Cincinnati, OH, United States
Cincinnati, OH, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Elder N.C.,University of Cincinnati | Imhoff R.,University of Cincinnati | Chubinski J.,Interact for Health | Jacobson C.J.,University of Cincinnati | And 7 more authors.
Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine | Year: 2017

Background: A single self-rated health (SRH) question is associated with health outcomes, but agreement between SRH and physician-rated patient health (PRPH) has been poorly studied. We studied patient and physician reasoning for health ratings and the role played by patient lifestyle and objective health measures in the congruence between SRH and PRPH. Methods: Surveys of established family medicine patients and their physicians, and medical record review at 4 offices. Patients and physicians rated patient health on a 5-point scale and gave reasons for the rating and suggestions for improving health. Patients' and physicians' reasons for ratings and improvement suggestions were coded into taxonomies developed from the data. Bivariate relationships 5between the variables and the difference between SRH and PRPH were examined and all single predictors of the difference were entered into a multivariable regression model. Results: Surveys were completed by 506 patients and 33 physicians. SRH and PRPH ratings matched exactly for 38% of the patient-physician dyads. Variables associated with SRH being lower than PRPH were higher patient body mass index (P = .01), seeing the physician previously (P = .04), older age, (P < .001), and a higher comorbidity score (P = .001). Only 25.7% of the dyad reasons for health status rating and 24.1% of needed improvements matched, and these matches were unrelated to SRH/PRPH agreement. Physicians focused on disease in their reasoning for most patients, whereas patients with excellent or very good SRH focused on feeling well. Conclusions: Patients' and physicians' beliefs about patient health frequently lack agreement, confirming the need for shared decision making with patients.


Sprigg S.M.,Interact for Health | Wolgin F.,Growing Well | Chubinski J.,Interact for Health | Keller K.,Interact for Health
Health Affairs | Year: 2017

Health status and academic achievement have been found to be linked: When students have poor health status, they are at increased risk for poor academic outcomes. The school-based health center is a delivery model that supports improved access to health care, as well as healthy behaviors and outcomes, for students. Interact for Health is a private foundation that has provided funding to open school-based health centers in the Greater Cincinnati, Ohio, area since 1999. This article outlines grant-making strategies and effective policies that the foundation has identified as most conducive to creating sustainable school-based health centers. These include identification of the right partners, development of a business plan, and guidelines and policies that support long-term financial sustainability. © 2017 Project HOPE - The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.


Rulisa S.,University of Kigali | Rulisa S.,Interact for Health | Kateera F.,Medical Research Center | Bizimana J.P.,National University of Rwanda | And 9 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Background:Rwanda reported significant reductions in malaria burden following scale up of control intervention from 2005 to 2010. This study sought to; measure malaria prevalence, describe spatial malaria clustering and investigate for malaria risk factors among health-centre-presumed malaria cases and their household members in Eastern Rwanda.Methods:A two-stage health centre and household-based survey was conducted in Ruhuha sector, Eastern Rwanda from April to October 2011. At the health centre, data, including malaria diagnosis and individual level malaria risk factors, was collected. At households of these Index cases, a follow-up survey, including malaria screening for all household members and collecting household level malaria risk factor data, was conducted.Results:Malaria prevalence among health centre attendees was 22.8%. At the household level, 90 households (out of 520) had at least one malaria-infected member and the overall malaria prevalence for the 2634 household members screened was 5.1%. Among health centre attendees, the age group 5-15 years was significantly associated with an increased malaria risk and a reported ownership of ≥4 bednets was significantly associated with a reduced malaria risk. At the household level, age groups 5-15 and >15 years and being associated with a malaria positive index case were associated with an increased malaria risk, while an observed ownership of ≥4 bednets was associated with a malaria risk-protective effect. Significant spatial malaria clustering among household cases with clusters located close to water- based agro-ecosystems was observed.Conclusions:Malaria prevalence was significantly higher among health centre attendees and their household members in an area with significant household spatial malaria clustering. Circle surveillance involving passive case finding at health centres and proactive case detection in households can be a powerful tool for identifying household level malaria burden, risk factors and clustering. © 2013 Rulisa et al.


PubMed | University of Amsterdam, University of Liverpool, Interact for Health, University of Kigali and 5 more.
Type: | Journal: AIDS research and treatment | Year: 2015

Adult women (n = 113) and men (n = 100) initiating combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and women not yet eligible for cART (n = 199) in Kigali, Rwanda, were followed for 6-24 months between 2007 and 2010. In the cART groups, 21% of patients required a drug change due to side effects and 11% of patients had virological failure (defined as >1,000 HIV RNA copies/mL) after 12 months of cART. About a third of the pregnancies since HIV diagnosis were unintended. The proportion of women in the pre-cART group using modern contraception other than condoms (50%) was similar to women in the general population, but this proportion was only 25% in women initiating cART. Of the women who carried at least one pregnancy to term since having been diagnosed HIV-positive, a third reported to have participated in a prevention-of-mother-to-child-transmission (PMTCT, option A) intervention. Many patients were coinfected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (79-92%), human papillomavirus (38-53%), and bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs) with no differences between groups. We applaud the Rwandan government for having strengthened family planning and PMTCT services and for having introduced HPV vaccination in recent years, but additional work is needed to strengthen STI and HPV-related cancer screening and management in the HIV-positive population.


Walsh S.E.,Eastern Michigan University | Myers G.,Gail Myers Public Relations | Chubinski J.,Interact for Health | Zepeda S.G.,Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky
Health Affairs | Year: 2014

With finite resources to advance their missions, regional health foundations should critically evaluate the investments they make. This article reviews the costs and associated benefits of large-scale public opinion polling-specifically, the annual Kentucky Health Issues Poll, which is sponsored by the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky and Interact for Health, formerly the Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati. In addition to the information generated by the poll, the sponsoring foundations have benefited from increased name recognition and credibility with key stakeholders, including state policy makers and the media. Furthermore, jointly funding the poll has strengthened the relationship between the sponsoring foundations and has fostered other key collaborations. We find that the benefits from this poll more than justify its modest costs ($120,000 per year) and hope that this assessment may prove informative for other funders considering similar investments. © 2014 by Project HOPE.


Oakley M.A.,Brief Psychotherapy Center for Women | Addison S.C.,Brief Psychotherapy Center for Women | Piran N.,University of Toronto | Johnston G.J.,Interact for Health | And 4 more authors.
Psychotherapy Research | Year: 2013

The current study is the first to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief relational-cultural model of therapy in a community-based mental health center for women. The study was distinctive in its use of a hybrid model that employed elements of randomized control and naturalistic design. Results showed that the entire treatment group of 91 women improved significantly on all eight outcome measures. Therapeutic gains were maintained at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. The results lend support to the importance of including relational-cultural factors in the treatment of women. An adherence scale/manual was developed and implemented and will allow for replication. © 2013 Copyright Society for Psychotherapy Research.


Trademark
Interact for Health | Date: 2013-09-03

Printed Books, materials, pamphlets, newsletters, in public health and health policy. Consulting services, namely, providing consulting to individuals, government, businesses, and philanthropic and civic groups in the formation of advocacy and collaborative groups for the purpose of better coordinating and improving the health and social services these groups provide to their constituencies; public advocacy for health policies. Charitable services, namely providing grants and funding to health care institutions for health care activities and services in the nature of seminars, research services in the area of health; providing grants and funding for advocacy services and advocacy services by others in the area of health; providing grants and funding for research activities by others in the area of health; and providing grants and funding for conducting training seminars by others in the field of health, and research on health topics. Health research services; publication of books, pamphlets, and magazines featuring results of scholarly research; providing lectures, seminars, and training sessions in the field of health. Advocacy services, namely promoting public awareness of the need for health funding and health care for the underserved, and funding for various public and private programs that support systemic health reform; promoting public awareness of the need for greater access to health care, particularly for those people who have been historically underserved; and promoting public awareness in the fields of health funding, planning , health care needs of children, low wage workers, people with substance use disorders, and people with severe mental illness.


Trademark
Interact for Health | Date: 2013-09-03

Printed books, materials, pamphlets, newsletters, in public health and health policy. Consulting services, namely, providing consulting to individuals, government, businesses, and philanthropic and civic groups in the formation of advocacy and collaborative groups for the purpose of better coordinating and improving the health and social services these groups provide to their constituencies; public advocacy for health policies. Charitable services, namely, providing grants and funding to health care institutions for health care activities and services in the nature of seminars, research services in the area of health; providing grants and funding for advocacy services and advocacy services by others in the area of health; providing grants and funding for research activities by others in the area of health; and providing grants and funding for conducting training seminars by others in the field of health, and reseach on health topics. Health research services; publication of books, pamphlets, and magazines featuring results of scholarly research; providing lectures, seminars, and training sessions in the field of health. Advocacy services, namely promoting public awareness of the need for health funding and health care for the underserved, and funding for various public and private programs that support systemic health reform; promoting public awareness of the need for greater access to health care, particularly for those people who have been historically underserved; and promoting public awareness in the fields of health funding, planning, health care needs of children, low wage workers, people with substance use disorders, and people with severe mental illness.


Loading Interact for Health collaborators
Loading Interact for Health collaborators