International Laboratory

Taipei, Taiwan

International Laboratory

Taipei, Taiwan
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.labdesignnews.com

Laboratory Design will be live-tweeting from the Laboratory Design Conference in Raleigh. Want to see what's going on at the show? It's easy! Follow us on Twitter @labdesignnews, and use the hashtag #2017LDC to follow along or to tag yourself/your firm if you'll be attending the conference. We will be tweeting information about the speaker sessions, workshops, discussion panels and speaker bios. Additionally, we will reveal the winners of our annual Laboratory of the Year awards as soon as they are announced to the public. We'll also be posting photos of presentations and laboratory tours. If you'll be attending the conference, follow us on Twitter and use our special #2017LDC hashtag to let us know what you're up to! If you couldn't make it this year, check out what's going on and stay tuned to our Twitter feed and our website for news about the 2018 Laboratory Design Conference, as well as our inaugural International Laboratory Design Conference in Madrid this September!


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.labdesignnews.com

Laboratory Design was live-tweeting from the 2017 Laboratory Design Conference in Raleigh. Attendees and companies were also able to comment on their experience by using the hashtag #2017LDC. (Click the link to view tweets from both Laboratory Design and conference attendees.) Below, check out some of our most-viewed tweets from the conference! For the latest on design and construction undertakings, New Projects, products, and how to contribute editorial content to Laboratory Design—and to stay tuned for information about the 2018 Laboratory Design Conference (#2018LDC), as well as our inaugural International Laboratory Design Conference in Madrid this fall—follow us on Twitter at  !


Receive press releases from Laboratory Testing Inc.: By Email Laboratory Testing Inc. Will Feature Material Testing Services at Power-Gen International Laboratory Testing Inc. will feature material testing services for the power generation industry in Booth 5214 during Power-Gen International. The Expo is being held in Orlando, FL from December 13th to 15th, 2016. Philadelphia, PA, December 03, 2016 --( Lab Testing has been attending Power-Gen since 2004. This year, attendees can visit LTI in Booth 5214 at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, FL on December 13 - 15, 2016. Laboratory Testing is one of the largest independent testing laboratories located in the USA. The Lab is regularly audited and approved by representative members of NIAC (Nuclear Industry Assessment Committee) and NUPIC (Nuclear Procurement Issues Committee). The company is also an approved vendor for many other suppliers and manufacturers in the power generation industry. LTI fulfills nuclear industry quality requirements with strict internal procedures and a quality system meeting 10CFR50 Appendix B and ASME NQA-1. Director of New Business Development, Mike Hiller, explains that “LTI supports companies in many types of power generation, including nuclear, oil and gas, and renewable energy. Our testing services provide much needed answers about raw materials and finished parts that are relied on for the safe, reliable operation of power sites, from qualification of elements, material identification, corrosion resistance, mechanical properties, flaws and inconsistencies, to even the root cause of a failure to prevent a recurrence.” Hiller will be one of the LTI team members available in Booth 5214 to discuss materials testing during the Power-Gen event. Power-Gen International is one of five co-located events covering every aspect of the power generation industry that will be held during Power Generation Week. Renewable Energy World International, Nuclear Power International, Coal-Gen, and GenForum are also held simultaneously. Power Generation Week will bring together over 20,000 attendees, 1,400 exhibiting suppliers and service companies and 70 conference sessions at the Orlando, FL event. About Laboratory Testing Inc. -- Laboratory Testing Inc. (LTI) of Hatfield, PA is a family-owned independent testing and metrology laboratory in business since 1984. The laboratory offers materials testing and analysis services including mechanical, chemical, metallurgical and corrosion testing, as well as nondestructive testing, root cause failure analysis, calibration services, dimensional inspection and test specimen machining. All test and inspection results are provided in certified reports. The laboratory specializes in metal and polymer testing, but also analyzes powdered metals, ores, ferroalloys, composites and ceramics. LTI is accredited by the PRI Nadcap program in materials and nondestructive testing and by A2LA to ISO/IEC 17025 for mechanical, metallurgical and chemical testing, dimensional inspection and calibration services. LTI Metrology, a division of Laboratory Testing Inc., provides dimensional inspection services and NIST-traceable calibration services for measuring hand tools, masters and a wide-range of measuring instruments and equipment. On-site calibration, repairs, new instruments and replacement parts are offered. Information on Laboratory Testing services and accreditations is available at www.labtesting.com, sales@labtesting.com or 800-219-9095. Philadelphia, PA, December 03, 2016 --( PR.com )-- Laboratory Testing Inc. (LTI) is scheduled to exhibit at Power-Gen International with a display of material testing services, including chemical analysis, mechanical testing, fracture mechanics, nondestructive testing and many other services. Testing provides important information for choosing materials, evaluating heat treatments and analyzing parts that fail or are in need of repair at power plants. The Lab offers all the testing required for upgrading existing power generation sites and utilizing unqualified source material. Test specimens and samples for destructive testing are prepared by the Machine Shop at LTI.Lab Testing has been attending Power-Gen since 2004. This year, attendees can visit LTI in Booth 5214 at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, FL on December 13 - 15, 2016.Laboratory Testing is one of the largest independent testing laboratories located in the USA. The Lab is regularly audited and approved by representative members of NIAC (Nuclear Industry Assessment Committee) and NUPIC (Nuclear Procurement Issues Committee). The company is also an approved vendor for many other suppliers and manufacturers in the power generation industry. LTI fulfills nuclear industry quality requirements with strict internal procedures and a quality system meeting 10CFR50 Appendix B and ASME NQA-1.Director of New Business Development, Mike Hiller, explains that “LTI supports companies in many types of power generation, including nuclear, oil and gas, and renewable energy. Our testing services provide much needed answers about raw materials and finished parts that are relied on for the safe, reliable operation of power sites, from qualification of elements, material identification, corrosion resistance, mechanical properties, flaws and inconsistencies, to even the root cause of a failure to prevent a recurrence.” Hiller will be one of the LTI team members available in Booth 5214 to discuss materials testing during the Power-Gen event.Power-Gen International is one of five co-located events covering every aspect of the power generation industry that will be held during Power Generation Week. Renewable Energy World International, Nuclear Power International, Coal-Gen, and GenForum are also held simultaneously. Power Generation Week will bring together over 20,000 attendees, 1,400 exhibiting suppliers and service companies and 70 conference sessions at the Orlando, FL event.About Laboratory Testing Inc. -- Laboratory Testing Inc. (LTI) of Hatfield, PA is a family-owned independent testing and metrology laboratory in business since 1984. The laboratory offers materials testing and analysis services including mechanical, chemical, metallurgical and corrosion testing, as well as nondestructive testing, root cause failure analysis, calibration services, dimensional inspection and test specimen machining. All test and inspection results are provided in certified reports. The laboratory specializes in metal and polymer testing, but also analyzes powdered metals, ores, ferroalloys, composites and ceramics. LTI is accredited by the PRI Nadcap program in materials and nondestructive testing and by A2LA to ISO/IEC 17025 for mechanical, metallurgical and chemical testing, dimensional inspection and calibration services. LTI Metrology, a division of Laboratory Testing Inc., provides dimensional inspection services and NIST-traceable calibration services for measuring hand tools, masters and a wide-range of measuring instruments and equipment. On-site calibration, repairs, new instruments and replacement parts are offered. Information on Laboratory Testing services and accreditations is available at www.labtesting.com, sales@labtesting.com or 800-219-9095. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Laboratory Testing Inc.


News Article | October 26, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The tests results of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), which often informs the development of academic policies in various countries, often receive rather simplified interpretations. As such, analysis of PISA data does not reflect the entire 'package' of school students' knowledge in one key area - mathematics. This is the opinion of researchers from National Research University Higher School of Economics (Russia), Stanford University (USA), and Michigan State University (USA). The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is the leading authority currently monitoring PISA educational assessments (since 2000). This process can uncover changes and developments in various education systems throughout the world, while also evaluating the effectiveness of strategic decision-making with respect to education. However, this type of analysis does not include data on teachers and the 'educational histories' of children and youth. Thus, the results of the OECD's monitoring may be inaccurately interpreted, thus hindering countries' ability to properly develop and establish educational policies. The PISA measures the knowledge of 15-year old students in mathematics and the natural sciences, as well as their ability to work with various types of text. However, according to researchers in Russia and the USA, this monitoring can only provide a 'snapshot' of the knowledge of such students and, thus, does not consider earlier assessments of their abilities and grades, as well as the conditions affecting one's education (e.g., the cultural standards and progress of an entire class, the education level of a student's parents, a teacher's professional abilities and qualifications, etc.). At the same time, all of these factors may influence the movement (up or down) of the grades on the PISA. Furthermore, the researchers cited the results of math tests, which showed that such additional factors can significantly alter the conclusions drawn from the OECD's monitoring data. During math tests, students usually must solve three types of problem. The most important for PISA evaluations are assignments in applied mathematics (e.g., with real-life applications such as measuring a frame for a photograph). A large amount of attention is paid to 'real life' problems since PISA tests aim to determine the depth of students' ability to apply their knowledge in order to solve essential problems. The second type of assignment is text-based problems with a large amount of additional information. In order to solve such problems, students must read through the text, determine what is most important, and then quickly adapt to the unfamiliar format of the given question. The third type are 'formal' mathematical problems (algebra and geometry), which require the application of complex formulas. PISA tests pay less attention to such problems, even though 'formal' mathematics are much more difficult than applied mathematics, often elevating mathematical thinking to an entirely new level. Furthermore, those students more often engaged in solving such problems usually have better PISA results that those whose teachers tend to focus on practical 'real life' examples. In addition, the cultural sophistication of a student's family is a key factor (e.g., standard of living, linguistic abilities, what is done in their leisure time, etc.). Students from better educated families with access to many books at home usually show the best test results. Also, such students have the conditions in place enabling them to excel academically. At the same time, classes with many students from educated families are more likely to acquire the skills necessary to solve formal algebraic and geometrical tasks, and thus are able to succeed in PISA testing. Better qualified teachers can be found in classes where there is a higher average level of culture, and, as such, they tend to give their students more assignments dealing with formal mathematics. During their analysis, researchers also discovered that teachers with a mathematical non-pedagogical background tend to give better instruction, thus helping to boost the average grades of high school seniors. Thus, best suited for PISA test are those learners who have successfully mastered formal mathematics. The researchers stress that cramming for questions on PISA tests are simply not enough. Thus, in order to ensure a more objective assessment of students' knowledge and abilities in international monitoring, the factors influencing their success should be considered more fully. At the same time, in its recommendations, the OECD overestimates the role of schools in enhancing academic achievements, but underestimates other 'areas of influence' affecting evaluations of students' knowledge. The results of this analysis were published in the article 'Revisiting the Relationship Between International Assessment Outcomes and Educational Production: Evidence From a Longitudinal PISA-TIMSS Sample' http://aer. in the American Educational Research Journal. The article's authors include: Andrey Zakharov (Deputy Head of the HSE Institute of Education/International Laboratory for Education Policy Analysis), Martin Cornoy (Academic Supervisor, Leading Research Fellow at the HSE Institute of Education/International Laboratory for Education Policy Analysis, distinguished Professor of Stanford University), Tatiana Khavenson (Research Fellow at the HSE Institute of Education/International Laboratory for Education Policy Analysis), Prashant Loyalka (Professor at Stanford University) and William H. Schmidt (distinguished professor at Michigan State University).


News Article | January 7, 2016
Site: www.treehugger.com

These scientists say that respecting and understanding plants and trees is essential for our future. We humans have a wide range of feelings about members of the kingdom Plantae, from total disregard to thinking they are clever friends. Given that this is TreeHugger, we lean toward, at the very least, wanting to give them a big embrace. But what does science have to say about our botanical cohabitants? This is what the BBC World Service Inquiry program wondered when they asked four scientists what they thought about plants. Here’s the takeaway: 1. Plants could be cognitive and intelligent Professor Stefano Mancuso runs the International Laboratory for Plant Neurobiology at the University of Florence. In an experiment with two climbing plants, they found that both competed for a single support when it was placed between them. The plant that didn’t make it to the pole first immediately “sensed” the other plant had succeeded and started to find an alternative. “This was astonishing and it demonstrates the plants were aware of their physical environment and the behavior of the other plant. In animals we call this consciousness. We are convinced that plants are cognitive and intelligent.” 2. They're all brain; and we're dependent on them Mancuso continues, "Plants distribute all along the body the functions that in animals are concentrated in single organs. Whereas in animals almost the only cells producing electrical signals are in the brain, the plant is a kind of distributed brain in which almost every cell is able to produce them." Underestimating plants can be very dangerous, he says, "because our life depends on plants and our actions are destroying their environments." 3. They could be sentient beings Professor of forest ecology in the department of forest and conservation sciences at the University of British Columbia, Suzanne Simard talks about the ways in which trees are linked together underground. She has studied this "wood wide web" and says that trees communicate with each other and then behave in certain ways. "We grew Douglas fir in a neighborhood of strangers and its own kin and found that they can recognise their own kin and we also grew Douglas fir and ponderosa pine together. We injured the Douglas fir by pulling its needles off [aww], and by attacking it with western spruce bud worm [ouch], and it then sent a lot of carbon in its network into the neighboring ponderosa pine. My interpretation was the Douglas fir knew it was dying and wanted to pass its legacy of carbon on to its neighbor, because that would be beneficial for the associated fungi and the community.” Simard says that we should shift our thinking and change our attitude which would be beneficial for our forests. "We haven't treated them with respect that they are sentient beings.” 4. They can help us better understand nature to advance our future Dr. Barbara Mazzolai is the coordinator at the Centre for Micro-BioRobotics at the Italian Institute of Technology. She uses plants as a biomimetic starting point to design robots. So smart. She says they can use a plant-inspired robot for environmental monitoring, space applications or rescue under debris, "because it can adapt to the environment like a natural system. The robot doesn't have a predefined structure, but can create on the basis of need." "Medical robotics could also be a key application," she adds. "We could develop new endoscopes that are soft and able to grow inside living human tissues without damage. Plants are underestimated. They move under the soil and it's difficult to understand the behavior of these systems. But they have features that can really help us understand nature." 5. Their ability to adapt is crucial for us to learn from Professor Daniel Chamovitz, the Dean of Life Sciences at Tel Aviv University pulls back from declaring that plants are smart. "Anyone who claims they're studying plant 'intelligence' is either trying to be very controversial or is on the borderline of pseudoscience,” he says. But he admits they are exquisitely aware of their environment and how to adapt to that … and understanding them is important for our survival. "There's information being exchanged between roots and leaves and flowers and pollinators and the environment all the time. The plant is making 'decisions' – should I change 10 degrees to the left, five degrees to the right? Is it time to flower now? Is enough water available?” Chamovitz says that in our modern environment – with its global warming, changes in precipitation, and shifting populations – we need to learn from plants about how they respond to their environment and then adapt. "We've completely underestimated plants. We look at them as inanimate objects, completely unaware of the amazing, complex biology that allows that plant to survive." If we don’t learn from them, he says, “we might find ourselves in a big problem 50 to 100 years from now.”


News Article | December 15, 2015
Site: phys.org

Fighting large-scale fires usually involves firefighting foams based on synthetic substances, such as prefluorinated surfactants, that, despite their effectiveness, are extremely toxic for living organisms. Complete biodegradation of such foams can last for more than 200 years, with residues quickly penetrating deep into soil and surface water. This leads to the accumulation of toxic elements in living organisms, such as plants, animals and men. Many countries have declined the use of such fire extinguishing agents or opted for reducing the production of such substances despite the absence of any decent alternatives. A group of scientists from the International Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Technologies (SCAMT) at ITMO University in Saint Petersburg and research company SOPOT devised a foam with full biodegradability and whose fire extinguishing capacity is higher than that of any existing analogue currently in use by fire fighters. After the fire is extinguished, the substance actively absorbs water, softens and falls apart into bioinert silica particles. And even when the foam accidentally enters living organisms, it does not not pose any danger to them. "Our foam is based on silica nanoparticles, which create a polymer network when exposed to air," says Alexander Vinogradov, deputy head of the SCAMT laboratory. "Such a network embraces and adheres to the burning object and momentarily cools it down. At the same time, the foam itself hardens. The inorganic origin of this polymer network allows it to resist temperatures above 1000 degrees Celsius, which ensures gigantic stability from the aggressive environment in the midst of a raging fire." "Most existing foams are made of organic materials and quickly deteriorate when temperature approaches 300 degrees Celsius. In our case, the foam creates a hard frame that not only puts out the fire, but also protects the object from re-ignition. With ordinary foams, re-ignition occurs within seconds after flame is applied to the object again." The scientists conducted a series of large-scale experiments of the hardening foam, including the imitation of an actual forest fire. The foam was used to create a flame retardant belt that was supposed stop the spread of the fire. The tests demonstrated that the foam easily localizes the forest fire seat and can stay active during the whole fire season. "The flame retardant belt made of our foam will prevent the spread of any forest fire, regardless of its strength and level of complexity," says Gennady Kuprin, head of SOPOT. "We can localize the fire and be sure that the adjacent territories will be safe. This is crucial to organize evacuation works during forest fires, where 9 of 10 people die in our and other countries." Explore further: Novel coatings show great promise as flame retardants in polyurethane foam More information: Alexander V. Vinogradov et al. Silica foams for fire prevention and firefighting, ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces (2015). DOI: 10.1021/acsami.5b08653


News Article | February 3, 2016
Site: www.materialstoday.com

A group of researchers from Russia, Australia and the Netherlands has developed a technology that can reduce magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning times by more than 50%, allowing hospitals to drastically increase the number of scans without changing their equipment. This extraordinary leap in efficiency is achieved by placing a layer of metamaterials onto the bed of the scanner, thereby improving the signal-to-noise ratio. The details of this research appear in a paper in Advanced Materials. This patent-pending technology is currently being co-developed by MediWise, a UK company that specializes in commercializing metamaterials for medical applications. MRI scanning is a commonly-used analytical technique in medicine, biology and neurology for monitoring subtle physiological changes in internal organs. For instance, a timely MRI procedure can detect tissues affected by cancer at the earliest stage of the disease. However, effective MRI diagnostics depends almost entirely on the quality of the resulting MRI images. Now, the group of Russian, Australian and Dutch researchers has demonstrated that the quality of MRI images can be substantially increased with the aid of metamaterials – artificial periodic structures that can interact with electromagnetic radiation in an extraordinary fashion. "This is the first real demonstration of the practical potential of metamaterials for MRI imaging enhancement and scanning time reduction, " says Yuri Kivshar, head of the Nonlinear Physics Centre at the Australian National University in Canberra, and co-author of the paper. "Our research may evolve into new healthcare applications and commercial products." By placing a specially-designed metamaterial comprising an array of metallic wires under the object being studied in an MRI scanner, the researchers showed that it is possible to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in the scanned area. This means that, compared to an ordinary MRI scanner, either a higher resolution image can be obtained over the same scanning time or an image with the same resolution can be obtained in a shorter time. In addition, the metamaterial is able to suppress the electric field that can cause tissue heating – a phenomenon that may compromise the safety of the whole MRI procedure. This problem has recently become even more pressing with the arrival of high-field and ultra-high-field MRI scanners for medical applications. These high-field MRI scanners can produce higher-resolution images but at the expense of greater tissue heating. By using the metamaterial, however, the scientific group managed to avoid tissue heating entirely, while still preserving high resolution. Furthermore, this approach does not require making any changes to the hardware of the MRI scanner; instead, it utilizes an inexpensive functional add-on device that can be used with any existing MRI scanner. "Our metamaterial can be embedded directly into the patient table of any commercially available MRI scanner. However, in the future we see even more potential in the concept of special smart clothing for MRI scanning," says Alexey Slobozhanyuk, first author of the paper and a researcher at the International Laboratory of Applied Radiophysics at ITMO University in St Petersburg, Russia. "Stripes of our metamaterial can be sewn in the clothes. The examination of patients, wearing such clothes, would lead to higher resolution MRI images, while the special design will enable a homogeneous enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio, which does not pose any risk to the patients' health. As a result, with metamaterials you will be able to improve the characteristics of low-field MRI to the extent that their functionality is comparable to high-field MRI." The duration of an MRI exam can also prove problematic for patients. In ordinary MRI devices, the scanning may last from 15 to 60 minutes, and during this time the patient must remain completely still. The possibility of achieving detailed images in a shorter time will make the procedure more convenient for the patient and could also reduce queue times in hospitals. "Our idea of using metamaterials in order to receive images with higher detailization will allow doctors to localize and study oncological diseases, " says Kivshar. "Based on the images obtained with an MRI scanner, the surgeon determines the structure of the inflammation, which afterwards will serve as a blueprint for his scalpel during the operation." "Metamaterials have been proven to add value through their ability to process electromagnetic and sound waves in ways that no natural material can do," comments George Palikaras, founder and CEO of MediWise. "This leads to emerging business opportunities creating genuinely disruptive products. The scientific field of metamaterials is rapidly evolving and impacting traditional industries such as aerospace, telecoms, cleantech and now healthcare. The technology has the potential to extend the life of MRI imaging machines but, more importantly, it will make the scan quicker, more accurate and safer to patients. We are honored to work alongside world-leading academic partners, and to help advance this important innovation from the laboratory to the marketplace." This story is adapted from material from ITMO University, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier. Link to original source.


News Article | January 15, 2016
Site: phys.org

A group of researchers from Russia, Australia and the Netherlands has developed a technology that can reduce magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning times by more than 50 percent, allowing hospitals to drastically increase the number of scans without changing equipment. This extraordinary leap in efficiency is achieved by placing a layer of metamaterials on the bed of the scanner, which improves the signal-to-noise ratio. The details of this experimental research are available in the current issue of Advanced Materials. This patent-pending technology is currently being co-developed by MediWise, a U.K.-based company that specializes in commercializing metamaterials for medical applications. MRI is one of the key methods of modern diagnostics that have found wide applications in medicine, biology and neurology. MRI scanning helps monitor the subtlest of physiological changes in our internal organs. For instance, a timely MRI procedure can detect tissues affected by cancer in the earliest stage of the disease. The possibility of effective MRI diagnostics, however, depends almost entirely on the quality of resulting MRI images. Scientists have now demonstrated that the quality of MRI images is substantially increased with the aid of metamaterials—artificial periodic structures that can interact with electromagnetic radiation in an extraordinary fashion. "This is the first real demonstration of the practical potential of metamaterials for MRI imaging enhancement and scanning time reduction. Our research may evolve into new healthcare applications and commercial products," says Yuri Kivshar, co-author of the study and head of the Nonlinear Physics Centre at the Australian National University. By placing a specially designed metamaterial under the studied object in an MRI scanner, it is possible to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in the scanned area. The result of this increase is that either a higher resolution image can be obtained over the same time slot or faster examination can be performed with the same resolution as an ordinary MRI scanner. In addition, the metamaterial suppresses the electric field, which is responsible for tissue heating—a phenomenon that may compromise the safety of the whole MRI procedure. The problem of tissue heating has recently become even more relevant with the arrival of high-field and ultra-high-field MRI scanners in medical practice. A drive for high-field MRI is mediated by the benefits of better image resolution. However, tissue heating becomes substantial at higher fields due to an increase of the radiofrequency energy absorption. Therefore, the issue of safety in high-field and ultra-high-field MRI scanners remains open. The scientific group managed to entirely avoid tissue heating, at the same time preserving high resolution. The solution, in essence, does not require any intervention in the hardware of the MRI scanner, but rather represents an inexpensive, functional add-on device that can be used with any existing MRI scanner. "Our metamaterial can be embedded directly into the patient table of any commercially available MRI scanner. However, in the future, we see even more potential in the concept of special smart clothing for MRI scanning," says Alexey Slobozhanyuk, first author of the study and researcher at the International Laboratory of Applied Radiophysics at ITMO University. "Stripes of our metamaterial can be sewn in the clothes. The examination of patients wearing such clothes would lead to higher resolution MRI images, while the special design will enable a homogeneous enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio, which does not pose any risk to the patients' health. As a result, with metamaterials, you will be able to improve the characteristics of low-field MRI to the extent that their functionality is comparable to high-field MRI." The duration of an MRI exam also presumes inconveniences for patients. In ordinary MRI devices, the scanning may last from 15 to 60 minutes, and during this time, the patient must remain completely immobile. The possibility of achieving detailed images in a shorter time period makes the procedure more comfortable for the patient, and in the long view, could even reduce queue time in hospitals. "Our idea of using metamaterials in order to receive images with higher detail will allow doctors to localize and study oncological diseases. Based on the images obtained with an MRI scanner, the surgeon determines the structure of the inflammation, which afterwards will serve as a blueprint for his scalpel during the operation," says Yuri Kivshar. "Metamaterials have been proven to add value through their ability to process electromagnetic and sound waves in ways that no natural material can do. This leads to emerging business opportunities, creating genuinely disruptive products. The scientific field of metamaterials in rapidly evolving and impacting traditional industries such as aerospace, telecoms, clean tech and now health care, " says George Palikaras, Mediwise's founder and CEO. "The technology has the potential to extend the life of MRI imaging machines but more importantly, it will make the scan quicker, more accurate and safer to patients. We are honoured to work alongside world-leading academic partners, and to help advance this important innovation from the laboratory to the marketplace." Explore further: Portable MRI named Top 10 Breakthrough of 2015 by Physics World magazine More information: Alexey P. Slobozhanyuk et al. Enhancement of Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Metasurfaces, Advanced Materials (2016). DOI: 10.1002/adma.201504270


This report studies Laboratory Mill in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering Alexanderwerk CapsulCN International F.P.S. Food and Pharma Systems srl Fluid Air FOSS RETSCH Torontech Group International Vanguard Pharmaceutical Machinery QIAGEN Lake Constance The Fitzpatrick Company View Full Report With Complete TOC, List Of Figure and Table: http://globalqyresearch.com/global-laboratory-mill-market-research-report-2016 Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with production, consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate of Laboratory Mill in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like North America Europe China Japan Southeast Asia India Split by product type, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into Type I Type II Type III Split by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Laboratory Mill in each application, can be divided into Application 1 Application 2 Application 3 Global Laboratory Mill Market Research Report 2016 1 Laboratory Mill Market Overview 1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Laboratory Mill 1.2 Laboratory Mill Segment by Type 1.2.1 Global Production Market Share of Laboratory Mill by Type in 2015 1.2.2 Type I 1.2.3 Type II 1.2.4 Type III 1.3 Laboratory Mill Segment by Application 1.3.1 Laboratory Mill Consumption Market Share by Application in 2015 1.3.2 Application 1 1.3.3 Application 2 1.3.4 Application 3 1.4 Laboratory Mill Market by Region 1.4.1 North America Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.2 Europe Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.3 China Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.4 Japan Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.5 Southeast Asia Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.6 India Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.5 Global Market Size (Value) of Laboratory Mill (2011-2021) 7 Global Laboratory Mill Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis 7.1 Alexanderwerk 7.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.1.2 Laboratory Mill Product Type, Application and Specification 7.1.2.1 Type I 7.1.2.2 Type II 7.1.3 Alexanderwerk Laboratory Mill Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.2 CapsulCN International 7.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.2.2 Laboratory Mill Product Type, Application and Specification 7.2.2.1 Type I 7.2.2.2 Type II 7.2.3 CapsulCN International Laboratory Mill Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.3 F.P.S. Food and Pharma Systems srl 7.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.3.2 Laboratory Mill Product Type, Application and Specification 7.3.2.1 Type I 7.3.2.2 Type II 7.3.3 F.P.S. Food and Pharma Systems srl Laboratory Mill Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.4 Fluid Air 7.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.4.2 Laboratory Mill Product Type, Application and Specification 7.4.2.1 Type I 7.4.2.2 Type II 7.4.3 Fluid Air Laboratory Mill Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.5 FOSS 7.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.5.2 Laboratory Mill Product Type, Application and Specification 7.5.2.1 Type I 7.5.2.2 Type II 7.5.3 FOSS Laboratory Mill Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.5.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.6 RETSCH 7.6.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.6.2 Laboratory Mill Product Type, Application and Specification 7.6.2.1 Type I 7.6.2.2 Type II 7.6.3 RETSCH Laboratory Mill Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.6.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.7 Torontech Group International 7.7.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.7.2 Laboratory Mill Product Type, Application and Specification 7.7.2.1 Type I 7.7.2.2 Type II 7.7.3 Torontech Group International Laboratory Mill Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.7.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.8 Vanguard Pharmaceutical Machinery 7.8.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.8.2 Laboratory Mill Product Type, Application and Specification 7.8.2.1 Type I 7.8.2.2 Type II 7.8.3 Vanguard Pharmaceutical Machinery Laboratory Mill Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.8.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.9 QIAGEN Lake Constance 7.9.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.9.2 Laboratory Mill Product Type, Application and Specification 7.9.2.1 Type I 7.9.2.2 Type II 7.9.3 QIAGEN Lake Constance Laboratory Mill Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.9.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.10 The Fitzpatrick Company 7.10.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.10.2 Laboratory Mill Product Type, Application and Specification 7.10.2.1 Type I 7.10.2.2 Type II 7.10.3 The Fitzpatrick Company Laboratory Mill Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.10.4 Main Business/Business Overview Global QYResearch ( http://globalqyresearch.com/ ) is the one spot destination for all your research needs. Global QYResearch holds the repository of quality research reports from numerous publishers across the globe. Our inventory of research reports caters to various industry verticals including Healthcare, Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Technology and Media, Chemicals, Materials, Energy, Heavy Industry, etc. With the complete information about the publishers and the industries they cater to for developing market research reports, we help our clients in making purchase decision by understanding their requirements and suggesting best possible collection matching their needs.


This report studies Laboratory Mill in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering Alexanderwerk CapsulCN International F.P.S. Food and Pharma Systems srl Fluid Air FOSS RETSCH Torontech Group International Vanguard Pharmaceutical Machinery QIAGEN Lake Constance The Fitzpatrick Company View Full Report With Complete TOC, List Of Figure and Table: http://globalqyresearch.com/global-laboratory-mill-market-research-report-2016 Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with production, consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate of Laboratory Mill in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like North America Europe China Japan Southeast Asia India Split by product type, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into Type I Type II Type III Split by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Laboratory Mill in each application, can be divided into Application 1 Application 2 Application 3 Global Laboratory Mill Market Research Report 2016 1 Laboratory Mill Market Overview 1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Laboratory Mill 1.2 Laboratory Mill Segment by Type 1.2.1 Global Production Market Share of Laboratory Mill by Type in 2015 1.2.2 Type I 1.2.3 Type II 1.2.4 Type III 1.3 Laboratory Mill Segment by Application 1.3.1 Laboratory Mill Consumption Market Share by Application in 2015 1.3.2 Application 1 1.3.3 Application 2 1.3.4 Application 3 1.4 Laboratory Mill Market by Region 1.4.1 North America Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.2 Europe Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.3 China Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.4 Japan Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.5 Southeast Asia Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.6 India Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.5 Global Market Size (Value) of Laboratory Mill (2011-2021) 7 Global Laboratory Mill Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis 7.1 Alexanderwerk 7.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.1.2 Laboratory Mill Product Type, Application and Specification 7.1.2.1 Type I 7.1.2.2 Type II 7.1.3 Alexanderwerk Laboratory Mill Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.2 CapsulCN International 7.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.2.2 Laboratory Mill Product Type, Application and Specification 7.2.2.1 Type I 7.2.2.2 Type II 7.2.3 CapsulCN International Laboratory Mill Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.3 F.P.S. Food and Pharma Systems srl 7.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.3.2 Laboratory Mill Product Type, Application and Specification 7.3.2.1 Type I 7.3.2.2 Type II 7.3.3 F.P.S. Food and Pharma Systems srl Laboratory Mill Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.4 Fluid Air 7.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.4.2 Laboratory Mill Product Type, Application and Specification 7.4.2.1 Type I 7.4.2.2 Type II 7.4.3 Fluid Air Laboratory Mill Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.5 FOSS 7.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.5.2 Laboratory Mill Product Type, Application and Specification 7.5.2.1 Type I 7.5.2.2 Type II 7.5.3 FOSS Laboratory Mill Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.5.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.6 RETSCH 7.6.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.6.2 Laboratory Mill Product Type, Application and Specification 7.6.2.1 Type I 7.6.2.2 Type II 7.6.3 RETSCH Laboratory Mill Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.6.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.7 Torontech Group International 7.7.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.7.2 Laboratory Mill Product Type, Application and Specification 7.7.2.1 Type I 7.7.2.2 Type II 7.7.3 Torontech Group International Laboratory Mill Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.7.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.8 Vanguard Pharmaceutical Machinery 7.8.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.8.2 Laboratory Mill Product Type, Application and Specification 7.8.2.1 Type I 7.8.2.2 Type II 7.8.3 Vanguard Pharmaceutical Machinery Laboratory Mill Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.8.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.9 QIAGEN Lake Constance 7.9.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.9.2 Laboratory Mill Product Type, Application and Specification 7.9.2.1 Type I 7.9.2.2 Type II 7.9.3 QIAGEN Lake Constance Laboratory Mill Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.9.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.10 The Fitzpatrick Company 7.10.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.10.2 Laboratory Mill Product Type, Application and Specification 7.10.2.1 Type I 7.10.2.2 Type II 7.10.3 The Fitzpatrick Company Laboratory Mill Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.10.4 Main Business/Business Overview Global QYResearch ( http://globalqyresearch.com/ ) is the one spot destination for all your research needs. Global QYResearch holds the repository of quality research reports from numerous publishers across the globe. Our inventory of research reports caters to various industry verticals including Healthcare, Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Technology and Media, Chemicals, Materials, Energy, Heavy Industry, etc. With the complete information about the publishers and the industries they cater to for developing market research reports, we help our clients in making purchase decision by understanding their requirements and suggesting best possible collection matching their needs.

Loading International Laboratory collaborators
Loading International Laboratory collaborators