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Sea Girt, NJ, United States

Fletcher R.,Intercat Inc.
Hydrocarbon Engineering | Year: 2011

Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) remains the most important component of advance high conversion refineries. The high product demand from the World War II era for FCC unit was for high octane aviation fuels from LPG olefins and light naphtha. The second major milestone the technology passed through was the explosive technology development resulting from the inclusion of zeolite in the FCC catalyst in 1962. One innovation pioneered by Intercat in the 1980s is the injection of highly concentrated, highly active catalysts into the circulating inventory of the FCC unit. The equilibrium nature of the circulating inventory enables the aggressive refiner the capability to optimize product selectivity according to ever changing market demands. Refiners have already begun to selectively inject bottoms cracking additives into their circulating inventory to rapidly profit from market shifts in gasoline to diesel demand. The use of highly precise and reliable catalyst injection technology together with the best available catalysts and additives ensures the greatest return possible on purchased crude stocks. Source


Evans M.,Intercat Inc.
Hydrocarbon Engineering | Year: 2010

Intercat began developing addition systems as a means of injecting catalytic additives into the FCCU. It was evident at that early date that traditional shot pot loading systems used by most refineries were extremely unreliable and required an excessive amount of maintenance to keep them operational. To circumvent the inherent problems associated with these shot pot systems, the company designed and developed a standalone, single vessel, single component additive addition system. Combined with the IMS computer controller, which features a feedback loop to ensure that the daily target additions are actually achieved, these addition systems soon became the standard for all additive and fresh catalyst addition systems alike. The second part of this article, which will appear in the June Issue, will continue the discussion by looking at multi component addition systems. Source


Evans M.,Intercat Inc.
Hydrocarbon Engineering | Year: 2010

Some of the recent developments in catalyst addition systems are discussed. Intercat first introduced the multi compartment (MC) addition system in 2003. The MC system is comprised of a single, skid mounted vessel that is divided internally into two or more separate compartments to allow for the controlled additions of multiple catalysts or additives into the FCCU. Currently two versions of the multi compartment addition system are available, The MC-2 loader, which has two 100 ft3 compartments, and the MC-3 loader, which has one 100 ft3 compartment and two 50 ft3 compartments. The Multi Source Catalyst Addition System (MSCAS) is based on a different platform from all previous Intercat addition systems. The MSCAS utilizes the same components as the larger addition systems but these are scaled down to achieve a smaller footprint and a lighter weight, more portable addition system. Both the MC and MSCAS additive systems have the flexibility to be used by the refiner to provide all catalytic component additions to the FCCU from a single addition system. Source


Fletcher R.,Intercat Inc.
Hydrocarbon Engineering | Year: 2010

Several innovative technologies have been employed to achieve maximum propylene yield in residue crackers. Intercat has recently introduced a new technology, Cat-Aid™, which enables the residue cracking operation to decrease the rare earth on zeolite of the catalyst in the circulating inventory without influencing conversion. The technology enables a refiner processing residue feedstocks to reduce rare earth concentrations on its fresh catalyst to desired levels. Reduced rare earth on the fresh catalyst increase propylene yield and increase the concentration of gasoline boiling range olefins. The gasoline olefins are the primary feedstock for ZSM5 additives. The technology has exhibited substantial improvements in activity and selectivity when deactivated in the presence of vanadium, as is the case with many vanadium traps. The primary effects of Cat-Aid when codeactivated with the fresh catalyst include increased activity due to zeolite protection and nitrogen absorption with an improvement in coke selectivity. Source


Fletcher R.,Intercat Inc.
Petroleum Technology Quarterly | Year: 2012

Rare earth is an essential element in today's FCC catalyst technologies, supplying increased activity, improved gasoline yields, and oxidation function in SOx additives. Cat-Aid and Super SOxGetter-II additive technology as catalyst additives for reducing rare earth cost are presented. Guidelines for the FCC operator are presented, enabling the most effective application of these two technologies. Best available technology related to the injection of these additives into the circulating inventory are described. Source

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