International Strategic Cancer Alliance

Philadelphia, United States

International Strategic Cancer Alliance

Philadelphia, United States
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Hode T.,ImmunoPhotonics Inc. | Guerra M.C.,ImmunoPhotonics Inc. | Ferrel G.L.,Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins | Lunn J.A.,8 Collins Ave. | And 3 more authors.
Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE | Year: 2010

Laser Immunotherapy is an experimental treatment modality for late-stage, metastatic tumors, which targets solid primary and/or secondary tumors and utilizes an autologous vaccine-like approach to stimulate immune responses. Specifically, laser immunotherapy combines laser-induced in situ tumor devitalization with an immunoadjuvant for local immunostimulation. Here we report the initial results from a human breast cancer pilot trial with laser immunotherapy. Six stage III and IV cancer patients were treated, all of which were considered to be out of all other options, and preliminary data at the three-month examination are presented. The immediate goal of the trial was to determine the patient tolerance and the toxicity of the therapy, the optimal dose for the alteration of the course of the disease, and the reduction of the tumor burden. Each patient was individually evaluated for toxicity tolerance through physical exams and by appropriate supplemental and routine laboratory tests. Observable tumors in patients were followed with physical examination and radiological evaluations. Treatment efficacy was judged by the size and number of local and distant metastases before and after treatment. © 2010 Copyright SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering.


Li X.,Chinese PLA General Hospital | Li X.,University of Central Oklahoma | Hode T.,ImmunoPhotonics Inc. | Guerra M.C.,ImmunoPhotonics Inc. | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Innovative Optical Health Sciences | Year: 2010

Metastasis to distant sites is a severe treatment challenge and a major cause of death for breast cancer patients. Laser immunotherapy (LIT) is a novel technique, combining a selective photothermal therapy with local application of glycated chitosan, a potent immunoadjuvant. The pre-clinical studies of LIT have shown its unique characteristics in generating specific antitumor immunity. The clinical application of LIT in the treatment of melanoma patients has achieved preliminary success. Recently, LIT has been used to treat late-stage breast cancer patients. Here we report for the first time the clinical results of this combination therapy in breast cancer patients. The LIT treatment procedures are presented and the medical history of two stage IV breast cancer patients is reviewed. Most of the breast cancer lesions and the metastasis of lung and brain disappeared after repeated treatments of LIT. One patient achieved complete response; the other achieved partial response at the time of this report. Although there is still a long way for LIT to become a standard modality for breast cancer treatment, the results of this study indicated its promising future. © 2010 World Scientific Publishing Company.


Hode T.,ImmunoPhotonics Inc. | Adalsteinsson O.,International Strategic Cancer Alliance | Ferrel G.L.,Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins | Lunn J.A.,8 Commonwealth Medical Research Institute and 8 Collins Avenue | And 4 more authors.
Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE | Year: 2011

The immediate goal of the trial was to determine the breast cancer patient tolerance and the toxicity of Laser immunotherapy (LIT), the optimal dose for the alteration of the course of the disease, and the reduction of the tumor burden. Ten stage III and IV cancer patients were treated, all of which were considered to be out of all other options. No toxicity or significant adverse reactions were observed and the treatment was well tolerated by all patients. Almost all the treated patients have had positive responses: A majority of patients experienced large-scale reduction of primary breast tumors, and all the stage IV patients experienced either complete or significant reductions in distant metastases in the lungs, liver, bone, and the brain, indicating a strong systemic effect of the treatment. We also report two cases of triple negative breast cancer patients that showed limited or no response to LIT. © 2011 SPIE.


Li X.,Chinese PLA General Hospital | Li X.,University of Central Oklahoma | Ferrel G.L.,Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins | Guerra M.C.,ImmunoPhotonics Inc. | And 6 more authors.
Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences | Year: 2011

We report our preliminary results of a pilot clinical trial of late-stage breast cancer patients treated by laser immunotherapy (LIT), a local intervention using an 805 nm laser for non-invasive irradiation, indocyanine green for selective thermal effect, and immunoadjuvant (glycated chitosan) for immunological stimulation. Ten breast cancer patients were enrolled in this study; all patients were considered to be out of other available treatment options. Toxicity was individually evaluated through physical exams and laboratory tests. Adverse reactions only occurred in the area of treatment due to photothermal injury and local administration of immunoadjuvant. No grade 3 or 4 side effects were observed. Treatment efficacy of LIT was also evaluated by physical examination and tomography. In 8 patients available for evaluation, the objective response rate was 62.5% and the clinical beneficial response rate was 75%. While the study is still ongoing, the initial outcomes of this clinical trial show that LIT is well tolerated and is promising in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry and Owner Societies.


Li X.,Chinese PLA General Hospital | Min M.,Academy of Military Medical science | Gu Y.,Chinese PLA General Hospital | Du N.,Chinese PLA General Hospital | And 7 more authors.
IEEE Journal on Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics | Year: 2012

Laser immunotherapy (LIT) is an in situ autologous cancer vaccine (inCVAX) that induces a systemic immune responses through a local intervention. The effect of LIT depends on two major interactions: a selective photothermal interaction and an active immunological stimulation. The selective photothermal interaction can help release tumor antigens, which can stimulate specific antitumor immunity in the host. The elevated expression of heat-shock protein and the local application of immunoadjuvant further enhance the immune responses. The safety and effectiveness of LIT have been tested in preclinical studies and in preliminary clinical trials. Tumor samples from breast cancer patients treated by LIT were analyzed using histochemical methods. Preliminary results showed a change in T cells after LIT treatment, indicating strong induced immune responses. LIT may be proven to be a feasible treatment modality for metastatic cancers. © 2012 IEEE.


Strum S.B.,International Strategic Cancer Alliance | Adalsteinsson O.,International Strategic Cancer Alliance | Black R.R.,Radisphere Teleradiology Group | Segal D.,Valley Radiology Consultants | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Bioenergetics and Biomembranes | Year: 2013

The uptake of fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography in the tumors of various cancer types demonstrates the key role of glucose in the proliferation of cancer. Dichloroacetate is a 2-carbon molecule having crucial biologic activity in altering the metabolic breakdown of glucose to lactic acid. Human cell line studies show that dichloroacetate switches alter the metabolomics of the cancer cell from one of glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation, and in doing so restore mitochondrial functions that trigger apoptosis of the cancer cell. Reports of dichloroacetate in human subjects are rare. The authors contacted individuals from Internet forums who had reported outstanding anti-cancer responses to self-medication with dichloroacetate. With informed consent, complete medical records were requested to document response to dichloroacetate, emphasizing the context of monotherapy with dichloroacetate. Of ten patients agreeing to such an evaluation, only one met the criteria of having comprehensive clinic records as well as pathology, imaging and laboratory reports, along with single agent therapy with dichloroacetate. That individual is the focus of this report. In this case report of a man with documented relapse after state-of-the-art chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a significant response to dichloroacetate is documented with a complete remission, which remains ongoing after 4 years. Dichloroacetate appears to be a novel therapy warranting further investigation in the treatment of cancer. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media New York.


PubMed | International Strategic Cancer Alliance
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Journal of bioenergetics and biomembranes | Year: 2013

The uptake of fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography in the tumors of various cancer types demonstrates the key role of glucose in the proliferation of cancer. Dichloroacetate is a 2-carbon molecule having crucial biologic activity in altering the metabolic breakdown of glucose to lactic acid. Human cell line studies show that dichloroacetate switches alter the metabolomics of the cancer cell from one of glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation, and in doing so restore mitochondrial functions that trigger apoptosis of the cancer cell. Reports of dichloroacetate in human subjects are rare. The authors contacted individuals from Internet forums who had reported outstanding anti-cancer responses to self-medication with dichloroacetate. With informed consent, complete medical records were requested to document response to dichloroacetate, emphasizing the context of monotherapy with dichloroacetate. Of ten patients agreeing to such an evaluation, only one met the criteria of having comprehensive clinic records as well as pathology, imaging and laboratory reports, along with single agent therapy with dichloroacetate. That individual is the focus of this report. In this case report of a man with documented relapse after state-of-the-art chemotherapy for non-Hodgkins lymphoma, a significant response to dichloroacetate is documented with a complete remission, which remains ongoing after 4 years. Dichloroacetate appears to be a novel therapy warranting further investigation in the treatment of cancer.

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