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Williams A.T.,University of Swansea | Layton-Brown M.,International Coral Reef Standard | Conneely M.,International Coral Reef Standard | Morgan R.,University of South Wales
Journal of Coastal Conservation | Year: 2014

On June 6, 2000, the Merchant Vessel River Princess - dead weight 114,645 tonnes and 261 m in length, grounded on the beach off the Candolim-Sinquerim coast, Goa, India, spilling some 40 tonnes of oil. In the past 10 years it has settled some 10 m into the sea bed and taken in circa 40,000 tonnes of sand. Until the '60's the Goan economy centered on agriculture and fishing with very low key recreation. Over the last three decades it has become heavily reliant upon recreation, with 13 % of GDP arising from this sector. Nine million cubic metres of littoral drift occurs off this beach per annum, with the longshore current broken by rips into a series of circulating cells. The vessel acts as a massive groin so much so that downdrift, erosion of approximately 5 to 10 m/annum (dependent on the monsoon strength) is occurring at the Taj hotel site. Satellite imagery has shown that some 0.13 km2 beach loss has occurred since 2001. Downdrift, the beach is circa 20 m wide compared to updrift areas where it exceeds 100 m. Embryo tombola growth has now commenced between shore and ship. In addition to this, the dune system is now seriously out of equilibrium and sand bags, geotextiles etc. are currently in use to combat dune foot erosion. Questionnaires (n = 111) showed that 37 % of beach users ranked erosion as the top coastal problem. Sixty seven percent of beach users rated scenery as the most important quality of a beach and due to the grounded ship, >60 % rated the scenery as below average, as well as viewing the ship as a source of danger for swimming purposes. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Williams A.T.,University of Swansea | Layton Brown M.,International Coral Reef Standard | Conneely M.,International Coral Reef Standard | Morgan R.,International Coral Reef Standard
Journal of Coastal Research | Year: 2011

On June 6, 2000, the Merchant Vessel River Princess with a dead weight 114,645 tonnes and length of 261m, grounded on the beach off the Candolim-Sinquerim coast. Goa. India, spilling some 40 tonnes of oil. In the past decade it has sunk some 10m into the sea bed taking in circa 40,000 tonnes of sand. The vessel acts as a massive breakwater and downdrift erosion is occurring of approximately 5 to 10m/annum dependent on monsoon strength with satellite imagery showing that circa 0.13 km2 beach loss has occurred since 2001. This degree of erosion is seen by business owners to pose a serious threat to their properties located along this stretch of coast. A number of businesses have already incurred varying degrees of property damage which is believed to be directly attributable to the presence of MV River Princess. There are also significant concerns that the presence of the vessel and beach appearance is deterring many potential visitors from coming/returning. Seventy three percent of business people were of the opinion that their knowledge of coastal issue was moderate-very high; 67% thought that the view of the vessel was unpleasant and 62% perceived it as being dangerous for people; and 53% stated that it was the cause of severe erosion. Functional analyses indicated an ecological scoring of 0.66 and social one of 0.76, inferring that recreation should be the main management aim. © 2011 Coastal Education & Research Foundation.

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