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News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: motherboard.vice.com

Intelligence officers in Khartoum, the capital of Sudan, have a unique capability that could help them fight against ISIS: reportedly, they can hack WhatsApp chats, and identify ISIS sympathizers on social media. The US Treasury announced in January that it expects to lift sanctions on Sudan, which it had listed among the State Sponsors of Terrorism, because of such Sudanese cooperation. But few American officials acknowledge that Khartoum's counterterrorism efforts to surveil dissidents and rebels and crack down on the freedom of speech rely in part on a hacker group called Electronic Jihad. As Sudan struggles with corruption, poverty, and stagflation, its government has been combatting isolation in the international community by investing in its telecom infrastructure. These investments include purchasing surveillance technology, which Khartoum even tried to acquire from Milan-based tech company Hacking Team. Telephone companies such as MTN Sudan, Sudani One, and Zain Sudan have flourished in the last decade, and Sudan has hosted a strong system since 1996, when the Sudanese government introduced mobile service across the major cities, according to The World Factbook. But the expansion of telecommunications in Sudan has also served to strengthen the Sudanese government's stranglehold on freedom of expression. Electronic Jihad, the government-backed hacker group and subunit of the National Intelligence and Security Service (NISS), employs computer and network surveillance as well as cell phone surveillance to stifle all military and political opposition to Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir, who has ruled the country since 1989. "The adoption of modern, electronic surveillance methods would be in keeping with the way in which the Bashir government has historically monitored its perceived opposition," said Steve McDonald, a former official at the US State Department and global fellow at the Wilson International Center for Scholars who focuses on conflict resolution in Africa. "Not just opposition parties, but student groups, law and women's organizations, any outspoken civil society leader has been followed, groups infiltrated, and records kept on activities and actions, both planned and perceived." Back in the 1980s, Sudanese Islamists recruited students majoring in applied science, engineering, and medicine with the intent of overthrowing the country's democratic government, according to Networks of Knowledge Production in Sudan: Identities, Mobilities, and Technologies. The students, committed to conducting an "electronic jihad" against secularism, provided intelligence to Islamist officers in the Sudanese Armed Forces when they launched a coup d'état in 1989. In the 1990s, the students joined the NISS as Electronic Jihad under the new Islamist military dictatorship. Sudanese rebels allege that the hacker group has continued to aid the Sudanese Armed Forces in operations against perceived military and political enemies of the state, surveilling the Sudanese Justice and Equality Movement (JEM) and the Sudanese Liberation Movement/Army in Darfur and the Sudanese People's Liberation Movement/Army–North in the Blue Nile and the Nuba Mountains near the South Sudanese border. JEM leaders asserted that Electronic Jihad records rebels' calls and tracks their locations, providing warplanes coordinates to launch airstrikes. (Motherboard made multiple attempts to contact the government in Khartoum and received no response.) "The managers of all public companies in the communication field are from the NISS, so they can monitor and spy on people on behalf of the government," Adam Eissa Abakar, a JEM leader, told me. In 2015, the Sudanese government ordered telephone companies to bug telephone lines in Darfur. Now that the American government has established its own regime for mass surveillance across Africa, while dictatorships from Ethiopia to Gambia are building their own electronic police states, Sudan may prove just another example of the new norm for data privacy and security culture on the continent. If Sudanese dissidents and rebels hope to evade their government's surveillance and evict it from power before the end of the Third Sudanese Civil War, they will have to rely on new tactics. For now, Khartoum has the upper hand in the online battle between between democracy and dictatorship. Subscribe to Science Solved It , Motherboard's new show about the greatest mysteries that were solved by science.


Simona Onori, an assistant professor at Clemson University, has received a $500,000 Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) award from the National Science Foundation to advance her work to develop integrated modeling and control for aftertreatment systems to reduce fine-particle emissions from gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines. GDI engines now account for about 60% of the US market, and their use worldwide is forecast to grow. GDI engines have better fuel economy and lower carbon-dioxide emissions than more conventional port fuel injection engines; however, the technology results in higher fine-particle emissions. The research Onori and her team are doing focuses on gasoline particulate filters (GPF). While the dynamics of diesel engine particulate filters (DPF) are well understood, particulates produced in GDI engines have substantially different characteristics. Onori notes that an integrated approach to reduce gasoline particulates is necessary because engine operating conditions determine oxygen and fuel content and temperature of the exhaust gas, which influence the output of the catalytic converter, which in turn governs soot accumulation and oxidation in particulate filters. Onori’s project is intended to enable new exhaust gas aftertreatment technologies for GDI engines based on a modeling framework at the intersection of macroscale modeling, numerical simulations and optimization theory. System-level models of the engine, catalytic converter, and gasoline particulate filter will be integrated across length scales, incorporating effects ranging from clogging and regeneration of the filter pores, to continuum gas flow in the exhaust manifold. The framework will enable formulation of low-order models of aftertreatment systems suitable for real-time optimization-based control, based on systematic and rigorous reduction of continuum models while maintaining accuracy and fidelity. The project is intended to improve substantially macro-scale representations of soot-layer physical properties and pore-scale loading and regeneration phenomena in particulate filters. The results will be used to design physics-based estimators for robust control of advanced aftertreatment systems. The resulting engine-control strategies would be programmed into the engine control unit. Onori and her team also plan to develop a control program that would enable three complex systems—the filter, exhaust and three-way catalyst—to work together. Onori will present aspects of her work on emissions controls at the upcoming 2017 American Control Conference in Seattle in May. Among her papers will be a discussion of the development of a two-dimensional (2-D), multi-channel, GPF system model and a multi-scale modeling framework to resolve mass, energy, and momentum transport equations of the exhaust gases in a GPF. Onori started working on emission control problems right after joining the Clemson University International Center for Automotive Research (CU-ICAR) in 2014. She was the principal investigator of an industry-sponsored project aimed at developing model-based control strategies for the new advanced aftertreatment systems.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

Pres. Donald Trump’s administration has announced plans to dismantle an array of federal efforts to fight global warming, including a program to reduce carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants, a rule limiting methane gas leaks and a mandate that aggressively boosts auto emissions standards. But Trump officials face a major roadblock in their efforts, legal scholars say. It is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s 2009 formal “endangerment finding,” which states carbon dioxide and five other greenhouse gases emitted from smokestacks and other man-made sources “threaten the public health and welfare of current and future generations.” This agency rule, supported by two Supreme Court decisions, legally compels the government to do exactly what its new leaders want to avoid: regulate greenhouse gases. Although EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt publicly doubts a connection between human-produced carbon emissions and global warming, any attempt to undo this rule “would be walking into a legal buzz saw,” says Michael Gerrard, faculty director of the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia University. Endangerment is “the linchpin for everything—all of the carbon regulation under the Clean Air Act,” says Patrick Parenteau, a professor of environmental law at Vermont Law School. The rule’s fundamental power is exactly why Pruitt has to remove it, says Myron Ebell, who oversaw the Trump transition team at the EPA. “You can’t just take out the flowers—you have to take out the roots—starting with the endangerment finding,” says Ebell, a senior fellow at the conservative think tank the Competitive Enterprise Institute. “You can undo the Obama climate agenda on the surface by reopening the Clean Power Plant rule, the methane rule, rescinding the [auto emissions] standards and so on. But the underlying foundation remains.” The conservative Web site Breitbart, read widely among Trump’s supporters and still tied to its former publisher, White House adviser Steve Bannon, has attacked Pruitt as a political careerist for reportedly resisting pressure to revoke the finding. The rule rests on a 2007 Supreme Court decision in the case Massachusetts v. EPA, which determined the agency has the authority under the Clean Air Act to regulate greenhouse gases. When the finding itself was later challenged, the Court upheld it. The endangerment finding prevents Pruitt from ignoring climate change or eliminating greenhouse gas regulations outright. The EPA can attempt to water down these standards and regulations, perhaps substantially. But Pruitt “would have to come up with a scientific basis for saying that greenhouse gas emissions do not in fact pose a threat to public health and welfare,” Gerrard says. “That would be a very difficult finding, considering every court that has addressed the issue of the science of climate change has found there to be a solid factual, scientific basis for it.” To begin to remove the endangerment rule, the EPA would have to go through a formal rule-making process. That means inviting public comments, reviewing available evidence and scientifically justifying every point. Formulating and then defending such a document in court would be a big challenge, given it cuts against the legal and scientific consensus linking carbon to climate change. Even Ebell concedes this is a formidable obstacle. “That’s why a lot of people on our side say it’s not worth the trouble,” he says. “The people who disagree with me are not nuts—they are making substantial arguments for why we should not do it.” The endangerment finding has its roots in the waning days of the Clinton administration, when then–EPA General Counsel Jonathan Cannon drafted a legal memo stating the agency had the authority to regulate carbon emissions. At the time this was a novel and counterintuitive idea. CO is a ubiquitous, naturally occurring gas, essential to photosynthesis and other basic processes of life on Earth. It’s not poisonous like smog and other dangerous pollutants targeted by the Clean Air Act. “CO is a different sort of pollutant than many that the EPA regulates,” says Cannon, now a professor at the University of Virginia School of Law. “Its effects are felt over time through the climate system, not as immediate effects on one’s lungs or physical systems.” But the Clean Air Act “has a very broad definition of what a pollutant can be and what harm a pollutant causes,” says George Kimbrell, legal director of the International Center for Technology Assessment and the Center for Food Safety, two related groups among a coalition of environmental organizations that formally petitioned the EPA to regulate carbon in 1999. The law defines “air pollutant” as "any air pollution agent or combination of such agents, including any physical, chemical, biological, radioactive...substance or matter, which is emitted into or otherwise enters the ambient air.” According to Kimbrell, “The breadth of that language suggested greenhouse gas emissions would qualify under the statute.” The language prompted a lawsuit from states and small environmental groups, during the George W. Bush administration, to sue the EPA to force it to regulate carbon. The result was the Supreme Court’s 5–4 2007 Massachusetts decision. Following that ruling, the endangerment finding then spelled out the legal rationale and the scientific basis for regulation. What can the Trump administration do to get out of this regulatory box? It could push Congress to amend the Clean Air Act to explicitly exclude carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases from the list of air pollutants. But even if it passed the Republican-dominated House, Parenteau notes, such a bill could be effectively opposed by Democrats in the Senate, who have enough votes to hold up or change legislation. . The EPA could also target climate rules not based on the endangerment finding, such as procedures for monitoring and reporting greenhouse gases, according to Gerrard. The most likely outcome, legal scholars say, is a series of incremental battles in which the administration and Congress try to weaken individual climate rules and enforcement—while those efforts are repeatedly challenged in court by states and environmental groups hoping to run out the clock on the Trump administration. “One reason the endangerment finding is important,” Cannon says, “is that, should administrations change, it provides the basis for further climate initiatives.”


NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Kroll Bond Rating Agency (KBRA) announced today the appointment of Carol Pierce to the role of director in KBRA’s insurance group with a focus on captives, reinsurers, and alternative capital providers. Pierce joins KBRA’s analytic team after thirteen years with Munich Reinsurance America, where she was responsible for market, competitor, and client analysis, initially for the specialty-markets division and more recently for the reinsurance division. Prior to Munich Re, Pierce worked at A.M. Best, where she managed the team responsible for expanding ratings among captive insurers. Carol has held various underwriting and product development positions with several major insurance companies during her more than thirty years in the insurance industry. Pierce is a former member of the board of directors of the Vermont Captive Insurance Association (VCIA) and the International Center for Captive Insurance Education (ICCIE). She has been an active member of the Captive Insurance Company Association (CICA) and was a past recipient of the VCIA Captive Crusader Award. Additionally, Pierce has been a frequent speaker at industry conferences and has authored a variety of articles. Pierce holds a bachelor’s degree from Smith College and an MBA from the Keller Graduate School of Management. She is a chartered property casualty underwriter (CPCU) and has earned the Associate in Reinsurance (ARe) designation. “We are excited to have Carol on our analytic team. Her unique expertise, keen understanding of the alternative risk market, overall industry knowledge, and analytic skillset are tremendous assets to our credit-ratings team as well as the markets we serve,” said Andrew Edelsberg, managing director in the insurance group. KBRA is registered with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission as a Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organization (NRSRO). In addition, KBRA is recognized by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) as a Credit Rating Provider (CRP).


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"When you look through the Magnum archive, you cannot help but feel a mixture of jubilation and vertigo. The vast collection of images and information amassed over the seven decades since the creation of the cooperative—the great events of the day, together with the commonplace facts and deeds of everyday life, the laughter, the violence, moments of magic or of symbolic significance, and even representations of abstract thought—potentially it contains all the histories of the world," says Chéroux. "Magnum Manifesto points to how vast the exploitable fields covered by the collection are. It offers a small reconstruction of the entire range of human experience and shows that Magnum is a world in itself." The exhibition is organized into three main parts: Magnum Manifesto features group and individual projects and includes more than 250 prints and 300 projected photographs, as well as more than 130 objects—books, magazines, videos, and rarely-seen archival documents. Among many others, it incorporates the work of Christopher Anderson, Jonas Bendiksen, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Cornell and Robert Capa, Chim, Raymond Depardon, Bieke Depoorter, Elliott Erwitt, Martine Franck, Leonard Freed, Paul Fusco, Cristina Garcia Rodero, Burt Glinn, Jim Goldberg, Joseph Koudelka, Sergio Larrain, Susan Meiselas, Wayne Miller, Martin Parr, Marc Riboud, Alessandra Sanguinetti, Eugene W. Smith, Alec Soth, Chris Steele-Perkins, Dennis Stock, Mikhael Subotzky, and Alex Webb. The exhibition is a co-production between ICP and Magnum Photos. The accompanying catalogue, published by Thames & Hudson, showcases more than 510 photographs (230 in color) and features essays by Chéroux and Bouveresse as well as a timeline of Magnum Photos' history. Also on view as of May 26, to coincide with the opening of Magnum Manifesto, is Unwavering Vision #2—the latest incarnation of the interactive multimedia installation by Alan Govenar, Jean-Michel Sanchez, and Julien Roger, produced by Documentary Arts in association with on-situ. Installed in the free public space at the ICP Museum, the engaging piece now offers a specially designed filter to look at 1485 Magnum images from ICP's permanent collection. This multimedia installation builds on Unwavering Vision #1 and includes 3668 images of social change, as well as new audio segments, videos, and biographies. Clément Chéroux is a photo-historian with a Ph.D in art history. Since January 2017, he has been the senior curator for photography at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. From 2007 to 2016, he was curator and then chief curator for photography at the Centre Pompidou in Paris. As an author or editor, he has published thirty books about photography, including L'Expérience photographique d'August Strindberg (1994), Fautographie, petite histoire de l'erreur photographique (2003), Diplopie, l'image photographique à l'ère des médias globalisés : essai sur le 11 septembre 2001 (2009), Vernaculaires, essais d'histoire de la photographie (2013), and Avant l'avant-garde, du jeu en photographie (2015). He has curated over thirty exhibitions, including Mémoire des camps. Photographies des camps de concentration et d'extermination nazis, 1933–1999 (2001), The Perfect Medium. Photography and the Occult (2004), La Subversion des images : surréalisme, photographie, film (2009), Shoot! Existential Photography (2010), Henri Cartier-Bresson (2014), Paparazzi ! Photographes, stars et artistes (2014), and Walker Evans (2017). Clara Bouveresse is a photography historian. She holds a Ph.D in art history from Paris 1 Panthéon–Sorbonne University. Her doctoral thesis explored the evolution of Magnum Photos since its creation in 1947. She is the author of Histoire de l'agence Magnum (Flammarion) and co-author of Magnum Manifesto (Thames & Hudson). From 2014 to 2015, she was a Georges Lurcy fellow at Columbia University, New York. Pauline Vermare is an associate curator at the International Center of Photography, New York (ICP). Before joining ICP, Pauline worked at MoMA on the exhibition and publication Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Modern Century. From 2003 to 2009, she was the head of communications and exhibitions production at the Henri Cartier-Bresson Foundation in Paris. From 2001 to 2002, she worked at Magnum Photos' Paris office. As a curator, Pauline has been part of ICP's exhibition department since 2010 and worked on the production of numerous ICP shows and publications, including The Mexican Suitcase, Elliott Erwitt: Personal Best, Christer Strömholm: Les Amies de Place Blanche, Sebastião Salgado: Genesis, Capa in Color, ¡CUBA, CUBA!, and Public, Private, Secret. She holds a Masters of International Relations from the Paris Institute of Political Studies (Sciences Po) and a Masters in Japanese Language and Civilization (Langues'O). In 1947, four photographers, Robert Capa, Henri Cartier-Bresson, George Rodger, and David "Chim" Seymour, toasted the founding of what would become the world's most influential artist collective over a celebratory magnum of champagne in the Museum of Modern Art, New York City. Over the past 70 years, 92 photographers have contributed to the story of Magnum, and today 49 photographer members continue to chronicle the world, interpreting its people, events, and issues through visual storytelling. Magnum Photos remains an artists' cooperative of great diversity and distinction, owned by its photographer members, and it represents some of the world's most renowned photographers, maintaining its founding ideals and idiosyncratic mix of journalist, artist, and storyteller. The International Center of Photography (ICP) is the world's leading institution dedicated to photography and visual culture. Cornell Capa founded ICP in 1974 to preserve the legacy of "concerned photography"—the creation of socially and politically minded images that have the potential to educate and change the world—and the center's mission endures today, even as the photographic medium and imagemaking practices have evolved. Through its exhibitions, school, public programs, and community outreach, ICP offers an open forum for dialogue about the role that photographs, videos, and new media play in our society. To date, it has presented more than 700 exhibitions and offered thousands of classes at every level. ICP brings together photographers, artists, students, and scholars to create and interpret the realm of the image. Here, members of this unique community are encouraged to explore photography and visual culture as mediums of empowerment and as catalysts for wide-reaching social change. Visit icp.org/concerned to learn more. ICP's presentation of Magnum Manifesto is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, and by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/icp-presents-magnum-manifesto-300464604.html


The Public International Law Practice focuses on international disputes, treaty interpretation, and global investment protection and represents clients in the negotiation, enforcement, and implementation of international agreements. The practice group adds to the capabilities of the firm's renowned litigation, international arbitration and public policy services for clients in a wide array of industries. While at the State Department, Mr. Pearsall led a team of lawyers who represented the United States in investor-state and state-to-state disputes. His team successfully defended a $15 billion North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Chapter 11 claim brought by TransCanada in connection with the Keystone XL Pipeline. Mr. Pearsall successfully defended the US in a NAFTA Chapter 11 claim brought by Canadian pharmaceutical company Apotex and in a state-to-state case brought by Ecuador under the US-Ecuador bilateral investment treaty. He also oversaw several important submissions on behalf of the US that clarified key treaty obligations, perhaps most notably in the groundbreaking Eli Lily v. Canada NAFTA Chapter 11 dispute. Mr. Pearsall was the lead lawyer for the US on several significant cross-border infrastructure project permitting reviews, including the Keystone XL Pipeline.  He participated in the negotiation for the US of several major trade and investment agreements, including the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, the Mauritius Convention and the bilateral investment treaty with China. He also served as the lead negotiator on several multilateral treaties relating to ocean and fisheries issues. "We are thrilled to have Patrick on board, as he will enhance our capacity in the important investor-state sphere of international arbitrations.  In his eight years at the State Department he took a leadership role in many high-stakes public international law arbitrations, projects and agreements and is deeply familiar with the process and the players on a global basis," said New York Partner Richard F. Ziegler, co-chair of the firm's International Arbitration Practice. Charlie Lightfoot, International Arbitration Practice co-chair and London office managing partner, added, "Patrick brings a sought-after dimension to the sophisticated representation we already offer clients in their cross-border matters. He has negotiated the treaties that currently govern some international arbitrations.  In addition to his role in investor-state disputes, Patrick will also be a key player in our international commercial arbitration practice." "Jenner & Block's reputation in international arbitration and public policy, along with its values of professional excellence and public service, make it an ideal firm for me to further develop my practice," said Mr. Pearsall. "I am excited for this new chapter in my career and I look forward to working with the firm's highly regarded lawyers across practices." The Global Arbitration Review/Who's Who Legal identified Mr. Pearsall as a "Future Leader (Under 45)" earlier this year.  He served as the US delegate to the International Court of Arbitration's (ICC) Task Force on Arbitration with States or State-Owned Entities and served on its Special Drafting Committee for revisions of the 2012 ICC Rules. He is a steering committee member of the International Bar Association's Sub-Committee on Investor State Arbitration.  Mr. Pearsall also has published articles and papers on both commercial and investor-state arbitration, and is a frequent speaker at conferences on cross-border dispute resolution and international investment issues.  Mr. Pearsall is an adjunct professor at Georgetown University Law Center on public international law dispute resolution and investment arbitration; he has also lectured on international arbitration at Columbia Law School, Harvard Law School, and Yale Law School, among others. Before joining the State Department, Mr. Pearsall was a lawyer in in private practice in New York. He served as a law clerk for the ICC in Paris after a judicial externship for the Hon. Sonya Sotomayor in the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Mr. Pearsall earned his J.D. from Columbia Law School, serving as head articles editor for the Columbia Journal of Transnational Law and senior editor for the American Review of International Arbitration. He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Columbia College. In addition to Mr. Pearsall, Jenner & Block has hired five lawyers into the partnership from government since January, including Ian Gershengorn (DC, September 2017 start), David Bitkower (DC), Kali Bracey (DC), Brandon Fox (LA), and Howard Symons (DC). The firm has a long tradition of its lawyers moving between private law and government service. ABOUT JENNER & BLOCK'S PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW PRACTICE Jenner & Block's Public International Law Practice provides counsel on international disputes, treaty interpretation, and global investment protection. The practice offers pre-dispute strategies for resolving matters prior to litigation or arbitration, and representation in negotiations between sovereigns and private entities.  We also represent clients in the enforcement and implementation of international agreements, both investment and commercial, and have successfully served as counsel to both sovereign states and claimants in disputes under the rules of the International Center for the Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID), Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA), International Court of Arbitration (ICC), and United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL). In addition to providing clients with strategic counsel on all aspects of international disputes and negotiations, our lawyers work seamlessly with the firm's other practice groups, providing insight into how international law affects trade, commerce and public policy, both domestically and abroad. ABOUT JENNER & BLOCK'S INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION PRACTICE Jenner & Block's lawyers frequently act for parties in international commercial arbitrations seated in Europe, North America and Asia, both ad hoc and administered by numerous arbitral institutions. The firm uses best-in-class legal analysis, skillful advocacy and decades of international and domestic experience to obtain successful outcomes for our clients in arbitrations worldwide.  Chambers USA has said of the practice, "Market sources admire this terrific disputes team: 'It quickly identifies the weakness in the other party's case and goes after it to win.'"  In 2015, the practice was ranked as a "Tier 1" practice, nationally, by U.S. News-Best Lawyers, in its annual ranking of more than 9,600 law firms across the country. Our lawyers have particular experience advising in relation to disputes in the financial services, real estate, energy and resources, construction, defense, telecommunications, automotive, healthcare and life sciences/pharmaceutical sectors.  Our international arbitration lawyers have acted in cross-border commercial and investment arbitrations administered by institutions, including the London Court of International Arbitration (LCIA), International Court of Arbitrations (ICC), International Centre for the Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID), American Arbitration Association/ International Centre for Dispute Resolution (AAA/ICDR) and the Arbitration Institute of the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce (SCC). ABOUT JENNER & BLOCK Jenner & Block (www.jenner.com) is a law firm with global reach, with more than 500 lawyers and offices in Chicago, London, Los Angeles, New York and Washington, DC.  The firm is known for its prominent and successful litigation practice and experience handling sophisticated and high-profile corporate transactions.  Firm clients include Fortune 100 companies, large privately held corporations, financial services institutions, emerging companies and venture capital and private equity investors.  In 2016, The American Lawyer named Jenner & Block to the A-List, which recognizes the top 20 US law firms.  The American Lawyer also recognized the firm as the #1 pro bono firm in the United States six of the past nine years; the firm has been ranked among the top 10 in this category every year since 1990. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/us-chief-of-investment-arbitration-joins-jenner--block-and-chairs-new-public-international-law-practice-300462256.html


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Lubbock, Texas, May 10, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The food safety experts in the Texas Tech University Department of Animal and Food Sciences have earned a reputation worldwide for their expertise in developing safe practices to the food industry and helping developing nations to enhance and secure their food supply. The department houses the International Center for Food Industry and Excellence (ICFIE), a collaborative effort between the College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources and the College of Human Sciences to emphasize food safety, value-added processing, nutrition and outreach and education. Texas Tech’s food safety laboratories are unmatched anywhere else in the world and the research developed there has made a difference in the quality and safety of food in all corners of the globe. That reach just stretched a little farther. Texas Tech announced on Wednesday two significant philanthropic investments from Cargill and Teys Australia to support research in meat science. Cargill will donate $750,000 to establish the Cargill Endowed Professorship in Sustainable Meat Science while Teys Australia, a partnership between the Teys family and Cargill, is making a $2 million gift to support research in meat science at Texas Tech. Both gifts represent a strategic and significant investment in the Department of Animal and Food Sciences. “We are grateful for the investment Cargill and Teys Australia have made to help Texas Tech University provide world-class expertise ensuring a plentiful and reliable food source,” Chancellor Robert L. Duncan said. “Philanthropy is how we advance higher education. The generosity of these gifts allows us to continue serving as global leaders in animal and food sciences.” Sustainable meat science is research that looks at the production of meat animals and the processing of those animals into high-quality, nutritious protein sources to improve the quality of life and health of global consumers using production systems that are sustainable, environmentally friendly, nutritious and affordable. By investing in Texas Tech, Teys Australia hopes to address real-world challenges that impact not only Australia but also other countries around the world. “These investments from two of the world’s agricultural leaders reflect the confidence the industry has in our research and our people,” said Lawrence Schovanec, Texas Tech president. “Texas Tech University continues to increase its global profile through its education of our students and innovations in research. We are grateful to Cargill and Teys Australia for their commitment to higher education and ensuring we continue making a difference through our research.” Mark Miller, a professor and San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo Distinguished Chair in Meat Science at Texas Tech, said the investment by Cargill and Teys Australia will allow experts to work on a more global scale to develop and research issues in meat science. The gifts will enable Texas Tech to develop future leaders committed to making meat sciences sustainable on a global level. “The Cargill and Teys representatives see Texas Tech’s students, faculty and staff as world-class, and they want to partner with us as a result of the people we have in our program,” Miller said. “Establishing an endowed faculty position to focus on and address the needs of meat production sustainability on a global scale will lay the groundwork to ensure that research continues and partnerships are strengthened between students and future employers.” A family business begun in 1946, Teys provides quality beef products in Australia and has grown into the second-largest meat processor and exporter in the country. Dedicated to “Feeding People, Enriching Lives,” Teys Australia embodies an unwavering commitment to the success and sustainability of its 4,500 employees, customers, suppliers and the communities in which it operates. Teys does this by providing beef and value-added meat products in the Australian market and to customers in more than 60 countries. “Teys Australia is delighted to make this contribution to Texas Tech for the advancement of meat science, food safety and capability,” said Tom Maguire, general manager of Corporate Services for Teys Australia. “After a worldwide search, Teys has identified Texas Tech as a global leader in meat science and food safety research, and we are pleased to be able to support these efforts. “Teys Australia has been in business in Australia for 71 years and recognizes that its future success depends on its ability to adapt to rapidly changing consumer preferences, technology and global competition. The work done at Texas Tech equips our meat industry, through research and development of future talent, to best respond to this. We are pleased to contribute to these endeavors.” Cargill’s Wichita, Kansas-based North America protein business employs 28,000 people, mainly in the U.S. and Canada, and encompasses nearly 60 facilities, including primary and further processing plants, feed mills, hatcheries, an innovation center, sales offices and distribution centers.  Leveraging its expertise in research and development, innovation, food safety, animal welfare, sustainability, culinary services, consumer insights and other aspects of meat production, Cargill’s protein group is focused on delivering results that help grow its customers’ businesses. “Cargill’s long-standing collaborative relationship with the Texas Tech meat science department makes the university a perfect choice for the creation of an endowed professorship focused on improving sustainable beef production for future generations,” said Brian Sikes, Cargill corporate vice president and president of the company’s North America protein business. “Research tells us global demand for animal protein will continue to increase, and the beef sustainability work that will be done at Texas Tech complements our efforts as a founding member of the global, U.S. and Canadian beef sustainability roundtables. Together, we will work toward meeting the demand for sustainable beef that will come from more than 9 billion people who will populate the planet by 2050. This is a win-win situation for Texas Tech, Cargill, the beef industry, our customers and consumers around the world.” Steve Fraze, interim dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources, said today’s announcement demonstrates the worldwide reach of the meat science program. “Gifts of this magnitude for the meat science program from Teys Australia and Cargill validate our reputation both nationally and internationally for the quality of our programs, both teaching and research, we have in the College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources at Texas Tech University,” Fraze said. Texas Tech provides innovation, research and technology transfer across the four pillars of food security – access, availability, stability and utilization. It has performed extensive research into numerous food safety issues, including E. coli, antimicrobial drug resistance in cattle and battling Johne’s disease in dairy cattle, a disease that affects the small intestine of ruminant animals and can be fatal. Texas Tech’s food safety experts also have partnered with the Mexican meat industry to establish pathogen baselines in Mexican meat and have helped establish guidelines and develop meat nutrition in countries throughout Africa and New Zealand. The ICFIE also serves as a National Surveillance Laboratory for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System Retail Meat Surveillance Program, thanks to a federal grant. Cargill provides food, agriculture, financial and industrial products and services to the world. Together with farmers, customers, governments, academia and communities, Cargill helps people and communities thrive by applying its insights and more than 150 years of experience. The company has 150,000 employees in 70 countries who are committed to feeding the world in a safe, responsible and sustainable way, reducing environmental impact and improving communities where it has a presence.  For more information, visit the company’s website. Find Texas Tech news, experts and story ideas at Texas Tech Today Media Resources or follow us on Twitter. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/659b57db-c99c-4d05-853a-3430a2fbe3f6


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: news.europawire.eu

In the framework of the ICERR program (International Center based on Research Reactors), a delegation of 15 experts from nine countries visited CEA facilities from April 24th to 28th. Gif-sur-Yvette, France, 09-May-2017 — /EuropaWire/ — The delegation was received at the Saclay and Cadarache centers to discover the research facilities of the CEA covered by this IAEA program. These include the research reactors Jules Horowitz (currently under construction at the Cadarache center), Orphée, Isis, Eole and Minerve (critical mock-ups dedicated to the study of reactor cores) as well as the study laboratories LECI and LECA. The ICERR program is designed to assist IAEA member states by accelerating access to existing research reactor infrastructure to carry out nuclear research and development and scientific capacity-building. As an introduction to this visit, organized with the support of the IAEA, Anne Lazar-Sury, Director of International Relations of the CEA and Governor for France at the IAEA, expressed the wish that this visit of the CEA’s facilities would pave the way for a long-term cooperation with the countries represented. The CEA is the first organization to benefit, since 2015, from the ICERR accreditation issued by the IAEA. It has already signed several ICERR agreements with research bodies in Morocco, Tunisia and Slovenia in September 2016, Indonesia in March 2017 and Algeria in April 2017. The delegation was composed by representatives from Saudi Arabia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Burma, Jordan, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Vietnam.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Lubbock, Texas, May 10, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The food safety experts in the Texas Tech University Department of Animal and Food Sciences have earned a reputation worldwide for their expertise in developing safe practices to the food industry and helping developing nations to enhance and secure their food supply. The department houses the International Center for Food Industry and Excellence (ICFIE), a collaborative effort between the College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources and the College of Human Sciences to emphasize food safety, value-added processing, nutrition and outreach and education. Texas Tech’s food safety laboratories are unmatched anywhere else in the world and the research developed there has made a difference in the quality and safety of food in all corners of the globe. That reach just stretched a little farther. Texas Tech announced on Wednesday two significant philanthropic investments from Cargill and Teys Australia to support research in meat science. Cargill will donate $750,000 to establish the Cargill Endowed Professorship in Sustainable Meat Science while Teys Australia, a partnership between the Teys family and Cargill, is making a $2 million gift to support research in meat science at Texas Tech. Both gifts represent a strategic and significant investment in the Department of Animal and Food Sciences. “We are grateful for the investment Cargill and Teys Australia have made to help Texas Tech University provide world-class expertise ensuring a plentiful and reliable food source,” Chancellor Robert L. Duncan said. “Philanthropy is how we advance higher education. The generosity of these gifts allows us to continue serving as global leaders in animal and food sciences.” Sustainable meat science is research that looks at the production of meat animals and the processing of those animals into high-quality, nutritious protein sources to improve the quality of life and health of global consumers using production systems that are sustainable, environmentally friendly, nutritious and affordable. By investing in Texas Tech, Teys Australia hopes to address real-world challenges that impact not only Australia but also other countries around the world. “These investments from two of the world’s agricultural leaders reflect the confidence the industry has in our research and our people,” said Lawrence Schovanec, Texas Tech president. “Texas Tech University continues to increase its global profile through its education of our students and innovations in research. We are grateful to Cargill and Teys Australia for their commitment to higher education and ensuring we continue making a difference through our research.” Mark Miller, a professor and San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo Distinguished Chair in Meat Science at Texas Tech, said the investment by Cargill and Teys Australia will allow experts to work on a more global scale to develop and research issues in meat science. The gifts will enable Texas Tech to develop future leaders committed to making meat sciences sustainable on a global level. “The Cargill and Teys representatives see Texas Tech’s students, faculty and staff as world-class, and they want to partner with us as a result of the people we have in our program,” Miller said. “Establishing an endowed faculty position to focus on and address the needs of meat production sustainability on a global scale will lay the groundwork to ensure that research continues and partnerships are strengthened between students and future employers.” A family business begun in 1946, Teys provides quality beef products in Australia and has grown into the second-largest meat processor and exporter in the country. Dedicated to “Feeding People, Enriching Lives,” Teys Australia embodies an unwavering commitment to the success and sustainability of its 4,500 employees, customers, suppliers and the communities in which it operates. Teys does this by providing beef and value-added meat products in the Australian market and to customers in more than 60 countries. “Teys Australia is delighted to make this contribution to Texas Tech for the advancement of meat science, food safety and capability,” said Tom Maguire, general manager of Corporate Services for Teys Australia. “After a worldwide search, Teys has identified Texas Tech as a global leader in meat science and food safety research, and we are pleased to be able to support these efforts. “Teys Australia has been in business in Australia for 71 years and recognizes that its future success depends on its ability to adapt to rapidly changing consumer preferences, technology and global competition. The work done at Texas Tech equips our meat industry, through research and development of future talent, to best respond to this. We are pleased to contribute to these endeavors.” Cargill’s Wichita, Kansas-based North America protein business employs 28,000 people, mainly in the U.S. and Canada, and encompasses nearly 60 facilities, including primary and further processing plants, feed mills, hatcheries, an innovation center, sales offices and distribution centers.  Leveraging its expertise in research and development, innovation, food safety, animal welfare, sustainability, culinary services, consumer insights and other aspects of meat production, Cargill’s protein group is focused on delivering results that help grow its customers’ businesses. “Cargill’s long-standing collaborative relationship with the Texas Tech meat science department makes the university a perfect choice for the creation of an endowed professorship focused on improving sustainable beef production for future generations,” said Brian Sikes, Cargill corporate vice president and president of the company’s North America protein business. “Research tells us global demand for animal protein will continue to increase, and the beef sustainability work that will be done at Texas Tech complements our efforts as a founding member of the global, U.S. and Canadian beef sustainability roundtables. Together, we will work toward meeting the demand for sustainable beef that will come from more than 9 billion people who will populate the planet by 2050. This is a win-win situation for Texas Tech, Cargill, the beef industry, our customers and consumers around the world.” Steve Fraze, interim dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources, said today’s announcement demonstrates the worldwide reach of the meat science program. “Gifts of this magnitude for the meat science program from Teys Australia and Cargill validate our reputation both nationally and internationally for the quality of our programs, both teaching and research, we have in the College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources at Texas Tech University,” Fraze said. Texas Tech provides innovation, research and technology transfer across the four pillars of food security – access, availability, stability and utilization. It has performed extensive research into numerous food safety issues, including E. coli, antimicrobial drug resistance in cattle and battling Johne’s disease in dairy cattle, a disease that affects the small intestine of ruminant animals and can be fatal. Texas Tech’s food safety experts also have partnered with the Mexican meat industry to establish pathogen baselines in Mexican meat and have helped establish guidelines and develop meat nutrition in countries throughout Africa and New Zealand. The ICFIE also serves as a National Surveillance Laboratory for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System Retail Meat Surveillance Program, thanks to a federal grant. Cargill provides food, agriculture, financial and industrial products and services to the world. Together with farmers, customers, governments, academia and communities, Cargill helps people and communities thrive by applying its insights and more than 150 years of experience. The company has 150,000 employees in 70 countries who are committed to feeding the world in a safe, responsible and sustainable way, reducing environmental impact and improving communities where it has a presence.  For more information, visit the company’s website. Find Texas Tech news, experts and story ideas at Texas Tech Today Media Resources or follow us on Twitter. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/659b57db-c99c-4d05-853a-3430a2fbe3f6


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Lubbock, Texas, May 10, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The food safety experts in the Texas Tech University Department of Animal and Food Sciences have earned a reputation worldwide for their expertise in developing safe practices to the food industry and helping developing nations to enhance and secure their food supply. The department houses the International Center for Food Industry and Excellence (ICFIE), a collaborative effort between the College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources and the College of Human Sciences to emphasize food safety, value-added processing, nutrition and outreach and education. Texas Tech’s food safety laboratories are unmatched anywhere else in the world and the research developed there has made a difference in the quality and safety of food in all corners of the globe. That reach just stretched a little farther. Texas Tech announced on Wednesday two significant philanthropic investments from Cargill and Teys Australia to support research in meat science. Cargill will donate $750,000 to establish the Cargill Endowed Professorship in Sustainable Meat Science while Teys Australia, a partnership between the Teys family and Cargill, is making a $2 million gift to support research in meat science at Texas Tech. Both gifts represent a strategic and significant investment in the Department of Animal and Food Sciences. “We are grateful for the investment Cargill and Teys Australia have made to help Texas Tech University provide world-class expertise ensuring a plentiful and reliable food source,” Chancellor Robert L. Duncan said. “Philanthropy is how we advance higher education. The generosity of these gifts allows us to continue serving as global leaders in animal and food sciences.” Sustainable meat science is research that looks at the production of meat animals and the processing of those animals into high-quality, nutritious protein sources to improve the quality of life and health of global consumers using production systems that are sustainable, environmentally friendly, nutritious and affordable. By investing in Texas Tech, Teys Australia hopes to address real-world challenges that impact not only Australia but also other countries around the world. “These investments from two of the world’s agricultural leaders reflect the confidence the industry has in our research and our people,” said Lawrence Schovanec, Texas Tech president. “Texas Tech University continues to increase its global profile through its education of our students and innovations in research. We are grateful to Cargill and Teys Australia for their commitment to higher education and ensuring we continue making a difference through our research.” Mark Miller, a professor and San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo Distinguished Chair in Meat Science at Texas Tech, said the investment by Cargill and Teys Australia will allow experts to work on a more global scale to develop and research issues in meat science. The gifts will enable Texas Tech to develop future leaders committed to making meat sciences sustainable on a global level. “The Cargill and Teys representatives see Texas Tech’s students, faculty and staff as world-class, and they want to partner with us as a result of the people we have in our program,” Miller said. “Establishing an endowed faculty position to focus on and address the needs of meat production sustainability on a global scale will lay the groundwork to ensure that research continues and partnerships are strengthened between students and future employers.” A family business begun in 1946, Teys provides quality beef products in Australia and has grown into the second-largest meat processor and exporter in the country. Dedicated to “Feeding People, Enriching Lives,” Teys Australia embodies an unwavering commitment to the success and sustainability of its 4,500 employees, customers, suppliers and the communities in which it operates. Teys does this by providing beef and value-added meat products in the Australian market and to customers in more than 60 countries. “Teys Australia is delighted to make this contribution to Texas Tech for the advancement of meat science, food safety and capability,” said Tom Maguire, general manager of Corporate Services for Teys Australia. “After a worldwide search, Teys has identified Texas Tech as a global leader in meat science and food safety research, and we are pleased to be able to support these efforts. “Teys Australia has been in business in Australia for 71 years and recognizes that its future success depends on its ability to adapt to rapidly changing consumer preferences, technology and global competition. The work done at Texas Tech equips our meat industry, through research and development of future talent, to best respond to this. We are pleased to contribute to these endeavors.” Cargill’s Wichita, Kansas-based North America protein business employs 28,000 people, mainly in the U.S. and Canada, and encompasses nearly 60 facilities, including primary and further processing plants, feed mills, hatcheries, an innovation center, sales offices and distribution centers.  Leveraging its expertise in research and development, innovation, food safety, animal welfare, sustainability, culinary services, consumer insights and other aspects of meat production, Cargill’s protein group is focused on delivering results that help grow its customers’ businesses. “Cargill’s long-standing collaborative relationship with the Texas Tech meat science department makes the university a perfect choice for the creation of an endowed professorship focused on improving sustainable beef production for future generations,” said Brian Sikes, Cargill corporate vice president and president of the company’s North America protein business. “Research tells us global demand for animal protein will continue to increase, and the beef sustainability work that will be done at Texas Tech complements our efforts as a founding member of the global, U.S. and Canadian beef sustainability roundtables. Together, we will work toward meeting the demand for sustainable beef that will come from more than 9 billion people who will populate the planet by 2050. This is a win-win situation for Texas Tech, Cargill, the beef industry, our customers and consumers around the world.” Steve Fraze, interim dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources, said today’s announcement demonstrates the worldwide reach of the meat science program. “Gifts of this magnitude for the meat science program from Teys Australia and Cargill validate our reputation both nationally and internationally for the quality of our programs, both teaching and research, we have in the College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources at Texas Tech University,” Fraze said. Texas Tech provides innovation, research and technology transfer across the four pillars of food security – access, availability, stability and utilization. It has performed extensive research into numerous food safety issues, including E. coli, antimicrobial drug resistance in cattle and battling Johne’s disease in dairy cattle, a disease that affects the small intestine of ruminant animals and can be fatal. Texas Tech’s food safety experts also have partnered with the Mexican meat industry to establish pathogen baselines in Mexican meat and have helped establish guidelines and develop meat nutrition in countries throughout Africa and New Zealand. The ICFIE also serves as a National Surveillance Laboratory for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System Retail Meat Surveillance Program, thanks to a federal grant. Cargill provides food, agriculture, financial and industrial products and services to the world. Together with farmers, customers, governments, academia and communities, Cargill helps people and communities thrive by applying its insights and more than 150 years of experience. The company has 150,000 employees in 70 countries who are committed to feeding the world in a safe, responsible and sustainable way, reducing environmental impact and improving communities where it has a presence.  For more information, visit the company’s website. Find Texas Tech news, experts and story ideas at Texas Tech Today Media Resources or follow us on Twitter. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/659b57db-c99c-4d05-853a-3430a2fbe3f6

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