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Merono-Penuela A.,VU University Amsterdam | Ashkpour A.,International Institute of Social History | Van Erp M.,VU University Amsterdam | Mandemakers K.,International Institute of Social History | And 4 more authors.
Semantic Web | Year: 2014

During the nineties of the last century, historians and computer scientists created together a research agenda around the life cycle of historical information. It comprised the tasks of creation, design, enrichment, editing, retrieval, analysis and presentation of historical information with help of information technology. They also identified a number of problems and challenges in this field, some of them closely related to semantics and meaning. In this survey paper we study the joint work of historians and computer scientists in the use of Semantic Web methods and technologies in historical research. We analyse to what extent these contributions help in solving the open problems in the agenda of historians, and we describe open challenges and possible lines of research pushing further a still young, but promising, historical Semantic Web. © 2015 - IOS Press and the authors.


Looijesteijn H.,International Institute of Social History | van Leeuwen M.H.D.,University Utrecht
Scandinavian Economic History Review | Year: 2014

In this contribution, we study the founding of large charities for the elderly during the Dutch Republic, demonstrating their number and nature, with an emphasis on how almshouses for the elderly were intricately bound up with the concern to preserve honour. Personal honour, being tied to community honour, formed a vital part of the processes of patronage and corporatism that defined early modern Dutch society. Through almshouse foundations the religious and civic communities to which patrons and clients belonged were strengthened. Within the fragmented religious landscape of the Dutch Republic these charities played an important role in strengthening both mainstream and dissenter communities, while providing a decent old age to Dutch citizens. © 2014 © 2014 Taylor & Francis.


Van Poppel F.,Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute | Bijwaard G.E.,Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute | Ekamper P.,Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute | Mandemakers K.,International Institute of Social History
Biodemography and Social Biology | Year: 2012

In this article, we study temporal, regional, and social variation in infant and childhood death clustering in The Netherlands, using data from three provinces. The data relate to children born in 90,000 marriages contracted between the beginning and the last quarter of the nineteenth century. Descriptive indicators show that death clustering was more frequent in the province of Zeeland and more common in the lower classes, and that it increased in two provinces over time. Shared frailty hazard models make it clear that the number of children who died before the birth of an index child had a negative effect on the mortality of index children, whereas earlier stillbirths and the number of children who died when the index child was at a young age had an increasing effect on the mortality of index children. © 2012 Copyright Society for Biodemography and Social Biology.


Merono-Penuela A.,VU University Amsterdam | Ashkpour A.,International Institute of Social History | Gueret C.,Data Archiving and Networked Services
CEUR Workshop Proceedings | Year: 2014

RDF Data Cube allows the modeling and publishing of Linked Statistical Data (LSD) in the Semantic Web. Often, variable values of such statistical data come in a non-standardized way and represented by too narrow, concrete or wrongly typed literals. Generally, adequate and standard concept schemes for such variables (especially in very specific domains like historical religious denominations, or building types in the pre-industrial era) do not exist and need to be created. This is a manual task that requires lots of expert knowledge and time investment. We present a workflow that combines hierarchical clustering and semantic tagging to automatically build concept schemes in a data-driven and bottom-up way, leveraging lexical and semantic properties of the non-standard dimension values. We apply our workflow in two different use-cases and discuss its usefulness, limitations and possible improvements.


De Beer H.,International Institute of Social History
Economics and Human Biology | Year: 2012

The positive relationship between per capita availability of dairy products and average height found in historical studies (for instance in nineteenth century Bavaria, Prussia and France; Baten, 2009) does not necessarily indicate a causal relationship. Historical studies usually apply non-experimental methods that may produce substantial bias. Modern experimental controlled studies may provide high quality evidence supporting a causal relationship between consumption of dairy products and physical growth. This paper provides a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials investigating the effect of supplementing usual diet with dairy products on physical growth. Twelve studies provided sufficient, independent data for meta-analysis. Seven studies were conducted since the 1990s. The other studies were conducted between 1926 and 1980. Studies were conducted in Europe, USA, China, Northern Vietnam, Kenya, Indonesia and India. Many studies had some internal validity problems such as lack of randomisation or dissimilarity of groups at baseline regarding height and age, which affects the quality of evidence. Meta-analysis and sensitivity analysis showed that the most likely effect of dairy products supplementation is 0.4 cm per annum additional growth per ca 245 ml of milk daily. Meta-regression analysis indicated that milk might have more effect on growth than other dairy products while lower height-for-age and being a teenager increased the effect of supplementation. In conclusion, there is moderate quality evidence that dairy products supplementation stimulate linear growth supporting hypotheses that changing levels of consumption of dairy products in the 19th and 20th centuries contributed to trends in height. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


De Vito C.G.,International Institute of Social History
International Journal of Law and Psychiatry | Year: 2014

This article addresses the long-standing continuities in the history of the Italian forensic psychiatric units and views them as the result of conflicting forces, interests, mentalities and strategies at the cross-road of forensic psychiatry, psychiatry, prison and health services. It focuses on the period from the 1960s to the present and deals with, among other issues, the long-term impact of the anti-asylum movements and the on-going debate on the 'phasing out' of the forensic psychiatric units. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Van Der Linden M.,International Institute of Social History
International Labor and Working-Class History | Year: 2012

The idea that the histories of different regions in the world are interconnected is not particularly novel; it already existed several centuries ago. Thus, for example, when the German historian and playwright Friedrich Schiller was granted a chair at the University of Jena in 1789, he declared in his inaugural address that the most remote regions of the world contribute to our luxury. After all, he continued, The clothes we wear, the spices in our food, and the price for which we buy them, many of our strongest medicines, and also many new tools of our destruction-do they not presuppose a Columbus who discovered America, a Vasco da Gama who circumnavigated the tip of Africa? 2 Nevertheless it took quite some time before professional historians began to consider these global connections seriously in their research. Colonial and imperial historians led the way. They were joined by economic historians. Labor historians became interested in intercontinental perspectives only more recently; until the 1970s, they typically locked themselves into the framework of individual nation-states. Even great innovators in the discipline, such as E. P. Thompson, thought mostly in terms of national working classes. © 2013 International Labor and Working-Class History, Inc.


PubMed | International Institute of Social History
Type: | Journal: Economics and human biology | Year: 2016

The physical stature of Surinamese soldiers is estimated to have increased by more than 3cm between 1870 and 1909. In the subsequent four decades, the increase in adult male and female height amounted to 0.3-0.5cm and 0.9-1.0cm per decade, respectively. This increase in height continued and accelerated during the second half of the twentieth century. Height increase among African and Hindustani Surinamese males and females was similar. Height differences between African and Hindustani Surinamese were therefore fairly constant over time, at 4-5cm. Other indicators of nutritional and health status, such as infant mortality, showed continuous improvement, whereas per capita calorie and protein availability improved in the twentieth century.


PubMed | International Institute of Social History
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Economics and human biology | Year: 2012

The positive relationship between per capita availability of dairy products and average height found in historical studies (for instance in nineteenth century Bavaria, Prussia and France; Baten, 2009) does not necessarily indicate a causal relationship. Historical studies usually apply non-experimental methods that may produce substantial bias. Modern experimental controlled studies may provide high quality evidence supporting a causal relationship between consumption of dairy products and physical growth. This paper provides a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials investigating the effect of supplementing usual diet with dairy products on physical growth. Twelve studies provided sufficient, independent data for meta-analysis. Seven studies were conducted since the 1990s. The other studies were conducted between 1926 and 1980. Studies were conducted in Europe, USA, China, Northern Vietnam, Kenya, Indonesia and India. Many studies had some internal validity problems such as lack of randomisation or dissimilarity of groups at baseline regarding height and age, which affects the quality of evidence. Meta-analysis and sensitivity analysis showed that the most likely effect of dairy products supplementation is 0.4 cm per annum additional growth per ca 245 ml of milk daily. Meta-regression analysis indicated that milk might have more effect on growth than other dairy products while lower height-for-age and being a teenager increased the effect of supplementation. In conclusion, there is moderate quality evidence that dairy products supplementation stimulate linear growth supporting hypotheses that changing levels of consumption of dairy products in the 19th and 20th centuries contributed to trends in height.


PubMed | International Institute of Social History
Type: Historical Article | Journal: International journal of law and psychiatry | Year: 2014

This article addresses the long-standing continuities in the history of the Italian forensic psychiatric units and views them as the result of conflicting forces, interests, mentalities and strategies at the cross-road of forensic psychiatry, psychiatry, prison and health services. It focuses on the period from the 1960s to the present and deals with, among other issues, the long-term impact of the anti-asylum movements and the on-going debate on the phasing out of the forensic psychiatric units.

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