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PubMed | University of Edinburgh, Ministry of Health, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Murdoch University and 4 more.
Type: | Journal: Acta tropica | Year: 2016

Following confirmation that a remote village of approximately 300 inhabitants in northern Lao PDR was hyperendemic for the Neglected Tropical Disease Taenia solium, a pilot human-porcine therapeutic control intervention was implemented between October 2013 and November 2014. Mass drug administration with a three day albendazole 400mg protocol was offered to all eligible humans in October 2013 and March 2014. At these times, and again in October 2014, eligible village pigs received the anti-cysticercosis TSOL18 vaccination and an oral dose of oxfendazole anthelmintic at 30mg/kg, both repeated one month later. Community and individual human taeniasis prevalences were estimated via copro-antigen ELISA of volunteered human faecal samples prior to October 2013, and again in January 2015, in order to examine the short term impact of the intervention.


PubMed | University of Edinburgh, Ministry of Health, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Murdoch University and 4 more.
Type: | Journal: Acta tropica | Year: 2016

Following confirmation that a remote village of approximately 300 inhabitants in northern Lao PDR was hyperendemic for the Neglected Tropical Disease Taenia solium, a pilot human-porcine therapeutic control intervention was implemented between October 2013 and November 2014. Mass drug administration with a three day albendazole 400mg protocol was offered to all eligible humans in October 2013 and March 2014. At these times, and again in October 2014, eligible village pigs received the anti-cysticercosis TSOL18 vaccination and an oral dose of oxfendazole anthelmintic at 30mg/kg, both repeated one month later. Community and individual human taeniasis prevalences were estimated via copro-antigen ELISA of volunteered human faecal samples prior to October 2013, and again in January 2015, in order to examine the short term impact of the intervention.


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Three champions of women’s entrepreneurship who have blazed paths for women in corporate procurement and science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) were inducted into the prestigious Women’s Business Enterprise (WBE) Hall of Fame. Virginia Littlejohn received the Trailblazers Award for spearheading a series of transformational initiatives in the United States and internationally. Littlejohn was one of the three primary architects of the Women’s Business Ownership Act signed by President Reagan in 1988. She organized three global best-practice conferences on women’s entrepreneurship for the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in Paris and Istanbul in the 1990s and early 2000s. She currently serves as the Lead International Consultant for the Women and Trade program for the International Trade Centre, a joint agency of the United Nations and World Trade Organization in Geneva. She also serves as an American representative on the Women’s 20 (W20) for the G20 countries. Littlejohn is a co-founder of Quantum Leaps, Inc., which sees investing in women’s entrepreneurship as a key strategy to grow the economy, and works to accelerate women’s entrepreneurship both nationally and internationally. She serves as the organization’s President for Innovation and Strategic Initiatives, which includes the incubation of FutureForward. Jennifer Bisceglie, CEO of Quantum Leaps, says, “Virginia Littlejohn has been blazing trails in women’s enterprise development since the 1970s.” In addition to her lengthy list of achievements, Bisceglie says, “Virginia also conceptualized and provided the initial incubation for the Global Banking Alliance for Women, and incubated WEConnect International. With FutureForward, she’s focused on engendering women entrepreneurial innovation.” The American Institute of Diversity and Commerce hosted the Hall of Fame awards in Dallas, Texas, Nov. 29. Ten were inducted, including Quantum Leaps supporters Joan Kerr and Carmen Castillo. Joan Kerr, Director, Supply Chain Responsibility for Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) in San Francisco, accepted the Hall of Fame's Corporate Leadership Award this year on behalf of PG&E. Kerr is a corporate advisor for Quantum Leaps' FutureForward initiative, and counsels the organization on the cutting-edge products and services that women suppliers need to provide to meet the innovation needs of corporate value chains. “The acceleration of innovation is changing how all corporations operate and what they procure,” Kerr says. “From renewable energy and smart grid, to the internet of things, advanced robotics and cloud computing – corporate spend is pivoting and we need WBEs at the forefront of providing these new products and services.” Carmen Castillo, President, SDI International in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, received the WBE Award. She is a member of FutureForward's Inner Circle advisory group of high-growth women-owned businesses. SDI is an award-winning supplier that provides full lifecycle business process outsourcing and managed services with deep expertise in small supplier, non-critical, tail-end spend. The company operates Centers of Excellence in Argentina, Belgium, Canada, China, India, Slovakia, the UK, and the US. “I work tirelessly with councils and organizations that support women’s entrepreneurship, worldwide, for many reasons,” Castillo says. “We need to continue to make a push for STEM education and business development for WBEs, to make us even more competitive while doing business across borders.” Quantum Leaps, Inc. is a global accelerator for women's entrepreneurship based in Alexandria, Virginia. It works with governments, international institutions, and women’s business associations to promote women’s entrepreneurship as a means of driving quantifiable economic growth at the national, regional, and global levels. FutureForward is an initiative that Quantum is currently incubating. Its mission is to close the innovation gap between men and women, double the number of women on the leading edge of next generation innovation within five years, and ultimately achieve gender parity in innovative entrepreneurship.


Bellaubi F.,University of Osnabrück | Visscher J.T.,International Consultant
Water International | Year: 2014

This paper explores through case studies the quality of water service delivery in four different water utilities in Kenya and Ghana. The research confirms that the utilities’ current performance indicators by themselves are insufficient to assess the access of users to good-quality water service delivery. The case studies show that low-income populations receive a poor quality of water service delivery. The paper concludes that benchmarking needs to be complemented with a more in-depth analysis of the water service delivery by water providers. © 2014, International Water Resources Association.


Silva D.P.,International Consultant | Quintero J.P.,Gobierno en linea
ACM International Conference Proceeding Series | Year: 2012

This paper describes the key factors for the development of a successful strategy for the e-government uptake in Colombia. Copyright 2012 ACM.


Nyberg B.J.,Office of Global Health and HIV AIDS | Yates D.D.,International Consultant | Lovich R.,Save the Children | Coulibaly-Traore D.,Deputy Care and Treatment Branch Chief | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes | Year: 2012

President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR's) response to the millions of children impacted by HIV/AIDS was to designate 10% of its budget to securing their futures, making it the leading supporter of programs reaching orphan and vulnerable children (OVC) programs globally. This article describes the evolution of PEPFAR's OVC response based on programmatic lessons learned and an evergrowing understanding of the impacts of HIV/AIDS. In launching this international emergency effort and transitioning it toward sustainable local systems, PEPFAR helped establish both the technical content and the central importance of care and support for OVC as a necessary complement to biomedical efforts to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Critical services are reaching millions of HIV-affected children and families through vast networks of community-based responders and strengthened national systems of care. But rapid program scale-up has at times resulted in inconsistent responses, failure to match resources to properly assessed needs, and a dearth of rigorous program evaluations. Key investments should continue to be directed toward more sustainable and effective responses. These include greater attention to children's most significant developmental stages, a focus on building the resilience of families and communities, a proper balance of government and civil society investments, and more rigorous evaluation and research to ensure evidence-based programming. Even as HIV prevalence declines and medical treatment improves and expands, the impacts of HIV/AIDS on children, families, communities, economies, and societies will continue to accumulate for generations. Protecting the full potential of children-and thus of societies-requires sustained and strategic global investments aligned with experience and science. Copyright © 2012 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Datta N.R.,Center for Radiation Oncology | Samiei M.,International Consultant | Bodis S.,Center for Radiation Oncology | Bodis S.,University of Zürich
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2014

Radiotherapy (RT) is required for nearly half of the newly diagnosed cancer patients. To optimise the quality and availability of RT, guidelines have been proposed by European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology-QUAntification of Radiation Therapy Infrastructure And Staffing Needs (ESTRO-QUARTS) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This study evaluates the present status of RT capacity in Europe and the projected needs by 2020 as per these recommendations. Thirty-nine of the 53 countries, listed in Europe by the UN Statistical Division, whose cancer incidences, teletherapy and human resources were available in the Global Cancer Incidence, Mortality and Prevalence (GLOBOCAN), International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and DIrectory of RAdiotherapy Centres (DIRAC) (IAEA) databases were evaluated. A total of 3550 teletherapy units (TRT), 7017 radiation oncologists (RO), 3685 medical physicists (MP) and 12,788 radiotherapy technologists (RTT) are presently available for the 3.44 million new cancer cases reported annually in these countries. The present infrastructure and human resources in RT are estimated to provide RT access to 74.3% of the patients requiring RT. The current capacity in TRT, RO, MP and RTT when compared with recommended guidelines has a deficit of 25.6%, 18.3%, 22.7% and 10.6%, respectively. Thus, to respond to requirements by 2020, the existing capacity needs to be augmented by an additional 1698 TRTs, 2429 ROs, 1563 MPs and 2956 RTTs. With an imminent rise in cancer incidence, multifaceted strategic planning at national and international levels within a coordinated comprehensive cancer control programme is highly desirable to give adequate access to all patients who require radiotherapy across Europe. Specific steps to address this issue at national and continental levels involving all major stakeholders are proposed. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Boelen C.,International Consultant | Woollard R.,University of British Columbia
Medical Teacher | Year: 2011

More than ever are we facing the challenge of providing evidence that what we do responds to priority health needs and challenges of the ones we intend to serve: patients, citizens, families, communities and the nation at large. Which are those health needs and challenges? Who defines them? How do medical schools organize themselves to address them through their education, research and service delivery functions? Principles of social accountability call for an explicit three-tier engagement: identification of current and prospective social needs and challenges, adaptation of school's programmes to meet them and verification that anticipated effects have benefited society. Measurement tools need to be designed and tested to steer development in this direction, particularly to establish a meaningful relationship between inputs, processes, outputs and impact on health. The Global Consensus on Social Accountability of Medical Schools provides a unique opportunity to foster collaborative research and development in an area of great significance for the future of medical education. © 2011 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved.


Kamal-Yanni M.M.,Oxfam | Potet J.,International Consultant | Saunders P.M.,International Consultant
Malaria Journal | Year: 2012

Background: Despite great progress towards malaria control, the disease continues to be a major public health problem in many developing countries, especially for poor women and children in remote areas. Resistance to artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) emerged in East Asia. Its spread would threaten the only effective malaria treatment currently available. Improvement in availability of diagnosis as part of malaria control has highlighted the fact that many fevers are not due to malaria. These fevers also need to be promptly diagnosed and adequately treated in order to improve public health outcomes in developing countries. Methods. This review looked for evidence for the most effective approach to deliver malaria treatment in developing countries, by public sector, formal and informal private sector, and community health workers (CHWs). The authors analysed 31 studies to assess providers based on six parameters: knowledge and practice of provider, diagnosis, referral practices, price of medicine, availability of ACT, and treatment coverage and impact on morbidity and mortality. Results: The public sector has made progress in prevention and treatment in many countries, but facilities are inaccessible to some communities, and the sector suffers shortages of health workers and stock-outs of medicines. Despite wide outreach, the private sector, especially informal facilities, presents public health risks. This is due to an inability to diagnose and treat non-malarial fevers, and an innate motive to over-prescribe malaria treatment. The need to pay for treatment is a major factor in deterring poor women and children from accessing the medicines they need. A system that depends on ability to pay risks a repeat of the chloroquine story, where an effective and cheap anti-malarial drug was rendered useless partly due to under-treatment. CHWs have proved to be effective agents in providing correct diagnosis and treatment of malaria and other common fevers, even in remote areas. Conclusions: The evidence shows that there is no short-cut to investing in training and supervision of providers, or in treating malaria within a public health context rather than as a separate disease. The studies highlighted that all outlets face challenges in delivering their services, but that CHWs scored highly in almost all parameters. CHWs have proved to be effective agents in providing correct diagnosis and treatment of malaria and other common fevers, even in remote areas. Their role should be recognized and expanded. © 2012 Kamal-Yanni et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Tamburlini G.,Institute for Maternal and Child Health IRCCS Burlo Garofolo | Siupsinskas G.,International Consultant | Bacci A.,World Health Organization
PLoS ONE | Year: 2011

Background: Progress in maternal and neonatal mortality has been slow in many countries despite increasing access to institutional births, suggesting deficiencies in the quality of care. We carried out a systematic assessment of the quality of maternal and newborn care in three CEE/CIS countries, using an innovative approach to identify priority issues and promote action. Methods: A standard-based tool, covering over 400 items grouped in 13 main areas ranging from support services to case management, was used to assess a sample of ten maternity hospitals in Albania, Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan. Sources of information were visit to services, medical records, observation of cases, and interviews with staff and mothers. A score (range 0 to 3) was attributed to each item and area of care. The assessment was carried out by a multidisciplinary team of international and national professionals. Local managers and staff provided the necessary information and were involved in discussing the findings and the priority actions. Results: Quality of care was found to be substandard in all 13 areas. The lowest scores (between one and two) were obtained by: management of normal labour, delivery, obstetric complications and sick babies; infection prevention; use of guidelines and audits; monitoring and follow-up. Neonatal care as a whole scored better than obstetric care. Interviewed mothers identified lack of information, insufficient support during labour and lack of companionship as main issues. Actions to improve quality of care were identified at facility as well as at central level and framed according to main health system functions. Conclusions: Quality of care is a key issue to improve maternal and neonatal outcomes, particularly in countries such as CEE/CIS where access to institutional births is nearly universal. Approaches that involve health professionals and managers in comprehensive, action-oriented assessments of quality of care are promising and should be further supported. © 2011 Tamburlini et al.

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