International Center for Research on Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases

Kyoto, Japan

International Center for Research on Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases

Kyoto, Japan

Time filter

Source Type

Sagara M.,Research Institute for Production Development | Sagara M.,International Center for Research on Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases | Njelekela M.,Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences | Teramoto T.,International Center for Research on Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases | And 9 more authors.
International Journal of Hypertension | Year: 2011

To investigate the effects of daily supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on coronary heart disease risks in 38 middle-aged men with hypertension and/or hypercholesterolemia in Scotland, a five-week double-blind placebo-controlled dietary supplementation with either 2 g of DHA or active placebo (1 g of olive oil) was conducted. Percent composition of DHA in plasma phospholipids increased significantly in DHA group. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate decreased significantly in DHA group, but not in placebo group. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) increased significantly, and total cholesterol (TC)/HDL-C and non-HDL-C/HDL-C ratios decreased significantly in both groups. There was no change in TC and non-HDL-C. We conclude that 2 g/day of DHA supplementation reduced coronary heart disease risk factor level improving blood pressure, heart rate, and lipid profiles in hypertensive, hypercholesterolemic Scottish men who do not eat fish on a regular basis. Copyright © 2011 Miki Sagara et al.


Yamori Y.,Mukogawa Women's University | Yamori Y.,Research Institute for Production Development | Yamori Y.,International Center for Research on Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases | Sagara M.,Research Institute for Production Development | And 8 more authors.
Hypertension Research | Year: 2015

Serum, plasma and dietary magnesium (Mg) have been reported to be inversely associated with cardiovascular disease risk factors. We examined the associations between the 24-h urinary Mg/creatinine (Cre) ratio and cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as body mass index (BMI), blood pressure (BP), serum total cholesterol (TC) and prevalence of obesity, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted among 4211 participants (49.7% women) aged 48-56 years in 50 population samples from 22 countries in the World Health Organization-coordinated Cardiovascular Diseases and Alimentary Comparison (CARDIAC) Study (1985-1994). In linear regression analyses, Mg/Cre ratio was inversely associated with BMI, systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP) and TC (P for linear trend <0.001 for each). These associations were not markedly altered by adjustment for traditional risk factors, urinary markers or cohort effects. Multivariate-adjusted mean values for the subjects in the highest Mg/Cre ratio quintile were 6.3, 3.4, 5.3 and 4.6% lower than those for the subjects in the lowest quintile for BMI, SBP, DBP and TC (P<0.001, respectively). The prevalence of obesity, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia was 2.10 (95% confidence interval: 1.50, 2.95), 1.55 (1.25, 1.92) and 2.06 (1.63, 2.62) times higher (P<0.001, respectively) among the subjects in the lowest Mg/Cre ratio quintile than in the subjects in the highest quintile. These associations were not appreciably altered by adjustment for potential confounding variables. In conclusion, higher 24-h urinary Mg/Cre ratio was associated with lower cardiovascular disease risk factors, including BMI, BP, TC, obesity, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. © 2015 The Japanese Society of Hypertension All rights reserved.

Loading International Center for Research on Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases collaborators
Loading International Center for Research on Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases collaborators