International Agency for Cancer Research

Sainte-Foy-lès-Lyon, France

International Agency for Cancer Research

Sainte-Foy-lès-Lyon, France
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Familiar I.,Michigan State University | Ortiz-Panozo E.,Center for Population Health Research | Hall B.,University of Macau | Vieitez I.,Center for Population Health Research | And 4 more authors.
International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research | Year: 2015

Structure of the Spanish version of the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) has been inconclusive. We report the factor structure of the PHQ-9 in 55,555 women from the Mexican Teachers' Cohort (MTC). Factor structure of the PHQ-9 was assessed by exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses in two sub-samples (n=27,778 and 27,777 respectively). A one-factor model of the PHQ-9 was the solution with the best fit to the data, exhibiting strong factor loadings (0.71 to 0.90) and high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.89). A prevalence rate of moderate to high severity of depressive symptoms of 12.6% was identified. Results suggest that a global score is an appropriate measure of depressive symptoms and commend the use of the Spanish PHQ-9 as a measure of depression for research and clinical purposes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Berwick M.,University of New Mexico | Macarthur J.,University of New Mexico | Orlow I.,Sloan Kettering Cancer Center | Kanetsky P.,University of Pennsylvania | And 30 more authors.
Pigment Cell and Melanoma Research | Year: 2014

A rare germline variant in the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) gene, E318K, has been reported as associated with melanoma. We confirmed its independent association with melanoma [odds ratio (OR) 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1, 2.7, P = 0.03]; adjusted for age, sex, center, age × sex interaction, pigmentation characteristics, family history of melanoma, and nevus density). In stratified analyses, carriage of MITF E318K was associated with melanoma more strongly in people with dark hair than fair hair (P for interaction, 0.03) and in those with no moles than some or many moles (P for interaction, <0.01). There was no evidence of interaction between MC1R 'red hair variants' and MITF E318K. Moreover, risk of melanoma among carriers with 'low risk' phenotypes was as great or greater than among those with 'at risk' phenotypes with few exceptions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Mahabir S.,U.S. National Cancer Institute | Aagaard K.,Baylor College of Medicine | Anderson L.M.,NCI Inc | Herceg Z.,International Agency for Cancer Research | And 8 more authors.
Cancer Causes and Control | Year: 2012

It is becoming increasingly evident that early-life events and exposures have important consequences for cancer development later in life. However, epidemiological studies of early-life factors and cancer development later in life have had significant methodological challenges such as the long latency period, the distinctiveness of each cancer, and large number of subjects that must be studied, all likely to increase costs. These traditional hurdles might be mitigated by leveraging several existing large-scale prospective studies in the United States (US) and globally, as well as birth databases and birth cohorts, in order to launch both association and mechanistic studies of early-life exposures and cancer development later in life. Dedicated research funding will be needed to advance this paradigm shift in cancer research, and it seems justified by its potential to produce transformative understanding of how cancer develops over the life-course. This in turn has the potential to transform cancer prevention strategies through interventions in early-life rather than later in life, as is the current practice, where it is perhaps less effective. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Taylor N.J.,H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute | Busam K.J.,Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center | From L.,Womens College Hospital | Groben P.A.,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | And 13 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Variation in the melanocortin-1receptor (MC1R) gene is associated with pigmentary phenotypes and risk of malignant melanoma. Few studies have reported on MC1R variation with respect to tumor characteristics, especially clinically important prognostic features. We examined associations between MC1R variants and histopathological melanoma characteristics. Study participants were enrolled from nine geographic regions in Australia, Canada, Italy and the United States and were genotyped for MC1R variants classified as high-risk [R] (D84E, R142H, R151C, R160W, and D294H, all nonsense and insertion/deletion) or low-risk [r] (all other nonsynonymous) variants. Tissue was available for 2,160 white participants of the Genes, Environment and Melanoma (GEM) Study with a first incident primary melanoma diagnosis, and underwent centralized pathologic review. No statistically significant associations were observed between MC1R variants and AJCC established prognostic tumor characteristics: Breslow thickness, presence of mitoses or presence of ulceration. However, MC1R was significantly associated with anatomic site of melanoma (p = 0.002) and a positive association was observed between carriage of more than one [R] variant and melanomas arising on the arms (OR = 2.39; 95% CI: 1.40, 4.09). We also observed statistically significant differences between sun-sensitive and sun-resistant individuals with respect to associations between MC1R genotype and AJCC prognostic tumor characteristics. Our results suggest inherited variation in MC1R may play an influential role in anatomic site presentation of melanomas and may differ with respect to skin pigmentation phenotype. © 2015 Taylor et al.


Taylor N.J.,Moffitt Cancer Center | Reiner A.S.,Sloan Kettering Cancer Center | Begg C.B.,Sloan Kettering Cancer Center | Cust A.E.,University of Sydney | And 14 more authors.
International Journal of Cancer | Year: 2015

Melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) is a marker of melanoma risk in populations of European ancestry. However, MC1R effects on survival are much less studied. We investigated associations between variation at MC1R and survival in an international, population-based series of single primary melanoma patients enrolled into the Genes, Environment, and Melanoma study. MC1R genotype data was available for 2,200 participants with a first incident primary melanoma diagnosis. We estimated the association of MC1R genotypes with melanoma-specific survival (i.e., death caused by melanoma) and overall survival using COX proportional hazards modeling, adjusting for established prognostic factors for melanoma. We also conducted stratified analyses by Breslow thickness, tumor site, phenotypic index, and age. In addition, we evaluated haplotypes involving polymorphisms near the Agouti signaling protein gene (ASIP) locus for their impacts on survival. Melanoma-specific survival was inversely associated with carriage of MC1R variants in the absence of consensus alleles compared to carriage of at least one consensus allele (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.60; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.40, 0.90). MC1R results for overall survival were consistent with no association. We did not observe any statistical evidence of heterogeneity of effect estimates in stratified analyses. We observed increased hazard of melanoma-specific death among carriers of the risk haplotype TG near the ASIP locus (HR = 1.37; 95% CI: 0.91, 2.04) when compared to carriers of the most common GG haplotype. Similar results were noted for overall survival. Upon examining the ASIP TG/TG diplotype, we observed considerably increased hazard of melanoma-specific death (HR = 5.11; 95% CI: 1.88, 13.88) compared to carriers of the most common GG/GG diplotype. Our data suggest improved melanoma-specific survival among carriers of two inherited MC1R variants. What's new? MC1R has important pigmentary biological functions, and inherited variations in the gene are well-known markers of melanoma risk. But whether those variants are also associated with disease survival is unknown. Here, germline variation at MC1R was associated with improved melanoma-specific survival in carriers who lacked a consensus MC1R allele. By contrast, the ASIP TG/TG diplotype, which also is known to be associated with melanoma risk, was linked to a 5-fold increase in hazard of death from melanoma. The findings indicate a complex but influential role for pigmentary genetic loci in melanoma outcomes. © 2014 UICC.


Gallus S.,Instituto Of Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri | Turati F.,Instituto Of Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri | Turati F.,University of Milan | Tavani A.,Instituto Of Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri | And 5 more authors.
Cancer Causes and Control | Year: 2011

Soft drinks usually contain sugar and caffeine that might influence pancreatic carcinogenesis. We considered the association between carbonated drink consumption and pancreatic cancer risk in an Italian case-control study conducted in 1991-2008 on 326 pancreatic cancer cases and 652 matched controls. We also combined the results from all the studies on soft drinks or sweetened beverages and pancreatic cancer published before June 2010, using a meta-analytic approach. In the case-control study, compared with non-drinkers, the multivariate odds ratio was 1.02 (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.72-1.44) for carbonated drink consumers and 0.89 (95% CI 0.53-1.50) for regular consumers (at least one drink/day). Besides our study, from the literature search, we identified 4 other case-control (1,919 cases) and 6 cohort studies (2,367 cases). The pooled relative risks (RR) for soft drink consumers vs. non-consumers were 0.97 (95% CI 0.81-1.16) for case-control, 1.05 (95% CI 0.94-1.17) for cohort, and 1.02 (95% CI 0.93-1.12) for all studies. The pooled RRs for heavy drinkers were 1.08 (95% CI 0.73-1.60) for case-control, 1.21 (95% CI 0.90-1.63) for cohort, and 1.16 (95% CI 0.93-1.45) for all studies. In conclusion, soft drink consumption is not materially related to pancreatic cancer risk. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


PubMed | Philadelphia University, University of California at Irvine, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Piedmont Tumor Registry and 8 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Variation in the melanocortin-1receptor (MC1R) gene is associated with pigmentary phenotypes and risk of malignant melanoma. Few studies have reported on MC1R variation with respect to tumor characteristics, especially clinically important prognostic features. We examined associations between MC1R variants and histopathological melanoma characteristics. Study participants were enrolled from nine geographic regions in Australia, Canada, Italy and the United States and were genotyped for MC1R variants classified as high-risk [R] (D84E, R142H, R151C, R160W, and D294H, all nonsense and insertion/deletion) or low-risk [r] (all other nonsynonymous) variants. Tissue was available for 2,160 white participants of the Genes, Environment and Melanoma (GEM) Study with a first incident primary melanoma diagnosis, and underwent centralized pathologic review. No statistically significant associations were observed between MC1R variants and AJCC established prognostic tumor characteristics: Breslow thickness, presence of mitoses or presence of ulceration. However, MC1R was significantly associated with anatomic site of melanoma (p = 0.002) and a positive association was observed between carriage of more than one [R] variant and melanomas arising on the arms (OR = 2.39; 95% CI: 1.40, 4.09). We also observed statistically significant differences between sun-sensitive and sun-resistant individuals with respect to associations between MC1R genotype and AJCC prognostic tumor characteristics. Our results suggest inherited variation in MC1R may play an influential role in anatomic site presentation of melanomas and may differ with respect to skin pigmentation phenotype.

Loading International Agency for Cancer Research collaborators
Loading International Agency for Cancer Research collaborators