International Adviser Drylands Agriculture

Rishon Letzion, Israel

International Adviser Drylands Agriculture

Rishon Letzion, Israel
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Ibrahim A.,International Crops Research Institute for the Semi Arid Tropics ICRISAT | Pasternak D.,International Adviser Drylands Agriculture | Guimbo I.D.,University of Tahoua | Saidou A.S.,International Crops Research Institute for the Semi Arid Tropics ICRISAT | Amadou M.,International Crops Research Institute for the Semi Arid Tropics ICRISAT
Journal of Horticultural Research | Year: 2015

A long-term study was conducted to explore the possibility of using traditional rain-fed systems for growing domesticated Ziziphus mauritiana (so-called Pomme du Sahel) in the Sahel. Five varieties, Gola, Ben Gurion, Seb, Umran and Kaithli, were grafted on six rootstocks of Z. mauritiana from various agroecological zones of Niger. Trees were planted inside microcatchments at 8 × 8 m spacing. Over a period of six years, the variety Umran gave the highest fruit yield (3600 kg·ha-1) and the lowest fruit yield was documented for variety Seb (1970 kg·ha-1). Individual fruit weight ranged from 25.8 g for 'Umran' to 9.5 g for 'Seb'. The rootstocks had no effect on average fruits yields and fruit size. There was a significant linear correlation between fruit yield and annual rainfall. In a rainy year (680 mm), the average yield of the five varieties was 7580 kg·ha-1. The results of the current study indicate that dry land plantations of Pomme du Sahel can guarantee food security during dry years in the Sahel. However, further studies are required to evaluate the economic feasibility of this system. © 2015 Ali Ibrahim et al.


Ibrahim A.,International Crops Research Institute for the Semi Arid Tropics ICRISAT | Pasternak D.,International Adviser Drylands Agriculture | Fatondji D.,International Crops Research Institute for the Semi Arid Tropics ICRISAT
Journal of Agricultural Science | Year: 2015

A study was carried out in the rainy seasons of 2008 and 2009 in Niger to investigate the effects of fertilizer micro-dosing on root development, yield and soil nutrient exploitation of pearl millet. Different rates of diammonium phosphate (DAP) were applied to the soil at different depths and it was found that although micro-dosing with DAP increased grain yield over the unfertilized control to a similar level as broadcast DAP, doubling the micro-dosage did not increase it further. Increasing the depth of fertilizer application from 5 to 10 cm resulted in significant increases in root length density, and deep application of fertilizer resulted in higher yields, although the increases were generally not significant. It was postulated that the positive effect of micro-dosing resulted from better exploitation of soil nutrients because of the higher root volume. Levels of nutrients exported from the soil were at least as high in plants receiving micro-dosing as the unfertilized control, and plants receiving micro-dosing exported 5-10 times more phosphorus from the soil than the amount added through fertilization. © Cambridge University Press 2014.

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