Silver Spring, MARYLAND, United States
Silver Spring, MARYLAND, United States

The International Partnership for Microbicides or IPM is a non-profit product development partnership founded by Dr. Zeda Rosenberg in 2002 to prevent HIV transmission by accelerating the development and availability of a safe and effective microbicide for use by women in developing countries.Since its inception, IPM has focused on developing HIV-prevention products for women including gels, films, tablets and rings that contain antiretroviral -based microbicides. Rights to incorporate existing ARVs into products developed specifically for use in developing countries have been negotiated with pharmaceutical companies working in the HIV field. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH-2009-2.3.2-3 | Award Amount: 17.07M | Year: 2010

This proposal is for a large scale collaborative project in which we propose both to develop novel microbicides directed against new intracellular targets and to investigate novel combinations of highly active anti-retroviral drugs which may be particularly effective as microbicides. Combinations may enhance efficacy but equally importantly will increase the genetic barrier to the development of resistance. The proposal includes development of both slow release and gel formulations, pharmacokinetic and challenge experiments in macaques as well as human studies including a collaborative study with an EDCTP-funded project to use multiplex and proteomic technologies as well as culture-independent DNA-based analysis of mucosal microbiota to investigate biomarkers and establish a baseline signature from which perturbations can be recognised. This is a large consortium comprising 30 partners from 8 EU countries and from Switzerland, Ukraine, South Africa and the United States.Partners include microbicide developers, IPM and Particle Sciences, and producers, Gilead, Tibotec and Virco. Two SMEs will also participate in RTD aspects. The consortium is multidisciplinary with scientists engaged in basic discovery working with new targets and developing novel chemistry to produce compounds with improved safety and efficacy profiles as well as altered patterns of resistance.


Shattock R.J.,St George's, University of London | Rosenberg Z.,International Partnership For Microbicides
Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine | Year: 2012

Microbicides represent a potential intervention strategy for preventing HIV transmission. Vaginal microbicides would meet the need for a discreet method that women could use to protect themselves against HIV. Although early-generation microbicides failed to demonstrate efficacy, newer candidates are based on more potent antiretroviral (ARV) products. Positive data from the CAPRISA 004 trial of tenofovir gel support use in women and represent a turning point for the field. This article reviews current progress in development of ARV-based microbicides. We discuss the consensus on selection criteria, the potential for drug resistance, rationale for drug combinations, and the use of pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) assessment in product development. The urgent need for continued progress in development of formulations for sustained delivery is emphasized. Finally, as the boundaries between different prevention technologies become increasingly blurred, consideration is given to the potential synergy of diverse approaches across the prevention landscape. © 2012 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.


Patent
Conrad and International Partnership For Microbicides | Date: 2010-09-24

The present invention relates to formulations of nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), preferably [2-(6-Amino-purin-9-yl)-1-methyl-ethoxymethyl]-phosphonic acid (tenofovir, PMPA), or a physiologically functional derivative thereof, suitable for topical application and their use in the prevention of HIV infections.


Patent
Conrad and International Partnership For Microbicides | Date: 2010-09-29

The present invention relates to formulations of nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), preferably [2-(6-Amino-purin-9-yl)-1-methyl-ethoxymethyl]-phosphonic acid (tenofovir, PMPA), or a physiologically functional derivative thereof, suitable for topical application and their use in the prevention of HIV infections.


Patent
Eastern Virginia Medical School and International Partnership For Microbicides | Date: 2015-05-18

The present invention relates to formulations of nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), preferably [2-(6-Amino-purin-9-yl)-1-methyl-ethoxymethyl]-phosphonic acid (tenofovir, PMPA), or a physiologically functional derivative thereof, suitable for topical application and their use in the prevention of HIV infections.


Nuttall J.,International Partnership For Microbicides
Drugs | Year: 2010

More than 28 years since the first cases of HIVAIDS, there is still no cure or vaccine. The worst affected region is sub-Saharan Africa and, increasingly, it is young women who are bearing the brunt of the epidemic. Consequently, there is an urgent need for HIV prevention options for women in developing countries. Microbicides are topical products that can be used vaginally by women to impede sexual transmission of HIV and thus represent one of the most promising prevention strategies. Efficacy trials with early nonspecific microbicide gels have so far been unsuccessful, but the field has now switched its focus to products containing highly potent and highly specific antiretroviral drugs that are easier to use, and can be formulated in a variety of dosage forms to suit individual and regional preferences. However, these products have their own challenges, with a greater likelihood of absorption, and the potential for systemic toxicities or the development of resistance in infected individuals who are unaware of their HIV status. The conduct of clinical trials is complex for all microbicides, with limited availability of trial sites, difficulties in dose selection and safety monitoring, and a lack of a truly objective measure of adherence. Once a microbicide has been shown to be safe and effective, there will need to be a clear pathway to regulatory approval, and the successful launch of a product will depend on having in place appropriate methods for distribution to the women who need it, along with a strategy for ensuring that they use it correctly. This will require substantial effort in terms of education and community engagement, and these activities need to be initiated well in advance of microbicide rollout. © 2010 Adis Data Information BV. All rights reserved.


Holt J.D.S.,International Partnership For Microbicides | Nuttall J.P.,International Partnership For Microbicides
Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology | Year: 2015

Before pharmaceutical products are evaluated in humans, it is essential that they undergo a rigorous safety assessment using in vitro models and studies in preclinical species. Once products progress into the clinic, additional preclinical studies are needed to support further clinical testing. Although regulatory guidelines provide a good framework for the types of studies that should be performed, there are some areas where it is unclear how these should be applied to microbicides, what study designs should be used, whether certain tests are relevant or if additional assays are appropriate. In this chapter we provide an overview of the key issues for the preclinical development of microbicides, and describe the purpose of each of the tests along with the key considerations to be taken into account when designing the individual safety studies as well as the overall preclinical program. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013.


Patent
International Partnership For Microbicides | Date: 2013-10-11

The present invention provides improved intravaginal drug delivery devices, i.e., intravaginal rings, useful for the prophylactic administration of an antimicrobial compound, e.g., Dapivirine, to a human. The intravaginal rings of the invention address previous stability issues by utilizing a platinum catalyst (e.g., in the form of a platinum-siloxane complex) for the cross-linking reaction. The vaginal rings surprisingly achieve relatively high and steady release rates in vivo with a matrix ring containing a relatively small loading dose. While the matrix rings of the present invention have in vivo the steady release rates associated with reservoir rings, they are easier and less expensive to manufacture. The present invention also provides methods of blocking DNA polymerization by an HIV reverse transcriptase enzyme, methods of preventing HIV infection in a female human, methods of treating HIV infection in a female human, and methods of preparing platinum-catalyzed intravaginal rings.


Patent
International Partnership For Microbicides | Date: 2011-10-19

The present invention provides improved intravaginal drug delivery devices, i.e., intravaginal rings, useful for the prophylactic administration of an antimicrobial compound, e.g., Dapivirine, to a human. The intravaginal rings of the invention address previous stability issues by utilizing a platinum catalyst (e.g., in the form of a platinum-siloxane complex) for the cross-linking reaction. The vaginal rings surprisingly achieve relatively high and steady release rates in vivo with a matrix ring containing a relatively small loading dose. While the matrix rings of the present invention have in vivo the steady release rates associated with reservoir rings, they are easier and less expensive to manufacture. The present invention also provides methods of blocking DNA polymerization by an HIV reverse transcriptase enzyme, methods of preventing HIV infection in a female human, methods of treating HIV infection in a female human, and methods of preparing platinum-catalyzed intravaginal rings.


Patent
International Partnership For Microbicides | Date: 2014-11-13

The present invention provides improved intravaginal drug delivery devices, i.e., intravaginal rings, useful for the prophylactic administration of dapivirine in combination with either an antimicrobial compound or a contraceptive to a human. The present invention also provides methods of blocking DNA polymerization by an HIV reverse transcriptase enzyme, methods of preventing HIV infection in a female human, methods of treating HIV infection in a female human, methods of preventing unintended pregnancy in a female human, and methods of preparing intravaginal rings.

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