmental regulations on herbicides have resulted in a loss of some herbicides, particularly in Europe. The lack of novel herbicide chemistries being brought to market combined with the rapid increase in multiple resistance in weeds threatens crop production worldwide. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

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