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The International Atomic Energy Agency is an international organization that seeks to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy, and to inhibit its use for any military purpose, including nuclear weapons. The IAEA was established as an autonomous organization on 29 July 1957. Though established independently of the United Nations through its own international treaty, the IAEA Statute, the IAEA reports to both the United Nations General Assembly and Security Council.The IAEA has its headquarters in Vienna, Austria. The IAEA has two "Regional Safeguards Offices" which are located in Toronto, Canada, and in Tokyo, Japan. The IAEA also has two liaison offices which are located in New York City, United States, and in Geneva, Switzerland. In addition, the IAEA has three laboratories located in Vienna and Seibersdorf, Austria, and in Monaco.The IAEA serves as an intergovernmental forum for scientific and technical cooperation in the peaceful use of nuclear technology and nuclear power worldwide. The programs of the IAEA encourage the development of the peaceful applications of nuclear technology, provide international safeguards against misuse of nuclear technology and nuclear materials, and promote nuclear safety and nuclear security standards and their implementation.The IAEA and its former Director General, Mohamed ElBaradei, were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on 7 October 2005. The IAEA's current Director General is Yukiya Amano. Wikipedia.


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BEIJING (Reuters) - The nuclear energy industry needs an annual investment of $80 billion in order to meet climate change goals, the director of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said on Friday.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

The UK nuclear industry has issued its strongest warning yet to ministers on the problems it faces if the government is unable to strike new international atomic power deals during Brexit talks. Failure to put in place alternative arrangements to replace the existing European nuclear treaty, Euratom, which the UK is quitting as part of the article 50 process, would have a “dramatic impact” on Hinkley Point C and other new power stations around the country, the industry said. Ministers must avoid a “cliff edge” when the UK exits Euratom or face “major disruption to business across the whole nuclear fuel cycle”, the Nuclear Industry Association will warn the government on Wednesday. The stark briefing to officials, seen by the Guardian, comes just a day after MPs said the continued operations of the UK nuclear industry were at risk from exiting the Euratom treaty. A Lords committee on Tuesday also said the UK risked losing access to markets and skills when leaving Euratom. Tom Greatrex, the chief executive of the NIA, said: “We’ve had today two select committee reports that have both touched on this. The industry has been and is clear to government we are ready to do what we can – but it needs the government to get on with this and engage now, regardless of all the other issues they have to deal with.” Theresa May’s decision to call a general election had made matters worse, he added, because it had squeezed the time available to establish alternatives to the treaty. Euratom was first signed in 1957 by Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg and the Netherlands, and covers nuclear power station inspections, trade of materials and research. The UK’s departure will mean the government needs to agree a new inspections regime with the International Atomic Energy Agency to replace Euratom inspectors. “If the UK has not replaced the Euratom safeguards regime with its own system by the time it left Euratom, normal business could be disrupted right across the nuclear industry,” the NIA paper said. Falling back on World Trade Organisation standards would risk putting the UK in breach of its obligations in international nuclear law, the organisation added. Nuclear cooperation agreements (NCAs) would also need to be put in place with key nuclear countries outside the EU, including the US, Japan and Australia, because the UK’s agreements with those governments are currently based on its membership of Euratom. The report said: “Leaving the Euratom treaty without alternative arrangements in place would have a dramatic impact on the nuclear industry including the UK’s new build plans, existing operations and the waste and decommissioning sector which all depend, to some extent, on cooperation with nuclear states.” Greatrex said that matters were complicated by the fact that things had to be done in sequence, rather than in parallel. The new safeguards and inspection regime needed to be in place before the NCAs were struck, for example. Nuclear experts said that despite the dire warnings, the industry was not exaggerating the risks. Dame Sue Ion, honorary president of the Nuclear Skills Academy and former chair of the Nuclear Innovation Research Advisory Board, said: “It’s absolutely real [the impact if alternatives are not in place]. It literally does mean you cannot move material or IP [intellectual property] or services or components or medical isotopes.” She was echoed by Rupert Cowen, a senior nuclear energy lawyer at Prospect Law. “I don’t think they’re overstating the case,” he told the Guardian. Cowen was critical of officials in government who he called “ignorant” of the impact of leaving Euratom and who “think it’ll be alright on the night. It won’t.” The NIA urged the government to give “strong consideration” to remaining a member of Euratom if it had not thrashed out new deals and arrangements by the end of the two-year window triggered by article 50.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.fao.org

After a four-year eradication programme including nuclear techniques, the Niayes region of Senegal is now almost free of the tsetse fly, which used to decimate livestock. The tsetse fly is a bloodsucking insect that kills more than three million livestock in sub-Saharan Africa every year, causing more than US $4 billion annually in losses. It transmits parasites that cause a wasting disease called nagana in cattle. In some parts of Africa the fly also causes over 75 000 cases of human ‘sleeping sickness’, which affects the central nervous system, and causes disorientation, personality changes, slurred speech, seizures, difficulty walking and talking, and ultimately death. A multiyear programme of the Government of Senegal, with financial help from the United States and technical support from the Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD), France, is slowly eradicating the tsetse fly using a method called the Sterile Insect Technique. The programme is supported by FAO through its joint division with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. A campaign against the tsetse fly, a pest that transmits a disease that devastates livestock, in the Niayes area near the capital Dakar  started four years ago paving the way for complete eradication of this pest. “I have not seen a single tsetse fly for a year now,” said cattle farmer Oumar Sow. “This is in contrast to earlier, when they increased in numbers, especially during the cold season. The flies were really a nuisance to our animals and we had to carefully select the time for milking. Now, there is no problem with that.” Eradicating reproduction Senegal has successfully integrated an insect birth control technique using irradiation to sterilize male flies, reducing the fly population over time. The technique has already eradicated the fly population in one area in the Niayes, suppressed it in another by 98 per cent, while the technique will be implemented in a third area in 2016, said Baba Sall, Project Manager at Senegal’s Ministry of Livestock and Animal Production. “Eradicating the flies will significantly improve food security, and contribute to socio-economic progress,” Sall said, adding that research on 227 farms has indicated that the income of the rural population in Niayes will increase by 30 per cent. “Life has become more comfortable not only for the animals, but also for the farmers,” says Loulou Mendy, a pig farmer in the area. “Now, we can even sleep out in the open. This was unthinkable before because of the tsetse bites.” One of the 38 African countries infested with the tsetse fly, Senegal has a total infested area of around 60 000 square km. The operational phase of the campaign against the tsetse fly started in the Niayes region near the capital Dakar in 2011. This region was selected by the Senegalese Government, as it is particularly suitable for breeds of cattle that produce more milk and meat than cattle in other areas. However, the high incidence of livestock infertility and weight loss, due to nagana, resulted in reduced meat and milk production, and cattle that were too frail to plough the land or transport produce, which in turn severely affected crop production, according to Marc Vreysen, Head of the Insect Pest Control Laboratory at the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. Sterilization using nuclear techniques shows positive effects Sterilization using nuclear techniques is most effective under exactly these circumstances: when the fly population has been reduced significantly using conventional techniques but there are still pockets of insects left, Vreysen explained. “The sterilized male flies will seek out the virgin females wherever they are,” he said. “This will lead to complete elimination of the population in these areas.” The project in Senegal started with a feasibility study initiated in 2006, supported by the IAEA, FAO, the International Cooperation Centre of Agricultural Research for Development (CIRAD), and the Government of Senegal through the Senegalese Institute for Agricultural Research and the Directorate for Veterinary Services to assess the possibility of creating a tsetse-free zone in the Niayes region. The study found that 28.7 per cent of cattle had devastating health problems due to the tsetse fly. The release of sterile male flies began in 2012, after a three-year period of pilot trials, training, preparation and population suppression. The science behind birth control for flies The sterile insect technique (SIT) is a form of pest control that uses ionizing radiation to sterilize male flies that are mass-produced in special rearing facilities. The sterile males are released systematically from the ground or by air in tsetse-infested areas, where they mate with wild females, which do not produce offspring. As a result, this technique can eventually eradicate populations of wild flies. The SIT is among the most environmentally friendly control tactics available, and is usually applied as the final component of an integrated campaign to remove insect populations. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division supports about 40 SIT field projects delivered through the IAEA technical cooperation programme, like the one in Senegal, in different parts of Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America. It has supported the successful eradication of the tsetse fly from the island of Unguja, Zanzibar while in Ethiopia it has reduced the fly population by 90 per cent in parts of the Southern Rift valley.


FAO is implementing a US$1 million project, funded by the Government of Italy, which focuses on improving food security in sub-Saharan Africa by supporting the progressive reduction of tsetse-transmitted trypanosomoses. African trypanosomoses are parasitic diseases of animals and humans alike. The animal form, called nagana, and the human form, called sleeping sickness, affect the health, livelihoods and development prospects of millions of people. Trypanosomoses also hinder the optimal utilization of some of the most fertile lands in sub-Saharan Africa Currently, the six countries that receive priority assistance from the project are: Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda in Eastern Africa, and Burkina Faso, Ghana and Mali in Western Africa. In Ethiopia, FAO is piloting innovative integrated packages to improve animal health and to boost animal production in tsetse infested areas. Livestock Protective Fences combined with improved animal feeding and more efficient husbandry practices will help to increase production and productivity, with positive impacts on food security and on the generation of cash income for the rural poor. Capacity development and technical assistance to the affected countries are focused on: Project achievements already include the training of 120 staff from 13 trypanosomosis affected countries in data management, risk assessment and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for planning, execution and monitoring of field interventions. Also, advanced technical support was provided to a wide range of stakeholders at the international and national levels. The project supports the development, piloting and dissemination of innovative technologies that increase the cost-effectiveness and impact of field interventions against trypanosomoses. Innovation is promoted both at the field level (e.g. Livestock Protective Fence) and at the level of planning, management and monitoring of field interventions. Emphasis is placed on Information Technology and GIS. Data harmonization, dissemination and sharing among affected countries is also promoted and facilitated, thus contributing to coherent and synergistic regional interventions. FAO provides support to the World Health Organization (WHO) and its partners in their efforts to eliminate human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, also known as sleeping sickness). Joint WHO/FAO activities have led to the development of the Atlas of HAT, which enables the organizations to monitor the population at risk and its coverage by the health systems in affected countries. A WHO Expert Committee has recognized the Atlas of HAT as a crucial component for the control and elimination of HAT. The project also believes in empowering African countries and institutions, aiming at building a core of qualified and committed staff in affected countries, who can guide the planning, implementation and monitoring of field interventions against trypanosomoses. To this end, FAO supports African counterparts in generating high-profile scientific publications, which ensure a high quality of field activities and maximize dissemination among, and up-take by, other affected countries. Working in partnership FAO delivers its assistance to affected countries in close collaboration with other international organizations mandated to tackle trypanosomoses in the African region. In particular, the Pan-African Tsetse and Trypanosomosis Eradication Campaign (PATTEC) of the African Union (AU) is receiving priority and direct assistance. Strong collaborations also link FAO activities to those of WHO and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), in the framework of the Programme Against African Trypanosomosis (PAAT). The project plans to scale up and out its achievements by disseminating the innovative technologies to a greater number of beneficiary countries and stakeholders. It also envisages consolidating its results by ensuring adequate follow-up on capacity development activities.


Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation (ENEC) confirmed this morning that it had completed construction for its first of four large nuclear units. It also announced that the initial operation of the plant will be delayed until sometime in 2018 to allow sufficient time to gain more operational experience and obtain national and international readiness reviews. That announcement confirmed what unnamed sources had leaked yesterday. ENEC's press release started with the good news; along with its partner, the Korean Electric Power Corporation, ENEC has completed construction and Hot Functional Tests of Barakah Unit 1 within the initially budgeted time and cost. That is an impressive accomplishment for a country that began pursuing nuclear energy development in earnest only a decade ago. There is every reason to be proud and excited about achieving the milestone of having completed the immensely challenging task of building a first of a kind large nuclear plant under some rather challenging conditions. The project has required the skilled management and task coordination of a massive, international, multilingual work force in a dusty, occasionally unbearably hot location. Even though the completed unit is not the lead plant for the APR1400 series, it was begun long before the first APR1400 construction project was completed. Lessons from that construction effort were learned just in time to apply them to Barakah 1. Unfortunately, there was a two-plus year delay in achieving initial criticality and commercial operations at Shin Kori 3; a portion of that delay will cascade to Barakah 1 because it reduced the time available to gain operational experience. The bottom line of ENEC's announcement was that the ENEC Board of Directors had approved a new project timeline that shifted fuel loading and initial criticality of the facility from May 2017 to sometime in 2018. As the company explained, ENEC also announced the approval by its Board of Directors of a timeline update for the start-up of Unit 1, driven by a desire to achieve the highest possible nuclear quality and safety standards. The approval follows a series of assessments by ENEC, Nawah and international experts, as well as lessons learned from Shin Kori Unit 3 in South Korea, the reference plant for Barakah. The timeline includes an extension for the start-up of nuclear operations for Unit 1, from 2017 to 2018, to ensure sufficient time for international assessments and adherence to nuclear industry safety standards, as well as a reinforcement of operational proficiency for plant personnel. Instead of looking at the announcement of a significant operational delay as bad news and one more example of what is wrong with nuclear energy technology, it is more accurate to view the announcement as one more example of the fact that the UAE is following through with its commitments to the international community. From the time that the decision was made to pursue nuclear energy development, leaders in the UAE have consistently asserted that they would apply the most rigorous set of standards to the project to ensure that it establishes and maintains an positive international reputation. They have committed to subject their program to intensive reviews, both the mandatory ones from their national regulator and voluntary ones from international bodies like the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO). ENEC submitted its operating license application to the Federal Authority for Nuclear Regulation (FANR) in March of 2015 and is anticipating upcoming reviews by the IAEA and WANO. However, it is still working on operating procedures and operator training events that need to be completed and proven adequate before regulators can be satisfied that the company is ready to load fuel and begin critical operations. Nawah is the joint venture between ENEC and Kepco that will be the operating company licensed by FANR. “Nawah is currently working with the IAEA and WANO on the approach and timetable for their operational readiness assessments at Barakah later this year. These assessments will take place before we anticipate being granted our Operating License by FANR and begin the process of loading fuel assemblies into the reactor. The entire Nawah team is fully aligned around the objective of safe, reliable, and efficient operation of the first nuclear energy plant in the UAE,” said Mohammed Sahoo AlSuwaidi, Acting CEO of Nawah. “As we move toward Unit 1 Fuel Load, we recognize the scale of both our responsibilities and of the challenges that lie ahead of us. Nawah’s commitment to meeting the highest standards of safety and quality in nuclear operations is what drives the work of all our personnel, who are striving to ensure that we meet FANR’s expectations and obtain regulatory approval to begin the start-up of Unit 1,” said AlSuwaidi. Nuclear energy development is not the place for taking shortcuts. Even if the layers upon layers of protective systems ensure that the public would be protected even in the event of a plant catastrophe, seemingly minor operator errors can have enormous financial consequences. A measured, careful pace with plenty of time for operator practice and procedure refinement is far better than a rush job. In the case of multibillion dollar facilities that will be in service for 60-100 years, a few months delay to get started correctly is a modest investment and a wise decision.


Receive press releases from The Knowledge Group: By Email Wojciech Z. Kornacki, Of Counsel, Watson & Associates LLC, to Speak at TKG’s The Iran Nuclear Deal Under Trump: What Oil Companies Should be Aware of Live Webcast New York, NY, May 02, 2017 --( For further details, please visit: https://www.theknowledgegroup.org/webcasts/legal/international-trade-law/the-iran-nuclear-deal-under-trump-what-oil-companies-should-be-aware-of-live-webcast About Wojciech Z. Kornacki Wojciech Kornacki is a Government Contract and Compliance Attorney (Of Counsel) of Watson and Associate’s Government Contracting Group assisting foreign and domestic corporations in the Washington D.C. Metro area. He practices Federal Government Procurement and Compliance law. He represents and counsels businesses in legal matters relating to the latest legislative updates and legal developments in the areas of federal compliance, bid protests, agency debarments, claims and appeals, trade agreements, and export controls, among other matters. Mr. Kornacki has written and lectured on legal topics relating to code of business ethics, and trade agreements act, compliance, among others. He is a member of the U.S. Court of Federal Claims Bar Association and the American Bar Association’s Government Procurement Committee. While on Active Duty, Mr. Kornacki served in the U.S. Army as a judge advocate where he defended Soldiers in court-martials, provided legal advice during military operations in Iraq, and drafted legal opinions on government contract and fiscal law matters. Mr. Kornacki was stationed in Germany, Iraq, and Virginia. He earned his Master of Studies from Oxford University, his Juris Doctorate from City University of New York School of Law at Queens College, and his Bachelor of Arts, Cum Laude, from Pace University. He is admitted to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces. His email address is kornackiw@theodorewatson.com and phone number 202.827.9750. About Watson & Associates LLC Watson & Associates LLC with its offices in Washington DC and Colorado focuses on representing domestic and international clients in virtually all aspects of federal government contract law and procurement matters. Our law firm’s attorneys frequently serve as outside counsel for various federal procurement and compliance matters, including investigations, litigation and appeals. Watson & Associates LLC was founded in 2003 by Theodore Watson who retired from the U.S. Air Force and desired to help companies in navigating through the complex regulatory framework of contracting with various federal agencies. Event Synopsis: President Donald Trump’s election has clouded the future of the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action between Iran and the P5+1 nations, which curtailed Iran’s ability to build nuclear weapons and in return eased certain economic sanctions imposed by the U.S., the EU and the UN Security Council. Trump vowed during his campaign to make it a priority of his presidency to dismantle the accord, calling it “one of the worst deals ever made.” Recent remarks by members of his administration suggest Trump is seeking renegotiation of key terms of the accord and exploring how to tighten enforcement, such as by insisting that the International Atomic Energy Agency demand access to Iran military sites. In this live Webcast, a panel of thought leaders brought together by The Knowledge Group will analyze the main features of the JCPOA, its most controversial provisions and the likelihood of the accord being altered or abrogated as a result of changing American policy towards the region. The potential impact on the oil and gas industry, due to Iran’s position in the oil production market, will also be analyzed. Key topics include: - Overview of Iran Nuclear Deal - Role of International Atomic Energy Agency - Current State of Compliance - Flash Points for U.S. Policy Shifts - Continuing Sanctions Against Iranian Interests - Effect of Iranian Withdrawal From Accord About The Knowledge Group, LLC/The Knowledge Congress Live Webcast Series The Knowledge Congress was established with the mission to produce unbiased, objective, and educational live webinars that examine industry trends and regulatory changes from a variety of different perspectives. The goal is to deliver a unique multilevel analysis of an important issue affecting business in a highly focused format. To contact or register to an event, please visit: http://theknowledgegroup.org/ New York, NY, May 02, 2017 --( PR.com )-- The Knowledge Group/The Knowledge Congress Live Webcast Series, the leading producer of regulatory focused webcasts, has announced today that Wojciech Z. Kornacki, Of Counsel, Watson & Associates LLC will speak at The Knowledge Group’s webcast entitled: “The Iran Nuclear Deal Under Trump: What Oil Companies Should Be Aware Of.” This event is scheduled for May 16, 2017 from 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM (ET).For further details, please visit:https://www.theknowledgegroup.org/webcasts/legal/international-trade-law/the-iran-nuclear-deal-under-trump-what-oil-companies-should-be-aware-of-live-webcastAbout Wojciech Z. KornackiWojciech Kornacki is a Government Contract and Compliance Attorney (Of Counsel) of Watson and Associate’s Government Contracting Group assisting foreign and domestic corporations in the Washington D.C. Metro area. He practices Federal Government Procurement and Compliance law. He represents and counsels businesses in legal matters relating to the latest legislative updates and legal developments in the areas of federal compliance, bid protests, agency debarments, claims and appeals, trade agreements, and export controls, among other matters. Mr. Kornacki has written and lectured on legal topics relating to code of business ethics, and trade agreements act, compliance, among others. He is a member of the U.S. Court of Federal Claims Bar Association and the American Bar Association’s Government Procurement Committee.While on Active Duty, Mr. Kornacki served in the U.S. Army as a judge advocate where he defended Soldiers in court-martials, provided legal advice during military operations in Iraq, and drafted legal opinions on government contract and fiscal law matters. Mr. Kornacki was stationed in Germany, Iraq, and Virginia.He earned his Master of Studies from Oxford University, his Juris Doctorate from City University of New York School of Law at Queens College, and his Bachelor of Arts, Cum Laude, from Pace University. He is admitted to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces. His email address is kornackiw@theodorewatson.com and phone number 202.827.9750.About Watson & Associates LLCWatson & Associates LLC with its offices in Washington DC and Colorado focuses on representing domestic and international clients in virtually all aspects of federal government contract law and procurement matters. Our law firm’s attorneys frequently serve as outside counsel for various federal procurement and compliance matters, including investigations, litigation and appeals. Watson & Associates LLC was founded in 2003 by Theodore Watson who retired from the U.S. Air Force and desired to help companies in navigating through the complex regulatory framework of contracting with various federal agencies.Event Synopsis:President Donald Trump’s election has clouded the future of the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action between Iran and the P5+1 nations, which curtailed Iran’s ability to build nuclear weapons and in return eased certain economic sanctions imposed by the U.S., the EU and the UN Security Council. Trump vowed during his campaign to make it a priority of his presidency to dismantle the accord, calling it “one of the worst deals ever made.” Recent remarks by members of his administration suggest Trump is seeking renegotiation of key terms of the accord and exploring how to tighten enforcement, such as by insisting that the International Atomic Energy Agency demand access to Iran military sites.In this live Webcast, a panel of thought leaders brought together by The Knowledge Group will analyze the main features of the JCPOA, its most controversial provisions and the likelihood of the accord being altered or abrogated as a result of changing American policy towards the region. The potential impact on the oil and gas industry, due to Iran’s position in the oil production market, will also be analyzed.Key topics include:- Overview of Iran Nuclear Deal- Role of International Atomic Energy Agency- Current State of Compliance- Flash Points for U.S. Policy Shifts- Continuing Sanctions Against Iranian Interests- Effect of Iranian Withdrawal From AccordAbout The Knowledge Group, LLC/The Knowledge Congress Live Webcast SeriesThe Knowledge Congress was established with the mission to produce unbiased, objective, and educational live webinars that examine industry trends and regulatory changes from a variety of different perspectives. The goal is to deliver a unique multilevel analysis of an important issue affecting business in a highly focused format. To contact or register to an event, please visit: http://theknowledgegroup.org/ Click here to view the company profile of The Knowledge Group Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from The Knowledge Group


News Article | May 7, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

As part of the Have-A-Heart campaign, Image Gently® — which encompasses more than 100 medical organizations in the United States and worldwide — and 13* additional leading U.S. medical societies recently endorsed "Radiation Safety in Children With Congenital and Acquired Heart Disease: A Scientific Position Statement on Multimodality Dose Optimization from the Image Gently Alliance." The groups urge pediatric imaging stakeholders to review the paper, which was published today in JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, and factor the content into both their clinical decision making and conversations with patients and providers. "This Image Gently Campaign is another opportunity for medical professionals to work together to equip providers with the latest information to guide medical decisions and help parents take an active, informed role in their child's health care. This is an example of what modern medicine is about," said Donald Frush, M.D., chair of the Image Gently Alliance and Image Gently liaison to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Physicians — If you suspect kids may have heart disease or need imaging to inform heart disease treatment, help families make informed decisions. "Children with congenital and acquired heart disease often require many medical imaging procedures, most of which involve radiation exposure. This exposure poses risks to the patient, including an increased lifetime risk of cancer. Cardiologists and radiologists should consider the risks and benefits of imaging procedures, the patient's previous radiation exposure, and the family's wishes when deciding on different imaging modalities," said Aimee Armstrong, MD, FACC, who leads the American College of Cardiology's radiation safety initiative within the National Cardiovascular Data Registry IMPACT Registry. "Experts from many specialties — pediatric and adult cardiologists, radiologists, physicists, imaging technicians and nurses — have come together to help maximize the benefits of cardiac imaging and minimize any risks. Children with heart disease often depend on these procedures, and it's our collective responsibility to perform them safely and effectively," said Kevin Hill, MD, co-chair of the Image Gently Have-A-Heart Campaign Committee. Parents — Be your child's advocate: Ask these questions if your child is prescribed a cardiac imaging exam. "Medical imaging is a wonder of modern medicine. These procedures help doctors quickly diagnose and treat cardiac conditions every day, but not all situations require imaging. The Image Gently tools help doctors and patients communicate to arrive at the best course of action for a child's condition and promote more patient-centered care," said Christopher Snyder, MD, FAAP, chair of the AAP Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery Section. "Cardiac imaging and interventional procedures play a critical, lifesaving role for children with heart disease. This campaign, developed by a broad range of experts in children's cardiac care, aims to provide doctors, families and patients with knowledge, tools and awareness to ensure that these procedures are performed in a way that optimizes the benefits of these exams and minimizes any associated risks," said Andrew Einstein, MD, PhD, co-chair of the Image Gently Have-A-Heart Campaign Committee. Imaging Providers — Kids with heart disease need special care. And like all children, they are more sensitive to radiation. So when these kids need imaging : "As the medical personnel who perform these procedures, radiologic technologists serve a key role in optimizing medical radiation dose by applying correct protocol for size and body type of the patient. This campaign allows us to reinforce technologists with resources to help them continue to provide excellent care," said Michael Latimer, M.S.R.S., R.T.(R), president of the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT). "Imaging exams provide vital information to help diagnose and treat cardiac conditions — including heart disease.  Providers need a firm understanding of the physics of these technologies to select imaging parameters that optimize radiation dose and minimize any potential risks," said Bruce H. Curran, MEng, FAAPM, FACMP, chair of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The Image Gently Alliance website and Image Gently Parents website contains the latest research and educational materials to aid radiologists, radiologic technologists, medical physicists and other imaging stakeholders in determining the appropriate radiation techniques to be used in the imaging of children and how the radiation received from these exams may affect pediatric patients over time. Health care providers are urged to visit the Image Gently Alliance site and pledge to do their part to image gently. * American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) American College of Radiology (ACR) American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) Society for Pediatric Radiology (SPR) American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) American College of Cardiology (ACC) American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging (NASCI Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society (PACES) Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/medical-groups-join-forces-to-improve-cardiac-imaging-use-in-children-300452468.html

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