International Atomic Energy Agency

www.iaea.org
Vienna, Austria

The International Atomic Energy Agency is an international organization that seeks to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy, and to inhibit its use for any military purpose, including nuclear weapons. The IAEA was established as an autonomous organization on 29 July 1957. Though established independently of the United Nations through its own international treaty, the IAEA Statute, the IAEA reports to both the United Nations General Assembly and Security Council.The IAEA has its headquarters in Vienna, Austria. The IAEA has two "Regional Safeguards Offices" which are located in Toronto, Canada, and in Tokyo, Japan. The IAEA also has two liaison offices which are located in New York City, United States, and in Geneva, Switzerland. In addition, the IAEA has three laboratories located in Vienna and Seibersdorf, Austria, and in Monaco.The IAEA serves as an intergovernmental forum for scientific and technical cooperation in the peaceful use of nuclear technology and nuclear power worldwide. The programs of the IAEA encourage the development of the peaceful applications of nuclear technology, provide international safeguards against misuse of nuclear technology and nuclear materials, and promote nuclear safety and nuclear security standards and their implementation.The IAEA and its former Director General, Mohamed ElBaradei, were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on 7 October 2005. The IAEA's current Director General is Yukiya Amano. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

LONDON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Technavio analysts forecast the global nuclear protective clothing market to reach USD 275.23 million by 2021, according to their latest report. The research study covers the present scenario and growth prospects of the global nuclear protective clothing market for 2017-2021. The report further segments the market based on application (power plants and research) and geography (the Americas, APAC, and EMEA). The nuclear industry poses several threats, including emission of hazardous radiation and severe nuclear accidents. In the past, incidents such as Chernobyl in Ukraine and Fukushima in Japan disasters have added to the safety concerns in the industry. The highly-regulated nature of the nuclear industry has driven the market for nuclear protective clothing, globally. International organizations, such as International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), promote the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and publishes both standards and recommendations for radiation safety. Looking for more information on this market? Request a free sample report Technavio’s sample reports are free of charge and contain multiple sections of the report including the market size and forecast, drivers, challenges, trends, and more. Technavio analysts highlight the following three factors that are contributing to the growth of the global nuclear protective clothing market: The occurrence of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation is very common in nuclear power plants and nuclear research institutes. It is mandatory to protect the workers from getting exposed to harmful radiations while working at nuclear power plants and research labs. This radiation can cause deterministic effects, leading to harmful tissue reactions, causing radiation sickness, and stochastic effects, which are severe effects caused by radiation on an individual leading to hereditary effects and cancer. Sayani Roy, a lead power research analyst at Technavio, says, “ICRP, IAEA, and ICRU are the three international organizations that recommend radiation protection levels. These organizations define the requirements for safety and healthy work environment including the use of protective clothing.” The operating of about 243 research reactors in 55 countries globally is driving the growth of protective clothing for safer handling of radioactive particulates. These research reactors are smaller than nuclear power plants and are not used for power generation. University campuses harbor most of the nuclear research labs. The year 2016 shows the presence of 243 operational research reactors, out of which 89 are in the developing countries. “Research reactors have a wide range of applications, such as testing, analysis, and production of radioisotopes used in nuclear industry; fusion research; environmental science; and nuclear medicine. The high demand for protective clothing during applied research, which is carried out at various research centers around the world, where employees deal with hazardous particles, will drive the nuclear protective clothing market,” adds Sayani. Due to reasons such as high rate of personnel contamination events, the protective clothing used in the nuclear industry are majorly for single use. Single use protective garments reduce the chance of cross-contamination with radioactive particles. The garments are designed to minimize the penetration of radioactive particles and offer body coverage free of radioactive materials. There is a constant demand for disposable nuclear protective clothing because of the existence of operable nuclear plants as well as nuclear plants that are planned and under construction. Become a Technavio Insights member and access all three of these reports for a fraction of their original cost. As a Technavio Insights member, you will have immediate access to new reports as they’re published in addition to all 6,000+ existing reports covering segments like energy storage, oil and gas, and smart grid. This subscription nets you thousands in savings, while staying connected to Technavio’s constant transforming research library, helping you make informed business decisions more efficiently. Technavio is a leading global technology research and advisory company. The company develops over 2000 pieces of research every year, covering more than 500 technologies across 80 countries. Technavio has about 300 analysts globally who specialize in customized consulting and business research assignments across the latest leading edge technologies. Technavio analysts employ primary as well as secondary research techniques to ascertain the size and vendor landscape in a range of markets. Analysts obtain information using a combination of bottom-up and top-down approaches, besides using in-house market modeling tools and proprietary databases. They corroborate this data with the data obtained from various market participants and stakeholders across the value chain, including vendors, service providers, distributors, re-sellers, and end-users. If you are interested in more information, please contact our media team at media@technavio.com.


News Article | May 20, 2017
Site: www.forbes.com

The U.S. was the dominant force in the global civilian nuclear trade for decades, enjoying both the rewards and responsibilities that come along with that position. As pioneers in nuclear energy, the U.S. was able to develop world-class products and establish a successful export regime in the 1970’s and 1980’s. We are still making profits off of some of those earlier deals. Today, America has a multi-billion dollar nuclear energy industry that employs a domestic workforce of more than 100,000 people. At the same time, the U.S. has used its commercial leadership to establish global security standards. We have long been the largest contributor to the International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations nuclear non-proliferation watchdog. Figure Caption: About 70% of all new nuclear capacity coming online in the next 35 years will be in developing (non-OECD) nations, because growing demand for electricity is coupled with international commitments to cut CO2. The U.S. government also helps other nations with regulatory, safety, security, and innovation needs - even when there is no commercial benefit. We consistently put the safety and security interests of the global community first. This is what it means to be a responsible world leader. In recent decades, however, the U.S. has lost its edge as a global exporter. Our products have a harder time competing with all-inclusive deals offered by Russia’s state-supported industry and now face additional challenges from lower-cost Chinese clones. The U.S. needs a new policy strategy. Russia offers all-inclusive packages for new nuclear plants—covering the cost of constructing the reactor, training employees, operating the facility and even taking back used fuel. It’s hard to compete with that without direct support from one’s government. Russian and China have another advantage in the competition for market share—they choose not to adhere to the same standards as the U.S. and other top producers. Neither Russia nor China are members of the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), which sets guidelines that discourage larger, richer countries from taking unfair advantage of emerging nations in trade and business dealings. This puts us at a structural disadvantage in the global marketplace (see figure). Furthermore, Russian explicitly views the export of all energy resources and technologies as geostrategic tools. A good way to understand Russia’s civilian nuclear strategy is to look at the history of their oil and natural gas exports to Ukraine and the European Union via the Trans-Siberian and subsequent pipelines. Once these pipelines were established as a major source of energy for the region in the 1980’s, Russia’s influence grew exponentially. Russia has regularly used this influence to achieve diplomatic and economic goals, threatening to disrupt energy supplies and prices across much of Europe and Eurasia. Russia’s 2014 annexation of Crimea from Ukraine was mostly driven by its desire to maintain this control and regional influence. Right now, Russia is locking-in relationships with other countries of regional importance, including Turkey and Vietnam, cutting into U.S. diplomatic efforts. China is in an even more competitive position than Russia, because it has the cash on hand to make equity investments in large nuclear projects anywhere in the world. China is the new investor in the United Kingdom’s Hinkley Point nuclear project and may become a leading partner in the U.K’s Essex nuclear project. China has even designed a reactor specifically for export, their CAP1400 reactor, based on the design of Westinghouse’s popular AP1000, paralleling the way China quickly overtook the global manufacture of solar panels a decade ago. Leveraging U.S. intellectual property from companies seeking access to Chinese markets, undercutting competitors with low manufacturing costs, and later pushing U.S. producers out of the market, is the way China comes to dominate any market. Make no mistake - China’s emergence on the nuclear scene will be swift and dominating. The United States must decide to make civilian nuclear trade a national priority, and provide clear leadership across the many programs, offices, and agencies that will need to cooperate if we are to succeed. It is essential that we adhere to our safety principles, but we must also be nimble and efficient in order to thrive in an increasingly competitive market. Several steps we can do to address this problem include: - accelerate nuclear research, development and demonstration, and help to deploy small modular reactors - fix our Export-Import Bank that finances the export of American goods and services and makes us more competitive in the global market, like every other country has - give U.S. vendors a variety of financing options to meet the various needs of global purchasers - allow Congress and the Administration to consider creative ways to use existing programs, like including nuclear financing in global development efforts at U.S. AID and OPIC, and extending Department of Energy loan programs to international customers - define nuclear as a clean energy source and ensure its eligibility for as many funding mechanisms as possible to help more countries meet their climate goals, while giving U.S. nuclear vendors a fair opportunity to compete - look to our fellow OECD member nations for partnership and collaboration since France, the U.K., Korea, Japan, and Canada are all nuclear exporters who share our safety, security and democratic values - encourage Russia and China to comply with OECD rules From cell phones to solar panels, U.S. industries have pioneered countless high-value technologies that were ultimately replicated by foreign manufacturers who could undercut the cost and overtake the market with their government’s support. The good news is, we’re well positioned to deliver these new nuclear technologies and are further along than China and Russia in developing most of them, though both countries can overtake us pretty quickly if we fail to act. Since becoming the undisputed greatest, richest and most powerful nation on Earth in the 1980’s, the United States seems to have become complacent, almost willfully ignorant, of what it takes to remain the greatest nation on Earth. We need to be smart again. And no other area requires smart like nuclear. Dr. James Conca is an expert on energy, nuclear and dirty bombs, a planetary geologist, and a professional speaker. Follow him on Twitter @jimconca and see his book at Amazon.com


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Revenue from the sale of radiochemical products for the three months ended March 31, 2017 increased approximately 61%. The majority of the Company's sales within this segment are from the sale of sodium iodide. The increase in revenue in the period-to-period comparison is primarily the result of a major competitor stopping the supply of that product late in 2016. The Company also reported a 6% increase in gross profit percentage and an 87% increase in net profit for the segment for the period compared to the same period in 2016. Both increases were again attributed to the increased sales volume of the sodium iodide product. Revenue from the radiological services segment for the three months ended March 31, 2017 increased approximately 51% compared to the same period in 2016. Our radiological services segment consists of radiological field service work and gemstone processing. For the three months ended March 31, 2017, the majority of the increase in revenue was attributed to an increase in gemstone processing compared to the same period in 2016. Typically, the majority of our radiological services revenue is generated by the performance radiological field service activities in connection with the DOE's Orphan Source Recovery Program (OSRP), and the Company expects a significant increase in those contract opportunities during the remainder of 2017. Gross profit for this segment for the three months ended March 31, 2017 increased approximately 118% and net profit increased by approximately 142% compared to the same period in 2016. Both of those increases were the result of increased revenue within this segment. Revenue from the nuclear medicine standards segment for the three months ended March 31, 2017 decreased approximately 1% compared to the same period in 2016, primarily the result of decreased sales reported by our consolidated joint venture, TI Services L.L.C. Revenue within this segment produced from sales to RadQual under our exclusive contract manufacturing agreement increased 3% for the three months ended March 31, 2017 compared to the same period in 2016. In spite of the small decline in revenue within this segment, gross profit for our nuclear medicine standards segment increased approximately 11% for the three months ended March 31, 2017 compared to the same period in 2016, and net income for the segment increased by approximately 19% for the three months ended March 31, 2017 compared to the same period in 2016. The increase in gross and net profit was attributed to improvements in manufacturing efficiencies. Revenue from the sale of cobalt products for the three months ended March 31, 2017 decreased approximately 30% compared to the same period in 2016. Our cobalt sealed source manufacturing generates the majority of revenue in this segment and those source sales largely depend upon our ability to procure or produce high activity cobalt. Even though cobalt production at the Advanced Test reactor is underway the material will not be ready for use until 2018. Gross profit for cobalt products for the three months ended March 31, 2017 decreased approximately 32% compared to the same period in 2016, and net income for cobalt products decreased approximately 41% for the three months ended March 31, 2017, compared to the same period in 2016. The decrease in gross profit and net income within this segment was directly attributed to the decrease in revenue during the period. The Company consolidated cost of sales increased approximately 8% for the three months ended March 31, 2017 compared to the same period in 2016, and gross profit increased approximately 8% for the three months ended March 31, 2017 compared to the same period in 2016, thus maintaining a constant 44% gross profit percentage for both periods. Operating expense increased by approximately 43% for the three months ended March 31, 2017, compared to the same period in 2016 due primarily to the significant increase in general, administrative and consulting costs, specifically legal costs and facility licensing fees. Our net loss for the three months ended March 31, 2017 was $786,266, compared to $374,518, for the same period in 2016, an increase in loss of approximately 110%, and is primarily the result of increased operating expenses, as discussed above. Steve Laflin, President and CEO of the Company said, "We are very pleased with the strong performance of two of our major business segments during the first quarter this year and we believe there will be continued strong performance in these segments for the remainder of 2017. Specifically, within the radiological services segment we are seeing a significant increase in contract opportunities for various field service contracts both through the U.S. Department of Energy and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). We have already been successful in being awarded several of these contracts and that revenue will begin to be recognized in the second and third quarters of 2017. We also have other request for proposal responses in process that could produce additional significant revenues within this segment in 2017. In addition, we have secured some alternative sources of cobalt supply and should see resumption in cobalt source sales beginning in late 2017 or early 2018. Altogether, I believe this will result in a significant improvement in revenue for 2017." International Isotopes Inc. manufactures a full range of nuclear medicine calibration and reference standards, a variety of Cobalt-60 products, and provides a wide selection of radioisotopes and radiochemical for medical applications, calibration, and clinical research.  The Company also provides radiological services including source installation/removal, and decommissioning of various radiation units on a contract basis to clients. Certain statements in this press release are "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, including statements with respect to continued improved performance in the company business segments, revenue predictions for 2017, and obtaining additional contract opportunities for radiological field services.  Information contained in such forward-looking statements is based on current expectations and is subject to change.  These statements involve a number of risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual results, performance or achievements of International Isotopes Inc. to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements of the Company expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements.  Other factors, which could materially affect such forward-looking statements, can be found in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission at www.sec.gov, including its Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016.  Investors, potential investors, and other readers, are urged to consider these factors carefully in evaluating the forward-looking statements and are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements.  The forward-looking statements made herein are only made as of the date of this press release and International Isotopes, Inc. and the Company undertakes no obligation to publicly update such forward-looking statements to reflect subsequent events or circumstances. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/international-isotopes-inc-announces-financial-results-for-the-first-quarter-2017-300458411.html


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: cerncourier.com

In this book, Jean Bricmont aims to challenge Richard Feynman’s famous statement that “nobody understands quantum mechanics” and discusses some of the issues that have surrounded this field of theoretical physics since its inception. Bricmont starts by strongly criticising the “establishment” view of quantum mechanics (QM), known as the Copenhagen interpretation, which attributes a key role to the observer in a quantum measurement. The quantum-mechanical wavefunction, indeed, predicts the possible outcomes of a quantum measurement, but not which one of these actually occurs. The author opposes the idea that a conscious human mind is an essential part of the process of determining what outcome is obtained. This interpretation was proposed by some of the early thinkers on the subject, although I believe Bricmont is wrong to associate it with Niels Bohr, who relates the measurement with irreversible changes in the measuring apparatus, rather than in the mind of the human observer. The second chapter deals with the nature of the quantum state, illustrated with discussions of the Stern–Gerlach experiment to measure spin and the Mach–Zender interferometer to emphasise the importance of interference. During the last 20 years or so, much work has been done on “decoherence”. This has shown that the interaction of the quantum system with its environment, which may include the measuring apparatus, prevents any detectable interference between the states associated with different possible measurement outcomes. Bricmont correctly emphasises that this still does not result in a particular outcome being realised. The author’s central argument is presented in chapter five, where he discusses the de Broglie–Bohm hidden-variable theory. At its simplest, it proposes that there are two components to the quantum-mechanical state: the wavefunction and an actual point particle that always has a definite position, although this is hidden from observation until its position is measured. This model claims to resolve many of the conceptual problems thrown up by orthodox QM: in particular, the outcome of a measurement is determined by the position of the particle being measured, while the other possibilities implied by the wavefunction can be ignored because they are associated with “empty waves”. Bricmont shows how all the results of standard QM – particularly the statistical probabilities of different measurement outcomes – are faithfully reproduced by the de Broglie–Bohm theory. This is probably the clearest account of this theorem that I have come across. So why is the de Broglie–Bohm theory not generally accepted as the correct way to understand quantum physics? One reason follows from the work of John Bell, who showed that no hidden-variable theory can reproduce the quantum predictions (now thoroughly verified by experiment) for systems consisting of two or more particles in an entangled state unless the theory includes non-locality – i.e. a faster-than-light communication between the component particles and/or their associated wavefunctions. As this is clearly inconsistent with special relativity, many thinkers (including Bell himself) have looked elsewhere for a realistic interpretation of quantum phenomena. Not so Jean Bricmont: along with other contemporary supporters of the de Broglie–Bohm theory, he embraces non-locality and looks to use the idea to enhance our understanding of the reality he believes underlies quantum physics. In fact he devotes a whole chapter to this topic and claims that non-locality is an essential feature of quantum physics and not just of models based on hidden variables. Other problems with the de Broglie–Bohm theory are discussed and resolved – to the author’s satisfaction at least. These include how the de Broglie–Bohm model can be consistent with the Heisenberg uncertainty principle when it appears to assume that the particle always has a definite position and momentum; he points out that the statistical results of a large number of measurements always agree with conventional predictions, and these include the uncertainty principle. Alternative ways to interpret QM are presented, but the author does not find in them the same advantages as in the de Broglie–Bohm theory. In particular, he discusses the many-worlds interpretation, which assumes that the only reality is the wavefunction and that, rather than collapsing at a measurement, this produces branches that correspond to all measurement outcomes. One of the consequences of decoherence is that there can be no interaction between the possible measurements, and this means that no branch can be aware of any other. It follows that, even if a human observer is involved, each branch can contain a copy of him or her who is unaware of the others’ presence. From this point of view, all the possible measurement outcomes co-exist – hence the term “many worlds”. Apart from its ontological extravagance, the main difficulty with many-worlds theory is that it is very hard to see how the separate outcomes can have different probabilities when they all occur simultaneously. Many-worlds supporters have proposed solutions to this problem, which do not satisfy Bricmont (and, indeed, myself), who emphasises that this is not a problem for the de Broglie–Bohm theory. A chapter is also dedicated to a brief discussion of philosophy, concentrating on the concept of realism and how it contrasts with idealism. Unsurprisingly, it concludes that realists want a theory describing what happens at the micro scale that accounts for predictions made at the macro scale – and that de Broglie–Bohm provide just such a theory. The book concludes with an interesting account of the history of QM, including the famous Bohr–Einstein debate, the struggle of de Broglie and Bohm for recognition, and the influence of the politics of the time. This is a clearly written and interesting book. It has been very well researched, containing more than 500 references, and I would thoroughly recommend it to anyone who has an undergraduate knowledge of physics and mathematics and an interest in foundational questions. Whether it actually lives up to its title is for each reader to judge. This book deals with the fascinating topics of Bose–Einstein condensation (BEC) and superfluidity. The main emphasis is on providing the formalism to describe these phases of matter as observed in the laboratory. This is far from the idealised studies that originally predicted BEC and are essential to interpret the experimental observations. BEC was predicted in 1925 by Einstein, based on the ideas of Satyendra Nath Bose. It corresponds to a new phase of matter where bosons accumulate at the lowest energy level and develop coherent quantum properties at a macroscopic scale. These properties may correspond to phenomena that seem impossible from an everyday perspective. In particular, BEC lies behind the theory of superfluids, which are fluids that flow without dissipating energy and rotate without generating vorticity – if we except quantised vortices, which are a sort of topological defect. Experimentally, the first BEC from dilute gases was observed in the laboratory in 1995, recognised by the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physics. Since then, there has been an explosion of interest and new results in the field. It is thus timely that two of its leading experts have updated and extended their volume on BEC to summarise the theoretical aspects of this phase of matter. The authors also describe in detail how superfluid phenomena can occur for Fermi gases in the presence of interactions. The book is relatively heavy in formalism, which is justified by the wide range of phenomena covered in a relatively concise volume. It starts with some basics about correlation functions, condensation and statistical mechanics. Next, it delves into the simplest systems for which BEC can occur: weakly coupled dilute gases of bosonic particles. The authors describe different approaches to the BEC phase, including the works of Landau and Bogoliubov. They also introduce the Gross–Pitaevskii equation and show its importance in the description of superfluids. Superfluidity is explained in great detail, in particular the occurrence of quantised vortices. The second part describes how to adapt the theoretical formalism introduced in the first part to realistic traps where BEC is observed. This is very important to connect theoretical descriptions to laboratory research, for instance to predict in which experimental configurations a BEC will appear and how to characterise it. Part three deals with BEC in fermionic systems, which is possible if the fermions interact and pair-up into bosonic structures. These fermionic phases exhibit superfluid properties and have been created in the laboratory, and the authors consider fermionic condensates in realistic traps. The final part is devoted to new phenomena appearing in mixed bosonic–fermionic systems. The book is a good resource for the theoretical description of BEC beyond the idealised configurations that are described in many texts. The concise style and large amount of notation requires constant effort from the reader, but seems inevitable to explain many of the surprising phenomena appearing in BECs. The book, perhaps combined with others, will provide the reader with a clear overview of the topic and latest theoretical developments in the field. The text is enhanced by the many figures and plots presenting experimental data. This book contains the proceedings of the Thorium Energy Conference (ThEC13), held in October 2013 at CERN, which brought together some of the world’s leading experts on thorium technologies. According to them, nuclear energy based on a thorium fuel cycle is safer and cleaner than the one generated from uranium. In addition, long-lived waste from existing power plants could be retrieved and integrated into the thorium fuel cycle to be transformed into a stable material while generating electricity. The technology required to implement this type of fuel cycle is already being developed, nevertheless much effort and time is still needed. The ThEC13 conference saw the participation of high-level speakers from 30 countries, such as the Nobel prize laureates Carlo Rubbia and Jack Steinberger, the then CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer, and Hans Blix, former director-general of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), to name a few. Collecting the contributions of the speakers, this book offers a detailed technical review of thorium-energy technologies from basic R&D to industrial developments, and is thus a tool for informed debates on the future of energy production and, in particular, on the advantages and disadvantages of different nuclear technologies. The aim of this book is to provide undergraduate students taking classes in the physical sciences with the fundamental-mathematics tools they need to proceed with their studies. In the first part the author introduces core mathematics, starting from basic concepts such as functions of one variable and complex numbers, and moving to more advanced topics including vector spaces, fields and operators, and functions of a complex variable. The second part shows some of the copious applications of these mathematics tools to physics. When introducing complex physics laws and theories, including Maxwell’s equations, special relativity and quantum theory, the author tries to present the material in an easily intelligible way. The author also emphasises the direct connection between the conceptual basis of these physics topics and the mathematical tools provided in the first part of the text. Two appendices of formulas conclude the book. A large number of problems are included but the solutions are only made available on a password-protected website for lecturers.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.mining-journal.com

Lithium hopeful Ardiden (AU:ADV) was one of five companies to gain 42.9% over seven days to top this week’s list of Australian and Hong Kong-listed market risers. Ardiden was up thanks to news earlier this week of thick, high-grade lithium hits at its Seymour Lake project in Ontario. Asian shares scaled two-year highs today while the dollar and US bond yields slipped after the US Federal Reserve signalled a cautious approach to future rate hikes and the reduction of its $4.5 trillion of bond holdings, Reuters reported. Chinese shares bounced back after a fall yesterday on Moody’s downgrade of the country’s credit rating. Among the other four up 42.9%, explorer GB Energy rose on news it would start drilling at its Mt Denison copper-gold-uranium project in South Australia. News mid-month that Japan’s Takahama nuclear power plant was due to restart in June was a likely boost to the sector, with uranium hopeful Bannerman Resources (AU:BMN) up 35.1% for the week despite no news since its quarterly report a month ago, when it said it was well-positioned “within an environment of improving uranium sector sentiment”. And Greenland Minerals and Energy (GGG) was up 30% for the week following a visit to its proposed Kvanefjeld uranium and rare earths project by International Atomic Energy Agency and government officials this month. Finally, explorer Impact Minerals (AU:IPT), which has announced priority drill targets at its gold-silver-zinc-lead-copper Commonwealth project in New South Wales, gained 33.3% for the week.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.engineeringnews.co.za

National Nuclear Regulator (NNR) CEO Dr Bismark Tyobeka has been elected to serve as president of the sixth review meeting of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. The joint convention was adopted on September 5, 1997, and entered into force on June 18, 2001, establishing an international peer review process among contracting parties and providing incentives for nations to take appropriate steps to bring their nuclear activities into compliance with general safety standards and practices. South Africa acceded to the joint convention on November 15, 2006. Tyobeka will work closely with the convention’s two VPs – Geoff Williams from the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency and Douglas Tonkay, from the US Department of Energy – to encourage constructive discussions on key issues faced by parties to the convention. He will also engage with regional networks, in particular those that form part of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Global Nuclear Safety and Security Network to assist member States, who are not already contracting parties to the joint convention to become contracting parties.


BEIJING (Reuters) - The nuclear energy industry needs an annual investment of $80 billion in order to meet climate change goals, the director of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said on Friday.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

The UK nuclear industry has issued its strongest warning yet to ministers on the problems it faces if the government is unable to strike new international atomic power deals during Brexit talks. Failure to put in place alternative arrangements to replace the existing European nuclear treaty, Euratom, which the UK is quitting as part of the article 50 process, would have a “dramatic impact” on Hinkley Point C and other new power stations around the country, the industry said. Ministers must avoid a “cliff edge” when the UK exits Euratom or face “major disruption to business across the whole nuclear fuel cycle”, the Nuclear Industry Association will warn the government on Wednesday. The stark briefing to officials, seen by the Guardian, comes just a day after MPs said the continued operations of the UK nuclear industry were at risk from exiting the Euratom treaty. A Lords committee on Tuesday also said the UK risked losing access to markets and skills when leaving Euratom. Tom Greatrex, the chief executive of the NIA, said: “We’ve had today two select committee reports that have both touched on this. The industry has been and is clear to government we are ready to do what we can – but it needs the government to get on with this and engage now, regardless of all the other issues they have to deal with.” Theresa May’s decision to call a general election had made matters worse, he added, because it had squeezed the time available to establish alternatives to the treaty. Euratom was first signed in 1957 by Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg and the Netherlands, and covers nuclear power station inspections, trade of materials and research. The UK’s departure will mean the government needs to agree a new inspections regime with the International Atomic Energy Agency to replace Euratom inspectors. “If the UK has not replaced the Euratom safeguards regime with its own system by the time it left Euratom, normal business could be disrupted right across the nuclear industry,” the NIA paper said. Falling back on World Trade Organisation standards would risk putting the UK in breach of its obligations in international nuclear law, the organisation added. Nuclear cooperation agreements (NCAs) would also need to be put in place with key nuclear countries outside the EU, including the US, Japan and Australia, because the UK’s agreements with those governments are currently based on its membership of Euratom. The report said: “Leaving the Euratom treaty without alternative arrangements in place would have a dramatic impact on the nuclear industry including the UK’s new build plans, existing operations and the waste and decommissioning sector which all depend, to some extent, on cooperation with nuclear states.” Greatrex said that matters were complicated by the fact that things had to be done in sequence, rather than in parallel. The new safeguards and inspection regime needed to be in place before the NCAs were struck, for example. Nuclear experts said that despite the dire warnings, the industry was not exaggerating the risks. Dame Sue Ion, honorary president of the Nuclear Skills Academy and former chair of the Nuclear Innovation Research Advisory Board, said: “It’s absolutely real [the impact if alternatives are not in place]. It literally does mean you cannot move material or IP [intellectual property] or services or components or medical isotopes.” She was echoed by Rupert Cowen, a senior nuclear energy lawyer at Prospect Law. “I don’t think they’re overstating the case,” he told the Guardian. Cowen was critical of officials in government who he called “ignorant” of the impact of leaving Euratom and who “think it’ll be alright on the night. It won’t.” The NIA urged the government to give “strong consideration” to remaining a member of Euratom if it had not thrashed out new deals and arrangements by the end of the two-year window triggered by article 50.


Receive press releases from The Knowledge Group: By Email Wojciech Z. Kornacki, Of Counsel, Watson & Associates LLC, to Speak at TKG’s The Iran Nuclear Deal Under Trump: What Oil Companies Should be Aware of Live Webcast New York, NY, May 02, 2017 --( For further details, please visit: https://www.theknowledgegroup.org/webcasts/legal/international-trade-law/the-iran-nuclear-deal-under-trump-what-oil-companies-should-be-aware-of-live-webcast About Wojciech Z. Kornacki Wojciech Kornacki is a Government Contract and Compliance Attorney (Of Counsel) of Watson and Associate’s Government Contracting Group assisting foreign and domestic corporations in the Washington D.C. Metro area. He practices Federal Government Procurement and Compliance law. He represents and counsels businesses in legal matters relating to the latest legislative updates and legal developments in the areas of federal compliance, bid protests, agency debarments, claims and appeals, trade agreements, and export controls, among other matters. Mr. Kornacki has written and lectured on legal topics relating to code of business ethics, and trade agreements act, compliance, among others. He is a member of the U.S. Court of Federal Claims Bar Association and the American Bar Association’s Government Procurement Committee. While on Active Duty, Mr. Kornacki served in the U.S. Army as a judge advocate where he defended Soldiers in court-martials, provided legal advice during military operations in Iraq, and drafted legal opinions on government contract and fiscal law matters. Mr. Kornacki was stationed in Germany, Iraq, and Virginia. He earned his Master of Studies from Oxford University, his Juris Doctorate from City University of New York School of Law at Queens College, and his Bachelor of Arts, Cum Laude, from Pace University. He is admitted to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces. His email address is kornackiw@theodorewatson.com and phone number 202.827.9750. About Watson & Associates LLC Watson & Associates LLC with its offices in Washington DC and Colorado focuses on representing domestic and international clients in virtually all aspects of federal government contract law and procurement matters. Our law firm’s attorneys frequently serve as outside counsel for various federal procurement and compliance matters, including investigations, litigation and appeals. Watson & Associates LLC was founded in 2003 by Theodore Watson who retired from the U.S. Air Force and desired to help companies in navigating through the complex regulatory framework of contracting with various federal agencies. Event Synopsis: President Donald Trump’s election has clouded the future of the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action between Iran and the P5+1 nations, which curtailed Iran’s ability to build nuclear weapons and in return eased certain economic sanctions imposed by the U.S., the EU and the UN Security Council. Trump vowed during his campaign to make it a priority of his presidency to dismantle the accord, calling it “one of the worst deals ever made.” Recent remarks by members of his administration suggest Trump is seeking renegotiation of key terms of the accord and exploring how to tighten enforcement, such as by insisting that the International Atomic Energy Agency demand access to Iran military sites. In this live Webcast, a panel of thought leaders brought together by The Knowledge Group will analyze the main features of the JCPOA, its most controversial provisions and the likelihood of the accord being altered or abrogated as a result of changing American policy towards the region. The potential impact on the oil and gas industry, due to Iran’s position in the oil production market, will also be analyzed. Key topics include: - Overview of Iran Nuclear Deal - Role of International Atomic Energy Agency - Current State of Compliance - Flash Points for U.S. Policy Shifts - Continuing Sanctions Against Iranian Interests - Effect of Iranian Withdrawal From Accord About The Knowledge Group, LLC/The Knowledge Congress Live Webcast Series The Knowledge Congress was established with the mission to produce unbiased, objective, and educational live webinars that examine industry trends and regulatory changes from a variety of different perspectives. The goal is to deliver a unique multilevel analysis of an important issue affecting business in a highly focused format. To contact or register to an event, please visit: http://theknowledgegroup.org/ New York, NY, May 02, 2017 --( PR.com )-- The Knowledge Group/The Knowledge Congress Live Webcast Series, the leading producer of regulatory focused webcasts, has announced today that Wojciech Z. Kornacki, Of Counsel, Watson & Associates LLC will speak at The Knowledge Group’s webcast entitled: “The Iran Nuclear Deal Under Trump: What Oil Companies Should Be Aware Of.” This event is scheduled for May 16, 2017 from 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM (ET).For further details, please visit:https://www.theknowledgegroup.org/webcasts/legal/international-trade-law/the-iran-nuclear-deal-under-trump-what-oil-companies-should-be-aware-of-live-webcastAbout Wojciech Z. KornackiWojciech Kornacki is a Government Contract and Compliance Attorney (Of Counsel) of Watson and Associate’s Government Contracting Group assisting foreign and domestic corporations in the Washington D.C. Metro area. He practices Federal Government Procurement and Compliance law. He represents and counsels businesses in legal matters relating to the latest legislative updates and legal developments in the areas of federal compliance, bid protests, agency debarments, claims and appeals, trade agreements, and export controls, among other matters. Mr. Kornacki has written and lectured on legal topics relating to code of business ethics, and trade agreements act, compliance, among others. He is a member of the U.S. Court of Federal Claims Bar Association and the American Bar Association’s Government Procurement Committee.While on Active Duty, Mr. Kornacki served in the U.S. Army as a judge advocate where he defended Soldiers in court-martials, provided legal advice during military operations in Iraq, and drafted legal opinions on government contract and fiscal law matters. Mr. Kornacki was stationed in Germany, Iraq, and Virginia.He earned his Master of Studies from Oxford University, his Juris Doctorate from City University of New York School of Law at Queens College, and his Bachelor of Arts, Cum Laude, from Pace University. He is admitted to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces. His email address is kornackiw@theodorewatson.com and phone number 202.827.9750.About Watson & Associates LLCWatson & Associates LLC with its offices in Washington DC and Colorado focuses on representing domestic and international clients in virtually all aspects of federal government contract law and procurement matters. Our law firm’s attorneys frequently serve as outside counsel for various federal procurement and compliance matters, including investigations, litigation and appeals. Watson & Associates LLC was founded in 2003 by Theodore Watson who retired from the U.S. Air Force and desired to help companies in navigating through the complex regulatory framework of contracting with various federal agencies.Event Synopsis:President Donald Trump’s election has clouded the future of the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action between Iran and the P5+1 nations, which curtailed Iran’s ability to build nuclear weapons and in return eased certain economic sanctions imposed by the U.S., the EU and the UN Security Council. Trump vowed during his campaign to make it a priority of his presidency to dismantle the accord, calling it “one of the worst deals ever made.” Recent remarks by members of his administration suggest Trump is seeking renegotiation of key terms of the accord and exploring how to tighten enforcement, such as by insisting that the International Atomic Energy Agency demand access to Iran military sites.In this live Webcast, a panel of thought leaders brought together by The Knowledge Group will analyze the main features of the JCPOA, its most controversial provisions and the likelihood of the accord being altered or abrogated as a result of changing American policy towards the region. The potential impact on the oil and gas industry, due to Iran’s position in the oil production market, will also be analyzed.Key topics include:- Overview of Iran Nuclear Deal- Role of International Atomic Energy Agency- Current State of Compliance- Flash Points for U.S. Policy Shifts- Continuing Sanctions Against Iranian Interests- Effect of Iranian Withdrawal From AccordAbout The Knowledge Group, LLC/The Knowledge Congress Live Webcast SeriesThe Knowledge Congress was established with the mission to produce unbiased, objective, and educational live webinars that examine industry trends and regulatory changes from a variety of different perspectives. The goal is to deliver a unique multilevel analysis of an important issue affecting business in a highly focused format. To contact or register to an event, please visit: http://theknowledgegroup.org/ Click here to view the company profile of The Knowledge Group Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from The Knowledge Group


Rehani M.M.,International Atomic Energy Agency
American Journal of Roentgenology | Year: 2013

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to presage the upcoming challenges in the area of radiation protection of patients in imaging for different stakeholders, such as dosimetrists, radiation biologists, patients, referring physicians, radiologists, radiographers, medical physicists, and manufacturers. CONCLUSION. Most of the challenges facing different stakeholders are actually based on the contribution required from industry; thus, manufacturers play the greatest role in making patients safer in this century. © American Roentgen Ray Society.

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