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Rowe S.,University of Massachusetts Amherst | Alexander N.,International Food Information Council IFIC
Nutrition Today | Year: 2011

Much has been written about nutrition communication, how it should be framed, targeted, structured, and worded for greatest effect. Relatively little has been written about possible pitfalls-errors in communicating that may lead to public confusion instead of understanding. In this article, the authors lay out, in their usual irreverent style, what may be regarded as the 7 greatest errors in nutrition communication, focusing primarily on the last of these, mistiming messages-especially delivering messages too late for them to be effective. Pointing out a gap between expectations of and actual consumer behavior, the article discusses the importance of understanding consumer psychology and of effectively timing communications-both nutrition and food safety messages-so that information is delivered when consumers are ready to receive and use it. © 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Schorin M.D.,LLC LLC | Sollid K.,International Food Information Council IFIC | Edge M.S.,International Food Information Council IFIC | Bouchoux A.,International Food Information Council IFIC
Nutrition Today | Year: 2012

Sugars have a long history of safe use in foods. Placed on the Food and Drug Administration's list of foods that are "generally recognized as safe" in 1958, sugars and the health aspects of sugar consumption continue to be evaluated. Recent research has focused on several potential sugars and health relationships, sugar consumption and nutritional quality of the diet, recommendations for sugars or added sugar intake, and the utility of the glycemic index and glycemic load. The data are not clear-cut, although experts generally agree that dietary guidance focusing on calorie control, without singling out one food or nutrient, is essential to addressing the prevalence of obesity. © 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Kolasa K.M.,East Carolina University | Sollid K.,International Food Information Council IFIC | Edge M.S.,International Food Information Council IFIC | Bouchoux A.,International Food Information Council IFIC
Nutrition Today | Year: 2012

Blood pressure reduction to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease is a key public health initiative, and reducing sodium intake is currently one of the lifestyle strategies promoted to achieve blood pressure lowering in the American population. Sodium reduction is to be achieved in large part by changes in the food supply, but accomplishing this will take time. Even with sodium reduction, consumer awareness and desire to reduce sodium and make other lifestyle changes will ultimately determine whether the goal of blood pressure reduction through diet and lifestyle can be achieved. The International Food Information Council surveyed consumers about their awareness and concern about sodium as well as other lifestyle behaviors that impact blood pressure. The International Food Information Council also convened an experts roundtable, "Managing Blood Pressure through Diet and Lifestyle," to explore priorities for addressing the lifestyle management of high blood pressure. A summary of the roundtable experts' discussion and the responses of consumers with high blood pressure to the questions are reported in this article. Results from both the Consumer Research and roundtable experts indicate that a holistic approach beyond sodium reduction is needed to manage high blood pressure to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease. This approach may include messaging to consumers and medical professionals about weight management, more fruit and vegetable intake, and more physical activity. © 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Schorin M.D.,Schorin Strategies LLC | Sollid K.,International Food Information Council IFIC | Edge M.S.,International Food Information Council IFIC | Bouchoux A.,International Food Information Council IFIC
Nutrition Today | Year: 2012

As carbohydrates, sugars play many important roles in our food. They are a source of calories and, in addition to sweetening, perform many essential technical functions both in processed foods and in foods prepared in the home. However, the complex terminology used to describe sugars can be confusing. Communications regarding the definitions of various sugars, the role of sugars in our food and health, and the methods used to measure sugar consumption would be enhanced among regulators, scientists, manufacturers, health professionals, and consumers if commonly accepted definitions were harmonized. © 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Kapsak W.R.,International Food Information Council IFIC | Dimarco-Crook C.,International Food Information Council IFIC | Hill J.O.,International Food Information Council IFIC | Toner C.D.,International Food Information Council IFIC | Edge M.S.,International Food Information Council IFIC
Nutrition Today | Year: 2013

The high prevalence of overweight and obesity in the United States has increased attention to the importance of balancing calories in and out to achieve and maintain a healthy weight. Numerous policy and educational efforts are aimed at helping consumers achieve calorie balance. Still, a calorie disconnect exists as consumers remain largely unaware of personal calorie needs or the relationship between calories and weight management. A key first step in addressing consumers' calorie confusion may be to familiarize them with their "daily calorie number," or the amount of calories that are needed to maintain weight, and how that daily calorie number is impacted by physical activity. The need to individualize calorie balance communications is essential, as each person has a unique weight management profile that will be impacted by many factors, including age, physical activity, and desired weight outcome. Whereas some Americans would like to maintain weight and prevent further weight gain, many others would likely benefit from tipping the calorie balance equation to achieve successful weight loss. To effectively communicate calorie balance, it is imperative to examine consumer response to calorie balance communications. Some messages or terminology, although widely accepted by nutrition and health professionals, may not be understood by consumers. The social-ecological model is a useful framework to further examine factors that impact behavior change related to food and physical activity decisions, providing opportunities for future research and initiatives aimed at helping consumers achieve calorie balance. © 2013 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

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