Cardiology Intensive Care Unit

Paris, France

Cardiology Intensive Care Unit

Paris, France

Time filter

Source Type

Ennezat P.V.,Cardiology Intensive Care Unit | Vannesson C.,Cardiology Intensive Care Unit | Bouabdallaoui N.,Cardiology Intensive Care Unit | Marechaux S.,Cardiology Intensive Care Unit | And 2 more authors.
Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy | Year: 2011

Introduction: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition is clearly beneficial in patients with hypertension, heart failure, and post-myocardial infarction left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. However, whereas initial trials had reported a benefit of ACE inhibition in high-risk vascular patients, current trials of ACE inhibition have failed to demonstrate a clear benefit in vascular patients who are receiving risk-reduction interventions. The purpose of this review is to analyze the reasons behind the failure of the most recent trials of ACE inhibitors in vascular patients without overt LV dysfunction. The reader will gain an understanding of the time-dependent trend towards a reduction in the absolute benefit conferred by ACE inhibition in patients with vascular atherosclerosis as risk reduction interventions are increasingly implemented. Areas covered: Major trials with a follow-up period of at least 1 year assessing the use of ACE inhibitors in patients with a history of cardiac or vascular events were identified via a PubMed literature search. All-cause and cardiovascular mortality outcomes were reported for each trial, as well as the use of aspirin, lipid-lowering drugs and β-blockers, and the mean LV ejection fraction. Expert opinion: The findings of recent trials do not support the use of ACE inhibitors in vascular patients who, adherent with risk reduction therapy, do not have hypertension, diabetes, or LV dysfunction. © 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.


Ennezat P.V.,University of Lille Nord de France | Marechaux S.,University of Lille Nord de France | Bouabdallaoui N.,Cardiology Intensive Care Unit | Le Jemtel T.H.,Tulane University
Journal of Cardiac Failure | Year: 2013

Background Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is prevalent in decompensated heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). We investigated the effect of a return to a compensated state on pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) and functional mitral regurgitation (FMR). Methods and Results Two-dimensional Doppler echocardiography was prospectively performed before initiation of standard therapy and 48 hours later in 37 patients hospitalized for HFpEF-related dyspnea and in 26 patients hospitalized for non-HFpEF-related dyspnea. Left atrial volume index, and E/e′ ratio, and PASP were significantly greater and E-wave deceleration time significantly shorter in HFpEF than in non-HFpEF patients. Thirty-two of the 37 HFpEF had FMR on admission whereas none of the non-HFpEF patients had FMR. After 48 hours of therapy, the reduction in PASP was significantly greater in the 26 HFpEF patients who improved than in the 11 HFpEF patients who did not (-24 vs -9 mm Hg, respectively; P <0001), whereas PASP remained unchanged in non-HFpEF patients. The decrease in PASP correlated in HFpEF patients with reductions in blood pressure, heart rate, left ventricular end-diastolic volume, inferior vena cava diameter, E/A ratio, E/e′ ratio, mitral effective regurgitant orifice area (EROA), and E-wave deceleration time. The correlation between PASP and mitral EROA was the only one that remained significant by multivariate analysis. Conclusions Noninvasive monitoring of PASP and FMR during an episode of HFpEF decompensation reveals that the return to a compensated state is associated with a significant reduction in PASP and FMR. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Cardiology Intensive Care Unit
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Expert opinion on pharmacotherapy | Year: 2011

Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition is clearly beneficial in patients with hypertension, heart failure, and post-myocardial infarction left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. However, whereas initial trials had reported a benefit of ACE inhibition in high-risk vascular patients, current trials of ACE inhibition have failed to demonstrate a clear benefit in vascular patients who are receiving risk-reduction interventions. The purpose of this review is to analyze the reasons behind the failure of the most recent trials of ACE inhibitors in vascular patients without overt LV dysfunction. The reader will gain an understanding of the time-dependent trend towards a reduction in the absolute benefit conferred by ACE inhibition in patients with vascular atherosclerosis as risk reduction interventions are increasingly implemented.Major trials with a follow-up period of at least 1 year assessing the use of ACE inhibitors in patients with a history of cardiac or vascular events were identified via a PubMed literature search. All-cause and cardiovascular mortality outcomes were reported for each trial, as well as the use of aspirin, lipid-lowering drugs and -blockers, and the mean LV ejection fraction.The findings of recent trials do not support the use of ACE inhibitors in vascular patients who, adherent with risk reduction therapy, do not have hypertension, diabetes, or LV dysfunction.


Llitjos J.-F.,Cardiology intensive care unit | Puymirat E.,Cardiology intensive care unit | Vedrenne G.,Cardiology intensive care unit | Danchin N.,Cardiology intensive care unit
Annales de Cardiologie et d'Angeiologie | Year: 2014

A 44-year-old patient, with personal history of AIDS, was referred to our emergency unit with tachycardia and moderate signs of right-sided heart failure. The cardiac MRI study showed an impairment of the right ventricular free and inferior wall and the interventricular septum. The mass was characterized by notable heterogeneity with mixed areas of hypo- and hypersignal intensity in SSFP and T2-weighted images with fat saturation. There was global hyperenhancement of the mass after gadolinium contrast injection on T1-weighted images with and without fat saturation. The entire right coronary artery was included into the infiltrative mass. One day after the admission, the patient suddenly presented a paroxysmal third degree atrioventricular block, permanently corrected by an implanted cardiac pacemaker. Endomyocardial biopsy conformed the diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma. The patient died 4. months after the diagnosis of acute heart failure with multi-organ dysfunction, after a short period of improvement under chemotherapy. We present this case to highlight the importance to consider that a large, solitary, right atrial mass in conjunction with pericardial effusion in a patient with HIV infection should lead to consider, as soon as possible, the diagnosis of lymphoma. MRI has explained the conduction disorders by showing the septal extension of the mass, and by demonstrating right coronary artery involvement. © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS.


PubMed | Cardiology intensive care unit
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Annales de cardiologie et d'angeiologie | Year: 2014

A 44-year-old patient, with personal history of AIDS, was referred to our emergency unit with tachycardia and moderate signs of right-sided heart failure. The cardiac MRI study showed an impairment of the right ventricular free and inferior wall and the interventricular septum. The mass was characterized by notable heterogeneity with mixed areas of hypo- and hypersignal intensity in SSFP and T2-weighted images with fat saturation. There was global hyperenhancement of the mass after gadolinium contrast injection on T1-weighted images with and without fat saturation. The entire right coronary artery was included into the infiltrative mass. One day after the admission, the patient suddenly presented a paroxysmal third degree atrioventricular block, permanently corrected by an implanted cardiac pacemaker. Endomyocardial biopsy conformed the diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma. The patient died 4months after the diagnosis of acute heart failure with multi-organ dysfunction, after a short period of improvement under chemotherapy. We present this case to highlight the importance to consider that a large, solitary, right atrial mass in conjunction with pericardial effusion in a patient with HIV infection should lead to consider, as soon as possible, the diagnosis of lymphoma. MRI has explained the conduction disorders by showing the septal extension of the mass, and by demonstrating right coronary artery involvement.

Loading Cardiology Intensive Care Unit collaborators
Loading Cardiology Intensive Care Unit collaborators