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Van Wijk R.,International Institute of Biophysics | Wiegant F.A.C.,University Utrecht
Human and Experimental Toxicology | Year: 2010

Postexposure conditioning, as a part of hormesis, involves the application of a low dose of stress following exposure to a severe stress condition. Depending on whether the low-dose stress is of the same type of stress or is different from the initial high-dose stress causing the diseased state, postconditioning can be classified as homologous or heterologous, respectively. In clinical homeopathy, the same distinction is found between isopathic and homeopathic application of low-dose substances. Homeopathy is unique for its Similia principle, which implies that substances causing symptoms in healthy biological systems can be used to treat similar symptoms in diseased biological systems. The evaluation of the Similia principle in an experimental set-up requires the analysis of a complex sequence of 'damage-disease-treatment-effect' events. The process of recovery from an insult is then monitored and a possible beneficial effect on this recovery process, upon application of a range of substances in low dose, can subsequently be analyzed using molecular and functional parameters. It is then possible to compare the effect of treatment with the degree of similarity between the diseased state and the effects caused by homologous and/or different heterologous substances. Beneficial effects of postconditioning mild stress conditions have been described in terms of an increase of the synthesis of stress proteins. In this commentary paper, we present additional information on this aspect. The experimental data suggest that the beneficial effect of the low-dose stress condition used as heterologous postconditioning is related to similarity in molecular stress response. © The Author(s) 2010.


Del Giudice E.,National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Italy | Del Giudice E.,International Institute of Biophysics | Pulselli R.M.,University of Siena
International Journal of Design and Nature and Ecodynamics | Year: 2010

In living systems, water takes part in the dynamics of life, not only because it accounts for 99% of all biomolecules but also because it provides energy to living matter. Water has the ability to achieve an extended form of organization and provide an ensemble of different coherence domains (CDs) that are phase locked, thus maximizing their capacity to 'look for' energy from the environment. This 'coherence of coherences' of 'biological water' in living systems corresponds to a sort of higher organization. An efficient mechanism of energy transformation from CDs to biomolecules in living matter guarantees the transfer of biochemical energy necessary for the maintenance of life cycles. The dynamics of formation of dissipative structures in liquid water and the process of self-organization of living organisms induced by water are briefly discussed. Dissipative structures appear as a consequence of the phase locking within an ensemble of CDs. The process of charge and discharge of energy is discussed. © 2010 WIT Press.


Wiegant F.,University Utrecht | Van Wijk R.,University Utrecht | Van Wijk R.,International Institute of Biophysics
Homeopathy | Year: 2010

This paper describes the results of a research program focused on the beneficial effect of low dose stress conditions that were applied according to the similia principle to cells previously disturbed by more severe stress conditions. In first instance, we discuss criteria for research on the similia principle at the cellular level. Then, the homologous ('isopathic') approach is reviewed, in which the initial (high dose) stress used to disturb cellular physiology and the subsequent (low dose) stress are identical. Beneficial effects of low dose stress are described in terms of increased cellular survival capacity and at the molecular level as an increase in the synthesis of heat shock proteins (hsps). Both phenomena reflect a stimulation of the endogenous cellular self-recovery capacity. Low dose stress conditions applied in a homologous approach stimulate the synthesis of hsps and enhance survival in comparison with stressed cells that were incubated in the absence of low dose stress conditions. Thirdly, the specificity of the low dose stress condition is described where the initial (high dose) stress is different in nature from the subsequently applied (low dose) stress; the heterologous or 'heteropathic' approach. The results support the similia principle at the cellular level and add to understanding of how low dose stress conditions influence the regulatory processes underlying self-recovery. In addition, the phenomenon of 'symptom aggravation' which is also observed at the cellular level, is discussed in the context of self-recovery. Finally, the difference in efficiency between the homologous and the heterologous approach is discussed; a perspective is indicated for further research; and the relationship between studies on the similia principle and the recently introduced concept of 'postconditioning hormesis' is emphasized. © 2009 The Faculty of Homeopathy.


Lipkind M.,Kimron Veterinary Institute | Lipkind M.,International Institute of Biophysics
Advanced Science Letters | Year: 2010

According to current views, a comprehensive analysis of recordings obtained from neuronal complexes related to any individual's thinking process will permit reading the corresponding individual's thoughts. Yet, consistent reasoning leads to conclusion about the in principle impossibility to read human thoughts on the basis of a however exhaustive resolution of the physical recordings gained from the respective neural networks. © 2010 American Scientific Publishers.


Van Wijk R.,International Institute of Biophysics | Van Wijk R.,Meluna Research | Wiegant F.A.C.,University Utrecht
Frontiers in Bioscience - Elite | Year: 2011

Postexposure conditioning, as a part of hormesis, involves the application of a low dose of stress following exposure to a severe stress condition. The beneficial effect of a low level of stress in postconditioning hormesis is illustrated by a number of examples found in experimental and clinical research. Depending on whether the low-dose stress is of the same type of stress or is different from the initial high-dose stress causing the diseased state, postconditioning is classified as homologous or heterologous, respectively. In clinical homeopathy, where substances are applied according to the Similia principle, the same distinction is found between the isopathic and the 'heteropathic' or homeopathic use of low dose substances. The Similia principle implies that substances causing symptoms in healthy biological systems can be used to treat similar symptoms in diseased biological systems. Only when heterologous substances are tested for therapeutic effects, the Similia principle can be studied. It is then possible to compare the effect of treatment with the degree of similarity between the diseased state and the effects caused by different substances. The latter research was mainly performed with cells in culture using heat shocked cells post exposed to a variety of stress conditions in low dose.

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