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Osei F.B.,Kwame Nkrumah University Of Science And Technology | Duker A.A.,Kwame Nkrumah University Of Science And Technology | Augustijn E.-W.,International Institute of Geo Information Science and Earth Observation ITC | Stein A.,International Institute of Geo Information Science and Earth Observation ITC
International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation | Year: 2010

Cholera has been a public health burden in Ghana since the early 1970s. Between 1999 and 2005, a total of 25,636 cases and 620 deaths were officially reported to the WHO. In one of the worst affected urban cities, fecal contamination of surface water is extremely high, and the disease is reported to be prevalent among inhabitants living in close proximity to surface water bodies. Surface runoff from dump sites is a major source of fecal and bacterial contamination of rivers and streams in the study area. This study aims to determine (a) the impacts of surface water contamination on cholera infection and (b) detect and map arbitrary shaped clusters of cholera. A Geographic Information System (GIS) based spatial analysis is used to delineate potential reservoirs of the cholera vibrios; possibly contaminated by surface runoff from open space refuse dumps. Statistical modeling using OLS model reveals a significant negative association between (a) cholera prevalence and proximity to all the potential cholera reservoirs (R2 = 0.18, p < 0.001) and (b) cholera prevalence and proximity to upstream potential cholera reservoirs (R2 = 0.25, p < 0.001). The inclusion of spatial autoregressive coefficients in the OLS model reveals the dependency of the spatial distribution of cholera prevalence on the spatial neighbors of the communities. A flexible scan statistic identifies a most likely cluster with a higher relative risk (RR = 2.04, p < 0.01) compared with the cluster detected by circular scan statistic (RR = 1.60, p < 0.01). We conclude that surface water pollution through runoff from waste dump sites play a significant role in cholera infection. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Source


Shafique M.,International Institute of Geo Information Science and Earth Observation ITC | Shafique M.,University of Peshawar | van der Meijde M.,International Institute of Geo Information Science and Earth Observation ITC | Kerle N.,International Institute of Geo Information Science and Earth Observation ITC | van der Meer F.,International Institute of Geo Information Science and Earth Observation ITC
International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation | Year: 2011

The impact of topographic attributes on the uneven distribution of seismic response and associated devastation has frequently been observed and documented during seismic events, but has rarely been investigated at a regional scale. Existing numerical and experimental techniques applied to explore the impact of topographic attributes in the aggravation of seismic response, have been limited to isolated and/or synthetic hills and ridges. Predicting the realistic regional impact of topographic seismic response is strongly dependent on the resolution and accuracy of regional topographic information. This study evaluates the topographic attributes and seismic parameters computed from multi-resolution and source DEMs, to investigate the impact of data source and resolution on the derived topographic seismic response. Methodologies are developed to readily derive the spatial distribution of relevant topographic attributes and seismic parameters, utilizing the multi-resolution and source DEMs. The impact of DEM source and resolution on slope gradient, relative height of terrain and shear wave velocity (V30 S) are addressed. It is observed that, even though, relatively coarse resolution DEMs underestimate the critical sites of steep slope gradient and the lower V30 Szones, this has limited impact on the derived normalized topographic aggravation factor. The free and easily accessibleDEMsprovide an opportunity for reasonable prediction of topographic seismic response, especially in near-real time. The slope gradient is observed to be the most sensitive topographic attribute to amplified seismic response, followed by the relative height. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. Source

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