Intermountain Primary Childrens Medical Center

Salt Lake City, UT, United States

Intermountain Primary Childrens Medical Center

Salt Lake City, UT, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Stockmann C.,University of Utah | Sherwin C.M.T.,University of Utah | Zobell J.T.,Intermountain Primary Childrens Medical Center | Zobell J.T.,Intermountain Cystic Fibrosis Pediatric Center | And 5 more authors.
Pediatric Pulmonology | Year: 2013

This review is the third installment in a comprehensive State of the Art series and aims to evaluate the use of fluoroquinolones in the management of P. aeruginosa infection in both children and adults with cystic fibrosis (CF). Oral and intravenous ciprofloxacin have been shown to be well-tolerated in the treatment of acute pulmonary exacerbations (APE) secondary to P. aeruginosa. Older literature supports an oral dosing regimen of 40 mg/kg/day divided every 12 hr, up to 2 g/day, and intravenous (IV) ciprofloxacin 30 mg/kg/day divided every 8 hr, maximum 1.2 g/day in children, and 750 mg administered orally twice a day or 400 mg IV every 8 hr in adults. However, a recent pharmacodynamic (PD) modeling study shows that the literature, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved, and Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) guideline dosing regimens may be suboptimal for the treatment of P. aeruginosa in APE. Further study is warranted to determine if higher doses of ciprofloxacin are needed. Limited pharmacokinetic (PK), PK/PD, and efficacy studies involving levofloxacin exist in adult patients with CF. No pediatric data exists for levofloxacin in CF patients. Further study is needed to determine the tolerability and efficacy of levofloxacin in APE. At this time, the routine use of levofloxacin in the treatment of APE in pediatric and adult patients cannot be recommended. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2013; 48:211-220. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Zobell J.T.,Intermountain Primary Childrens Medical Center | Zobell J.T.,Intermountain Cystic Fibrosis Pediatric Center | Young D.C.,University of Utah | Young D.C.,Intermountain Cystic Fibrosis Adult Center | And 6 more authors.
Pediatric Pulmonology | Year: 2012

Acute pulmonary exacerbations (APE) in cystic fibrosis (CF) are associated with loss of lung function that may require aggressive management with intravenous antibiotics. The aim of this review is to provide an evidence-based summary of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD), tolerability, and efficacy studies utilizing aztreonam and anti-pseudomonal carbapenems (i.e., doripenem, imipenem-cilastatin, and meropenem) in the treatment of an APE, and to identify areas where further study is warranted. The current dosing recommendations in the United States and Europe for aztreonam are lower than the literature supported dosing range of 200-300 mg/kg/day divided every 6 hr, maximum 8-12 g/day. In vitro, PK/PD, and tolerability studies show the potential of doripenem 90 mg/kg/day divided every 8 hr, infused over 4 hr, maximum 6 g/day in the treatment of APE. Imipenem-cilastatin 100 mg/kg/day divided every 6 hr, maximum 4 g/day and meropenem 120 mg/kg/day divided every 8 hr, maximum 6 g/day have been shown to be tolerable and effective in the treatment of APE. With availability issues of new anti-pseudomonal agents and a large percentage of CF patients will not regain their lung function following an APE, we suggest the need to determine optimization of aztreonam and meropenem dosing in CF, as well as to determine the clinical efficacy of doripenem in the treatment of APE. The usefulness of imipenem-cilastatin may be limited due to the rapid development of resistance. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Young D.C.,University of Utah | Young D.C.,Intermountain Cystic Fibrosis Adult Center | Zobell J.T.,Intermountain Primary Childrens Medical Center | Zobell J.T.,Intermountain Cystic Fibrosis Pediatric Center | And 5 more authors.
Pediatric Pulmonology | Year: 2013

Intravenous (IV) anti-pseudomonal aminoglycosides (i.e., amikacin and tobramycin) have been shown to be tolerable and effective in the treatment of acute pulmonary exacerbations (APEs) in both pediatric and adult patients with cystic fibrosis. The aim of this review is to provide an evidence-based summary of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic, tolerability, and efficacy studies utilizing IV amikacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin in the treatment of APE and to highlight areas where further investigation is needed. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Pulmonary Guidelines recommend that once-daily administration of aminoglycosides is preferred over three times per day in the treatment of an APE. The literature supports dosing ranges for amikacin and tobramycin of 30-35 and 7-15 mg/kg/day, respectively, given once daily, with subsequent doses determined by therapeutic drug concentration monitoring. The literature does not support the routine use of gentamicin in the treatment of APE due to a lack of studies showing efficacy and evidence indicating an increased risk of nephrotoxicity. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal dosing strategy of amikacin in the treatment of an APE, and to further identify risk factors and determinants that influence the development of P. aeruginosa resistance with once-daily administration of tobramycin. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2013; 48:1047-1061. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Keeshin B.R.,Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center | Strawn J.R.,University of Cincinnati | Luebbe A.M.,University of Miami | Saldana S.N.,Intermountain Primary Childrens Medical Center | And 3 more authors.
Child Abuse and Neglect | Year: 2014

Many children and adolescents who require psychiatric hospitalization have been physically or sexually abused, yet the association between reported histories of abuse and the complexity and severity of mental illness among psychiatrically hospitalized youth is poorly described with regard to current inpatient psychiatric practice. We sought to determine the association between histories of abuse and psychiatric complexity and severity in psychiatrically hospitalized youth including comorbidity patterns, psychotropic medication use, reason for admission and length of hospitalization. A systematic chart review was performed on 1433 consecutive psychiatric hospitalizations of children and adolescents that occurred over a 10-month period. Children with a history of abuse were more likely to be diagnosed with multiple DSM-IV-TR disorders than non-traumatized children. A history of sexual abuse was associated with more medication use than in their non-traumatized peers and a higher likelihood of treatment with antipsychotic medications, both at admission and discharge. Physical and sexual abuse were independently associated with increased length of stays, with exposure to both physical and sexual abuse associated with a 2-day increase in duration of hospitalization compared to non-traumatized patients. The findings from this study draw attention to the adverse impact of abuse on psychiatric morbidity and complexity and suggest the need for trauma-informed treatment in psychiatric hospital settings. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Zobell J.T.,Intermountain Primary Childrens Medical Center | Zobell J.T.,Intermountain Cystic Fibrosis Pediatric Center | Young D.C.,University of Utah | Young D.C.,Intermountain Cystic Fibrosis Adult Center | And 5 more authors.
Pediatric Pulmonology | Year: 2013

Acute pulmonary exacerbations (APE) are well-described complications of cystic fibrosis (CF) and are associated with progressive morbidity and mortality. Despite aggressive management with two or more intravenous anti-pseudomonal agents, approximately 25% of exacerbations will result in a loss of lung function. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the classes of intravenous anti-pseudomonal antibiotics, the findings of anti-pseudomonal antibiotic utilization surveys, the current antibiotic dosing recommendations from the U.S. and Europe, and the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) differences between CF and non-CF individuals. Anti-pseudomonal antibiotic classes include beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and colistimethate sodium. Recent surveys of antibiotic utilization in CF Foundation-accredited care centers have shown that a large number of centers are not following recommended dosing strategies despite published recommendations in the U.S. and Europe. The recommended doses for anti-pseudomonal antibiotics may be higher than FDA-approved doses due to PK and PD differences. As a large portion of CF patients will not regain their lung function following an APE, it seems possible that currently available anti-pseudomonal agents are being used sub-optimally. As new anti-pseudomonal agents are not currently available, we suggest the need to optimize antibiotic dosing and dosing regimens used to treat pulmonary exacerbations in an effort to improve outcomes for CF patients infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2013; 48:525-537. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Zobell J.T.,Intermountain Primary Childrens Medical Center | Zobell J.T.,Intermountain Cystic Fibrosis Pediatric Center | Kemper A.L.,Intermountain Primary Childrens Medical Center | Young D.C.,University of Utah | Young D.C.,Intermountain Cystic Fibrosis Adult Center
Pediatric Pulmonology | Year: 2014

Ceftazidime is the only anti-pseduomonal beta-lactam that has been reported to be administered by extended infusion in pediatric cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. A small pediatric pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic study has been published regarding the use of intermittent extended infusion doripenem in the treatment of an acute pulmonary exacerbation (APE) in pediatric CF patients; however, clinical use of intermittent extended infusion doripenem in pediatric CF patients has not been previously reported. We present three cases administering intermittent extended infusion doripenem in pediatric CF patients for the treatment of an APE in the case of replacing meropenem due to shortage. The delivery of beta-lactam antibiotics via intermittent extended infusion should be considered in order to optimize the pharmacodynamics of beta-lactams in the treatment of an APE. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Zobell J.T.,Intermountain Primary Childrens Medical Center | Zobell J.T.,Intermountain Cystic Fibrosis Pediatric Center | Ferdinand C.,Intermountain Primary Childrens Medical Center | Young D.C.,University of Utah | Young D.C.,Intermountain Cystic Fibrosis Adult Center
Pediatric Pulmonology | Year: 2014

Aztreonam, cefepime, and ceftazidime are anti-pseudomonal beta-lactam antibiotics which have been previously reported to be administered by continuous infusion (CI) in pediatric CF patients. We present two cases administering intravenous (IV) meropenem and ticarcillin-clavulanate by CI in pediatric CF patients. The delivery of beta-lactam antibiotics via CI should be considered in order to optimize the pharmacodynamics (PD) of beta-lactams in the treatment of acute pulmonary exacerbations (APE). © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Young D.C.,University of Utah | Young D.C.,Intermountain Cystic Fibrosis Adult Center | Zobell J.T.,Intermountain Primary Childrens Medical Center | Zobell J.T.,Intermountain Cystic Fibrosis Pediatric Center | And 6 more authors.
Pediatric Pulmonology | Year: 2013

Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) often experience acute pulmonary exacerbations (APE) and may be treated with a wide variety of intravenous antibiotics. The aim of this review is to provide an evidence-based summary of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD), tolerability, and efficacy studies utilizing the intravenous (IV) polymixin antibiotic colistimethate sodium (CMS) in the treatment of APE and to identify areas where further study is warranted. Currently, there is not an international standard on the labeling of CMS products. As a result, this has lead to confusion in the interpretation of the literature with respect to efficacy, tolerance, and optimal dosing strategy. The dosing ranges of IV CMS from the literature are 5.3-12.9 mg/kg/day, maximum 480 mg per day for 60 kg patient (Colomycin® injection-European product) and 8-21.3 mg/kg/day, maximum 800 mg per day for 60 kg patient (Coly-Mycin M® parenteral-US product).The literature supports a CMS dose of 8 mg/kg/day divided every 8 hr (maximum 480 mg/day) for the treatment of APE secondary to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The maximum recommended CMS dose of 480 mg/day is less than is recommended by the FDA-approved and CFF dosing guidelines but in agreement with UK CF Trust Antibiotic Working Group recommendations. There is debate over the frequency of CMS administration (once daily vs. thrice-daily) and its impact on resistance and clinical efficacy. Further study is needed to determine the tolerability and efficacy of extended-interval dosing of CMS in the treatment of APE. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Stockmann C.,University of Utah | Spigarelli M.G.,University of Utah | Campbell S.C.,University of Utah | Constance J.E.,University of Utah | And 5 more authors.
Pediatric Drugs | Year: 2014

The management of neonatal sepsis is challenging owing to complex developmental and environmental factors that contribute to inter-individual variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many antimicrobial agents. In this review, we describe (i) the changing epidemiology of early- and late-onset neonatal sepsis; (ii) the pharmacologic considerations that influence the safety and efficacy of antibacterials, antifungals, and immunomodulatory adjuvants; and (iii) the recommended dosing regimens for pharmacologic agents commonly used in the treatment and prevention of neonatal sepsis. Neonatal sepsis is marked by highmorbidity andmortality, such that prompt initiation of antimicrobial therapy is essential following culture collection. Before culture results are available, combination therapy with ampicillin and an aminoglycoside is recommended. When meningitis is suspected, ampicillin and cefotaxime may be considered. Following identification of the causative organism and in vitro susceptibility testing, antimicrobial therapy may be narrowed to provide targeted coverage. Therapeutic drug monitoring should be considered for neonates receiving vancomycin or aminoglycoside therapies. For neonates with invasive fungal infections, the development of new antifungal agents has significantly improved therapeutic outcomes in recent years. Liposomal amphotericin B has been found to be safe and efficacious in patients with renal impairment or toxicity caused by conventional amphotericin B. Antifungal prophylaxis with fluconazole has also been reported to dramatically reduce rates of neonatal invasive fungal infections and to improve long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes among treated children. Additionally, several large multicenter studies are currently investigating the safety and efficacy of oral lactoferrin as an immunoprophylactic agent for the prevention of neonatal sepsis. © Springer International Publishing 2013.


Zobell J.T.,Intermountain Primary Childrens Medical Center | Zobell J.T.,Intermountain Cystic Fibrosis Pediatric Center | Waters C.D.,Intermountain y Dee Hospital Center | Young D.C.,University of Utah | And 5 more authors.
Pediatric Pulmonology | Year: 2013

Acute pulmonary exacerbations (APE) are well-described complications of cystic fibrosis (CF) and are associated with progressive morbidity and mortality. Despite aggressive management with two or more intravenous anti-pseudomonal agents, approximately 25% of exacerbations will result in a loss of lung function. The aim of this review is to provide an evidence-based summary of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD), tolerability, and efficacy studies utilizing anti-pseudomonal cephalosporins (i.e., ceftazidime and cefepime) and penicillins (i.e., piperacillin-tazobactam and ticarcillin-clavulanate) in the treatment of APE and to identify areas where further study is warranted. The ceftazidime and cefepime dosing ranges from the literature are 200-400 mg/kg/day divided every 6-8 hr, maximum 8-12 g/day, and 150-200 mg/kg/day divided every 6-8 hr, up to 6-8 g/day, respectively. The literature supported dosing ranges for piperacillin and ticarcillin are 350-600 mg/kg/day divided every 4 hr, maximum 18-24 g/day of piperacillin component, and 400-750 mg/kg/day divided every 6 hr, up to 24-30 g/day of ticarcillin component, respectively. As a large portion of CF patients will not regain their lung function following an APE, we suggest the need to optimize antibiotic dosing and dosing regimens used to treat an APE in efforts to improve outcomes for CF patients infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Future studies are needed to determine the clinical efficacy of higher than FDA-approved doses of ceftazidime, cefepime, and ticarcillin-clavulanate in APE. The usefulness of high dose piperacillin (>600 mg/kg/day) may be limited due to treatment-related adverse effects. Further understanding of these adverse effects in CF patients is needed. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2013; 48:107-122. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Loading Intermountain Primary Childrens Medical Center collaborators
Loading Intermountain Primary Childrens Medical Center collaborators