International Atomic Energy Agency

www.iaea.org
Vienna, Austria

The International Atomic Energy Agency is an international organization that seeks to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy, and to inhibit its use for any military purpose, including nuclear weapons. The IAEA was established as an autonomous organization on 29 July 1957. Though established independently of the United Nations through its own international treaty, the IAEA Statute, the IAEA reports to both the United Nations General Assembly and Security Council.The IAEA has its headquarters in Vienna, Austria. The IAEA has two "Regional Safeguards Offices" which are located in Toronto, Canada, and in Tokyo, Japan. The IAEA also has two liaison offices which are located in New York City, United States, and in Geneva, Switzerland. In addition, the IAEA has three laboratories located in Vienna and Seibersdorf, Austria, and in Monaco.The IAEA serves as an intergovernmental forum for scientific and technical cooperation in the peaceful use of nuclear technology and nuclear power worldwide. The programs of the IAEA encourage the development of the peaceful applications of nuclear technology, provide international safeguards against misuse of nuclear technology and nuclear materials, and promote nuclear safety and nuclear security standards and their implementation.The IAEA and its former Director General, Mohamed ElBaradei, were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on 7 October 2005. The IAEA's current Director General is Yukiya Amano. Wikipedia.

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Receive press releases from The Knowledge Group: By Email Wojciech Z. Kornacki, Of Counsel, Watson & Associates LLC, to Speak at TKG’s The Iran Nuclear Deal Under Trump: What Oil Companies Should be Aware of Live Webcast New York, NY, May 02, 2017 --( For further details, please visit: https://www.theknowledgegroup.org/webcasts/legal/international-trade-law/the-iran-nuclear-deal-under-trump-what-oil-companies-should-be-aware-of-live-webcast About Wojciech Z. Kornacki Wojciech Kornacki is a Government Contract and Compliance Attorney (Of Counsel) of Watson and Associate’s Government Contracting Group assisting foreign and domestic corporations in the Washington D.C. Metro area. He practices Federal Government Procurement and Compliance law. He represents and counsels businesses in legal matters relating to the latest legislative updates and legal developments in the areas of federal compliance, bid protests, agency debarments, claims and appeals, trade agreements, and export controls, among other matters. Mr. Kornacki has written and lectured on legal topics relating to code of business ethics, and trade agreements act, compliance, among others. He is a member of the U.S. Court of Federal Claims Bar Association and the American Bar Association’s Government Procurement Committee. While on Active Duty, Mr. Kornacki served in the U.S. Army as a judge advocate where he defended Soldiers in court-martials, provided legal advice during military operations in Iraq, and drafted legal opinions on government contract and fiscal law matters. Mr. Kornacki was stationed in Germany, Iraq, and Virginia. He earned his Master of Studies from Oxford University, his Juris Doctorate from City University of New York School of Law at Queens College, and his Bachelor of Arts, Cum Laude, from Pace University. He is admitted to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces. His email address is kornackiw@theodorewatson.com and phone number 202.827.9750. About Watson & Associates LLC Watson & Associates LLC with its offices in Washington DC and Colorado focuses on representing domestic and international clients in virtually all aspects of federal government contract law and procurement matters. Our law firm’s attorneys frequently serve as outside counsel for various federal procurement and compliance matters, including investigations, litigation and appeals. Watson & Associates LLC was founded in 2003 by Theodore Watson who retired from the U.S. Air Force and desired to help companies in navigating through the complex regulatory framework of contracting with various federal agencies. Event Synopsis: President Donald Trump’s election has clouded the future of the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action between Iran and the P5+1 nations, which curtailed Iran’s ability to build nuclear weapons and in return eased certain economic sanctions imposed by the U.S., the EU and the UN Security Council. Trump vowed during his campaign to make it a priority of his presidency to dismantle the accord, calling it “one of the worst deals ever made.” Recent remarks by members of his administration suggest Trump is seeking renegotiation of key terms of the accord and exploring how to tighten enforcement, such as by insisting that the International Atomic Energy Agency demand access to Iran military sites. In this live Webcast, a panel of thought leaders brought together by The Knowledge Group will analyze the main features of the JCPOA, its most controversial provisions and the likelihood of the accord being altered or abrogated as a result of changing American policy towards the region. The potential impact on the oil and gas industry, due to Iran’s position in the oil production market, will also be analyzed. Key topics include: - Overview of Iran Nuclear Deal - Role of International Atomic Energy Agency - Current State of Compliance - Flash Points for U.S. Policy Shifts - Continuing Sanctions Against Iranian Interests - Effect of Iranian Withdrawal From Accord About The Knowledge Group, LLC/The Knowledge Congress Live Webcast Series The Knowledge Congress was established with the mission to produce unbiased, objective, and educational live webinars that examine industry trends and regulatory changes from a variety of different perspectives. The goal is to deliver a unique multilevel analysis of an important issue affecting business in a highly focused format. To contact or register to an event, please visit: http://theknowledgegroup.org/ New York, NY, May 02, 2017 --( PR.com )-- The Knowledge Group/The Knowledge Congress Live Webcast Series, the leading producer of regulatory focused webcasts, has announced today that Wojciech Z. Kornacki, Of Counsel, Watson & Associates LLC will speak at The Knowledge Group’s webcast entitled: “The Iran Nuclear Deal Under Trump: What Oil Companies Should Be Aware Of.” This event is scheduled for May 16, 2017 from 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM (ET).For further details, please visit:https://www.theknowledgegroup.org/webcasts/legal/international-trade-law/the-iran-nuclear-deal-under-trump-what-oil-companies-should-be-aware-of-live-webcastAbout Wojciech Z. KornackiWojciech Kornacki is a Government Contract and Compliance Attorney (Of Counsel) of Watson and Associate’s Government Contracting Group assisting foreign and domestic corporations in the Washington D.C. Metro area. He practices Federal Government Procurement and Compliance law. He represents and counsels businesses in legal matters relating to the latest legislative updates and legal developments in the areas of federal compliance, bid protests, agency debarments, claims and appeals, trade agreements, and export controls, among other matters. Mr. Kornacki has written and lectured on legal topics relating to code of business ethics, and trade agreements act, compliance, among others. He is a member of the U.S. Court of Federal Claims Bar Association and the American Bar Association’s Government Procurement Committee.While on Active Duty, Mr. Kornacki served in the U.S. Army as a judge advocate where he defended Soldiers in court-martials, provided legal advice during military operations in Iraq, and drafted legal opinions on government contract and fiscal law matters. Mr. Kornacki was stationed in Germany, Iraq, and Virginia.He earned his Master of Studies from Oxford University, his Juris Doctorate from City University of New York School of Law at Queens College, and his Bachelor of Arts, Cum Laude, from Pace University. He is admitted to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces. His email address is kornackiw@theodorewatson.com and phone number 202.827.9750.About Watson & Associates LLCWatson & Associates LLC with its offices in Washington DC and Colorado focuses on representing domestic and international clients in virtually all aspects of federal government contract law and procurement matters. Our law firm’s attorneys frequently serve as outside counsel for various federal procurement and compliance matters, including investigations, litigation and appeals. Watson & Associates LLC was founded in 2003 by Theodore Watson who retired from the U.S. Air Force and desired to help companies in navigating through the complex regulatory framework of contracting with various federal agencies.Event Synopsis:President Donald Trump’s election has clouded the future of the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action between Iran and the P5+1 nations, which curtailed Iran’s ability to build nuclear weapons and in return eased certain economic sanctions imposed by the U.S., the EU and the UN Security Council. Trump vowed during his campaign to make it a priority of his presidency to dismantle the accord, calling it “one of the worst deals ever made.” Recent remarks by members of his administration suggest Trump is seeking renegotiation of key terms of the accord and exploring how to tighten enforcement, such as by insisting that the International Atomic Energy Agency demand access to Iran military sites.In this live Webcast, a panel of thought leaders brought together by The Knowledge Group will analyze the main features of the JCPOA, its most controversial provisions and the likelihood of the accord being altered or abrogated as a result of changing American policy towards the region. The potential impact on the oil and gas industry, due to Iran’s position in the oil production market, will also be analyzed.Key topics include:- Overview of Iran Nuclear Deal- Role of International Atomic Energy Agency- Current State of Compliance- Flash Points for U.S. Policy Shifts- Continuing Sanctions Against Iranian Interests- Effect of Iranian Withdrawal From AccordAbout The Knowledge Group, LLC/The Knowledge Congress Live Webcast SeriesThe Knowledge Congress was established with the mission to produce unbiased, objective, and educational live webinars that examine industry trends and regulatory changes from a variety of different perspectives. The goal is to deliver a unique multilevel analysis of an important issue affecting business in a highly focused format. To contact or register to an event, please visit: http://theknowledgegroup.org/ Click here to view the company profile of The Knowledge Group Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from The Knowledge Group


BEIJING (Reuters) - The nuclear energy industry needs an annual investment of $80 billion in order to meet climate change goals, the director of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said on Friday.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

BETHESDA, MD, May 11, 2017-- Wolfgang Lothar Wiese is a celebrated Marquis Who's Who biographee. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Marquis Who's Who, the world's premier publisher of biographical profiles, is proud to name Dr. Wiese a Lifetime Achiever. An accomplished listee, Dr. Wiese celebrates many years' experience in his professional network, and has been noted for achievements, leadership qualities, and the credentials and successes he has accrued in his field.In the field of atomic physics, Dr. Wolfgang Wiese is an accomplished scientist and author with decades of experience. Highly regarded for his work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Dr. Wiese has been very productive as a researcher and has also led the NIST plasma spectroscopy section and, since 1977, the NIST Atomic Physics Division, which at his retirement in 2004 consisted of 65 Ph.D. scientists. Since then, he has remained at NIST as a contractor and research associate.Drawn to physcs at an early age, Dr. Wiese took to education to explore his passion. He earned a doctorate at the University of Kiel, Germany, in 1957, then moved to the USA as a junior faculty member at the University of Maryland, and from there in 1960 to NIST, where he spent essentially all of his career. In addition to leading the above noted research groups, he has been personally involved in high precision measurements of the shapes of the famous Balmer spectral lines of hydrogen under very controlled plasma environments, very similar to those of stellar atmospheres and the sun. These measurements are to this day still the yardstick for all theoretically calculated Balmer line shapes. Dr. Wiese also discovered and analyzed regularities and systematic trends in atomic oscillator strengths, especially for isoelectronic transitions from neutral to highly ionized atoms, and he has been one of the pioneers in developing a critically evaluated database for large numbers of atomic and ionic transitions of all chemical elements. With several co-workers, he produced six data volumes on atomic oscillator strengths, also known as Einstein A-coefficients, covering most chemical elements with their ions, of which two have been cited as "Citation Classics", each being cited more than 3000 times.Overall, his scientific work is recorded in more than 250 publications, including 15 book chapters. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the Optical Society of America, and the Washington Academy of Sciences, a member of the International Astronomical Union, and has been a long standing member of the atomic data committee of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria. He has been a visiting scientist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, the Ruhr University and the University of Rostock, all in Germany, and the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research in Tokyo.Awards:Silver Medal and Gold Medal, U. S. Department of Commerce, 1962 and 1971Guggenheim Fellow, 1966Humboldt Award, 1986Distinguished Career in Science Award, Washington Academy of Sciences, 1992Allen W. Astin Measurement Science Award, 1992Honorary Doctorate, University of Kiel, Germany, 1993Distinguished Postdoctoral Award, University of Maryland, 2003About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.mining-journal.com

Lithium hopeful Ardiden (AU:ADV) was one of five companies to gain 42.9% over seven days to top this week’s list of Australian and Hong Kong-listed market risers. Ardiden was up thanks to news earlier this week of thick, high-grade lithium hits at its Seymour Lake project in Ontario. Asian shares scaled two-year highs today while the dollar and US bond yields slipped after the US Federal Reserve signalled a cautious approach to future rate hikes and the reduction of its $4.5 trillion of bond holdings, Reuters reported. Chinese shares bounced back after a fall yesterday on Moody’s downgrade of the country’s credit rating. Among the other four up 42.9%, explorer GB Energy rose on news it would start drilling at its Mt Denison copper-gold-uranium project in South Australia. News mid-month that Japan’s Takahama nuclear power plant was due to restart in June was a likely boost to the sector, with uranium hopeful Bannerman Resources (AU:BMN) up 35.1% for the week despite no news since its quarterly report a month ago, when it said it was well-positioned “within an environment of improving uranium sector sentiment”. And Greenland Minerals and Energy (GGG) was up 30% for the week following a visit to its proposed Kvanefjeld uranium and rare earths project by International Atomic Energy Agency and government officials this month. Finally, explorer Impact Minerals (AU:IPT), which has announced priority drill targets at its gold-silver-zinc-lead-copper Commonwealth project in New South Wales, gained 33.3% for the week.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.engineeringnews.co.za

National Nuclear Regulator (NNR) CEO Dr Bismark Tyobeka has been elected to serve as president of the sixth review meeting of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. The joint convention was adopted on September 5, 1997, and entered into force on June 18, 2001, establishing an international peer review process among contracting parties and providing incentives for nations to take appropriate steps to bring their nuclear activities into compliance with general safety standards and practices. South Africa acceded to the joint convention on November 15, 2006. Tyobeka will work closely with the convention’s two VPs – Geoff Williams from the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency and Douglas Tonkay, from the US Department of Energy – to encourage constructive discussions on key issues faced by parties to the convention. He will also engage with regional networks, in particular those that form part of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Global Nuclear Safety and Security Network to assist member States, who are not already contracting parties to the joint convention to become contracting parties.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.theenergycollective.com

Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation (ENEC) confirmed last week that it had completed construction for its first of four large nuclear units. It also announced that the initial operation of the plant will be delayed until sometime in 2018 to allow sufficient time to gain more operational experience and obtain national and international readiness reviews. After those reviews have been successfully completed, the UAE nuclear regulator – Federal Authority for Nuclear Regulation (FANR) – will issue an operating license to allow fuel to be loaded into the reactor. ENEC’s press release started with the good news; along with its partner, the Korean Electric Power Corporation, ENEC has completed construction and Hot Functional Tests of Barakah Unit 1 within the initially budgeted time and cost. That is an impressive accomplishment for a country that began pursuing nuclear energy development in earnest only a decade ago. There is every reason to be proud and excited about achieving the milestone of having completed the immensely challenging task of building a first of a kind large nuclear plant under some rather challenging conditions. The project has required the skilled management and task coordination of a massive, international, multilingual work force in a dusty, occasionally unbearably hot location. Even though the completed unit is not the lead plant for the APR1400 series, it was begun long before the first APR1400 construction project was completed. Lessons from that construction effort were learned just in time to apply them to Barakah 1. Unfortunately, there was a two-plus year delay in achieving initial criticality and commercial operations at Shin Kori 3; a portion of that delay will cascade to Barakah 1 because it reduced the time available to gain operational experience. The bottom line of ENEC’s announcement was that the ENEC Board of Directors had approved a new project timeline that shifted fuel loading and initial criticality of the facility from May 2017 to sometime in 2018. As the company explained, ENEC also announced the approval by its Board of Directors of a timeline update for the start-up of Unit 1, driven by a desire to achieve the highest possible nuclear quality and safety standards. The approval follows a series of assessments by ENEC, Nawah and international experts, as well as lessons learned from Shin Kori Unit 3 in South Korea, the reference plant for Barakah. The timeline includes an extension for the start-up of nuclear operations for Unit 1, from 2017 to 2018, to ensure sufficient time for international assessments and adherence to nuclear industry safety standards, as well as a reinforcement of operational proficiency for plant personnel. Instead of looking at the announcement of a significant operational delay as bad news and one more example of what is wrong with nuclear energy technology, it is more accurate to view the announcement as one more example of the fact that the UAE is following through with its commitments to the international community. From the time that the decision was made to pursue nuclear energy development, leaders in the UAE have consistently asserted that they would apply the most rigorous set of standards to the project to ensure that it establishes and maintains an positive international reputation. They have committed to subject their program to intensive reviews, both the mandatory ones from their national regulator and voluntary ones from international bodies like the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO). ENEC submitted its operating license application to the Federal Authority for Nuclear Regulation (FANR) in March of 2015 and is anticipating upcoming reviews by the IAEA and WANO. However, it is still working on operating procedures and operator training events that need to be completed and proven adequate before regulators can be satisfied that the company is ready to load fuel and begin critical operations. Nawah is the joint venture between ENEC and Kepco that will be the operating company licensed by FANR. “Nawah is currently working with the IAEA and WANO on the approach and timetable for their operational readiness assessments at Barakah later this year. These assessments will take place before we anticipate being granted our Operating License by FANR and begin the process of loading fuel assemblies into the reactor. The entire Nawah team is fully aligned around the objective of safe, reliable, and efficient operation of the first nuclear energy plant in the UAE,” said Mohammed Sahoo AlSuwaidi, Acting CEO of Nawah. “As we move toward Unit 1 Fuel Load, we recognize the scale of both our responsibilities and of the challenges that lie ahead of us. Nawah’s commitment to meeting the highest standards of safety and quality in nuclear operations is what drives the work of all our personnel, who are striving to ensure that we meet FANR’s expectations and obtain regulatory approval to begin the start-up of Unit 1,” said AlSuwaidi. Nuclear energy development is not the place for taking shortcuts. Even if the layers upon layers of protective systems ensure that the public would be protected even in the event of a plant catastrophe, seemingly minor operator errors can have enormous financial consequences. A measured, careful pace with plenty of time for operator practice and procedure refinement is far better than a rush job. In the case of multibillion dollar facilities that will be in service for 60-100 years, a few months delay to get started correctly is a modest investment and a wise decision. Note: A version of the above was first published by Forbes.com. It is republished here with permission. The post Emirates Nuclear Announces Construction Completion And Operational Delay For First Nuclear Unit appeared first on Atomic Insights.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) announced this week a partnership with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to boost efforts to improve the care of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) globally. This partnership will facilitate access to nuclear cardiology training courses and educational materials for professionals in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). LMICs face the highest burden of CVDs, as more than 75 percent of all CVD deaths occur in these countries. The organizations will also collaborate on the development of interactive educational materials for the IAEA’s website Human Health Campus. “ASNC is very pleased to work as a partner with the IAEA in providing nuclear cardiology educational resources to help physicians worldwide provide the best care for their patients,” said ASNC President Raymond Russell, MD, FASNC. “This agreement sets the groundwork for future collaborative projects to improve further the delivery of nuclear cardiac testing.” CVDs kill more than 17.5 million people annually, accounting for 31 percent of all global deaths. More people die due to CVDs worldwide than any other single cause. Nuclear cardiology plays a fundamental role in the diagnosis and management of patients with CVDs. ASNC and IAEA have been partners in educating medical professionals in the advances of nuclear cardiology since 2013 with their first joint webinar series. ASNC’s work with the support of the IAEA has helped reach physicians worldwide to facilitate education in nuclear cardiology and best practices. “Today’s signing of the practical arrangement between the IAEA and the ASNC heralds an expansion of collaboration and an increase of educational opportunities for professionals in nuclear cardiology worldwide,” said Diana Paez, Head of the IAEA’s Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging Section (NMDI) at the IAEA. “Moreover, it will enable access to continuing medical education, with the ultimate goal of improving the quality of services provided to their patients.” ASNC is the recognized leader in quality, education, advocacy and standards in cardiovascular imaging, with more than 4,000 members worldwide. ASNC is the only society dedicated solely to advocacy issues that impact the field of nuclear cardiology and is working with success to influence regulations to fight onerous private health plan policies – adverting reimbursement declines and fighting for improved payment and coverage. ASNC is dedicated to continuous quality improvement, education and patient-centered imaging, illustrating the ongoing commitment as a leader in the field of nuclear imaging and improving patient outcomes. ASNC establishes standards for excellence in cardiovascular imaging through the development of clinical guidelines, professional education, advocacy and research development. ASNC’s members are comprised of cardiologists, radiologists, physicians, scientists, technologists, imaging specialists and other professionals committed to the science and practice of nuclear cardiology. For more information, visit http://www.asnc.org.


Vienna, Austria - 9 May 2017: A study in 65 countries has revealed low adoption of International Atomic Energy Agency recommendations to reduce nuclear cardiology radiation exposure. The research is presented today at ICNC 2017 by Dr Edward Hulten, a cardiologist at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, USA.1 Nuclear cardiology uses small amounts of radioactive tracers which are injected into the veins and taken up by the heart. A gamma camera images the radiation from the tracer. The cardiac images are used to measure the heart size and function, identify coronary heart disease, and predict the risk of a heart attack. Dr Hulten said: "Nuclear cardiology is a key part of contemporary cardiology management and around 15 to 20 million procedures are performed annually. It gives information regarding diagnosis, prognosis, and the effects of therapeutic interventions." "Concerns have been raised about tests, including nuclear cardiology, that expose patients to ionising medical radiation," he continued. "Medical radiation potentially raises the lifetime risk of cancer which is important for all patients, especially younger patients or when considering additional radiation over time from further medical studies." A goal of 9 mSv or less radiation exposure per scan was recommended by the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) in 2010. It was noted in a 2016 International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) nuclear cardiology guideline but not formally endorsed as a recommendation.2, 3 The IAEA developed eight quality metrics for responsible radiation use in nuclear cardiology: avoiding thallium 201 stress testing, avoiding dual isotope testing, avoiding too much technetium-99m and thallium 201, using stress only imaging, use of camera technologies to reduce dose, use of weight based dosing strategies for technetium-99m, and avoiding inappropriate dosing that can lead to "shine-through" artefacts. The IAEA Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Study (INCAPS) assessed adherence to the eight quality metrics. The present analysis investigated which metrics were most helpful in meeting the ASNC's 9 mSv target. During one week in 2013, 308 nuclear cardiology laboratories were studied in 65 countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, North America, and Oceania. The survey included 7 911 nuclear cardiology scans. There was significant variability in adherence to the quality metrics across laboratories and regions. There was low adherence overall, with the majority of sites implementing less than half of the quality metrics. When the researchers performed multivariable logistic regression analysis, they found that the practices most strongly associated with achieving a 9 mSv or less scan were the use of stress or rest only imaging, avoiding thallium, and use of camera technologies to reduce radiation dose. Dr Hulten said: "When the 9 mSv recommendation was made in 2010 it was suggested that it should be achieved in 50% of scans by 2014. The INCAPS survey shows that there is still work to do. It is possible to reduce radiation exposure with existing techniques. Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) cameras are more sensitive and allow for reduced dose scanning. With certain tracers you can achieve 1 mSv or less. But some scans use more than 30 mSv, so there is huge variability." Not every site has all of the hardware and technology, said Dr Hulten, so the first step is to look at what is possible within each lab. He said: "There are improvements every lab can make regardless of money - for example multiple position imaging, weight based dosing and stress only techniques. They do require adapting existing workflows which takes leadership but they should be feasible in most labs." He added: "Eventually cameras wear out and perhaps the decision on a replacement could factor in a reduced radiation dose which also lowers false positive tests and has the potential to reduce lab costs." Dr Hulten concluded: "The INCAPS survey is a crucial step towards improving patient care in the field of nuclear cardiology by quantifying worldwide adherence to best practices. Any test involving ionising radiation will increase cancers within a population but the risk must be weighed against the benefit of gaining information about heart disease. The 9 mSv goal is achievable, and the lower the better."


News Article | September 11, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

US President Donald Trump is due to decide by October 15 whether to re-certify sanctions relief given to Iran under the 2015 nuclear deal (AFP Photo/ATTA KENARE) Vienna (AFP) - The UN atomic watchdog hit back Monday at US criticism of the Iran nuclear deal, insisting its inspections there are the world's toughest and that Tehran is sticking to the accord. "The nuclear-related commitments undertaken by Iran under (the 2015 accord) are being implemented," International Atomic Energy Agency head Yukiya Amano told reporters. "The verification regime in Iran is the most robust regime which is currently existing. We have increased the inspection days in Iran, we have increased inspector numbers... and the number of images has increased," he said in Vienna. "From a verification point of view, it is a clear and significant gain." US President Donald Trump has called the agreement between Iran and six major powers reducing its nuclear activities in exchange for sanctions relief "the worst deal ever negotiated". Trump has to certify in mid-October whether he believes Iran is abiding by the nuclear deal and that sticking to it is vital to US national security interests. If, as seems increasingly likely, Trump decides not to give the green light, Congress will then have 60 days to debate whether to re-impose sanctions on Iran. Trump's UN envoy, Nikki Haley, has been particularly critical, saying it was wrong to strike a deal ignoring Iran's missile programme and support for "terrorist" groups. Haley, who held talks with Amano in Vienna on August 23, has also said that the IAEA is not able to carry out "anytime, anywhere" inspections. "How do we know Iran is complying with the deal, if inspectors are not allowed to look everywhere they should look?," she said in Washington on September 5. In fact, the IAEA has conducted at least 400 inspections of sites in Iran and 25 so-called "complimentary access" visits -- snap inspections requested at short notice -- since the deal came into force in January 2016. These visits fall under the "Additional Protocol" agreement between Iran and the IAEA, which Tehran has been provisionally applying since 2016. The IAEA data on these inspections, revealed in its 2016 Safeguards Implementation Report seen by AFP, however does not specify whether these sites are military or civilian. "We have already have many complimentary access (visits) in Iran after the Implementation Day (when the deal entered into force) and we will contune to have many complimentary access (visits) in Iran," Amano said on Monday.


Rehani M.M.,International Atomic Energy Agency
American Journal of Roentgenology | Year: 2013

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to presage the upcoming challenges in the area of radiation protection of patients in imaging for different stakeholders, such as dosimetrists, radiation biologists, patients, referring physicians, radiologists, radiographers, medical physicists, and manufacturers. CONCLUSION. Most of the challenges facing different stakeholders are actually based on the contribution required from industry; thus, manufacturers play the greatest role in making patients safer in this century. © American Roentgen Ray Society.

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