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Yasuura M.,Kyushu University | Okazaki H.,Kyushu University | Tahara Y.,Kyushu University | Ikezaki H.,Intelligent Sensor Technology Inc. | Toko K.,Kyushu University
Sensors and Actuators, B: Chemical | Year: 2014

Objective taste evaluation has been much in demand in the food, beverage and pharmaceutical industries. A taste-sensing system, which is an electronic tongue with "global selectivity," is one of the methods used for objective taste evaluation. A taste sensor electrode responds to only one of the basic tastes (saltiness, sourness, sweetness, bitterness and umami) as a change in membrane potential caused by interactions with tastants. Sweet substances are compounds with diverse chemical structures and sizes. Since the taste-sensing system is a potentiometric measurement system using a change in membrane potential, three types of sweetness sensors are required, one for sweeteners with each type of electric charge (uncharged, positively charged and negatively charged). A sweetness sensor for uncharged sweeteners has been developed. Therefore, negatively charged sweeteners, such as saccharine sodium and acesulfame potassium, were chosen as the target substances in this study. We investigated the responses of various sensor membranes using a lipid and nine kinds of plasticizers to each basic taste sample. Furthermore, not only the selectivity of the membranes but also the concentration dependence of their response to sweeteners was investigated. As a result, one of the developed sensors showed responses of over 20 mV to 5 mM saccharine sodium and 10 mM acesulfame potassium in CPA value measurement (CPA: change in membrane potential caused by adsorption). On the other hand, the sensor also showed nearly zero responses to other basic taste samples. In addition, saltiness was the only interfering taste, and the responses to target substances in relative value measurement were over 140 mV. The developed sweetness sensor had high selectivity and concentration-dependent responses. Hence, we concluded that the sensor is suitable for use as a sweetness sensor for high-potency sweeteners with a negative electric charge. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. Source


Ikezaki H.,Intelligent Sensor Technology Inc.
IEEJ Transactions on Sensors and Micromachines | Year: 2015

In this paper, business application of the Taste Sensing System is described. Development races of private labelbrands are heating up in the domestic food industry. It is because consumer needs are diversifying year by year and need to respond them to survive in the market. Thorough pursuit of consumer needs is crucial in product developments. A taste sensor can visualize the needs into numerical data. As a result, a concept of product development becomes clear and therefore its target values are clarified. Besides that, cost reduction and a reduction in the number of raw materials can be possible by applying a mathematical optimization based on a database of sensor outputs. Effective appealing to buyers and consumers is realized by showing characteristics of a new product or renewal product in digitized taste data. In the global market, taste preferences depending on regions are not easy to understand and communicate with each other through their own languages. To understand the differences, a common taste measure is required. By using the measure of taste, it is possible to make smooth communication between producers of farm products and food manufactures. © 2015 The Institute of Electrical Engineers of Japan. Source


Ikezaki H.,Intelligent Sensor Technology Inc.
Yakugaku Zasshi | Year: 2014

In pharmaceutical fields, the palatability of drug formulation has been attracted, especially for children. It is excellent that pediatric medicines are delivered to a famine-stricken area on volunteer work. However, children cannot take extremely bitter drug because they are said to be highly sensitive to bitterness. Therefore, we contribute to the development of formulation palatable to children by providing pharmaceutical industry with "the measure of taste". In taste sensing technology, we established two methods to control the sensor's characteristics by optimizing both electric density and hydrophobicity of membrane. These innovative approaches enable the development advanced taste sensors to fulfill the 4 types of requirements: (1) The threshold of taste sensors must be the same as the human taste threshold; (2) Taste sensors must respond consistently to the same taste like the human tongue; (3) There must be a clearly defined unit of information from taste sensors; and (4) Taste sensors must detect interactions between taste substances. © 2014 The Pharmaceutical Society of Japan. Source


Yasuura M.,Kyushu University | Tahara Y.,Kyushu University | Ikezaki H.,Intelligent Sensor Technology Inc. | Toko K.,Kyushu University
Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) | Year: 2014

Taste evaluation technology has been developed by several methods, such as sensory tests, electronic tongues and a taste sensor based on lipid/polymer membranes. In particular, the taste sensor can individually quantify five basic tastes without multivariate analysis. However, it has proven difficult to develop a sweetness sensor, because sweeteners are classified into three types according to the electric charges in an aqueous solution; that is, no charge, negative charge and positive charge. Using membrane potential measurements, the taste-sensing system needs three types of sensor membrane for each electric charge type of sweetener. Since the commercially available sweetness sensor was only intended for uncharged sweeteners, a sweetness sensor for positively charged high-potency sweeteners such as aspartame was developed in this study. Using a lipid and plasticizers, we fabricated various lipid/polymer membranes for the sweetness sensor to identify the suitable components of the sensor membranes. As a result, one of the developed sensors showed responses of more than 20 mV to 10 mM aspartame and less than 5 mV to any other taste. The responses of the sensor depended on the concentration of aspartame. These results suggested that the developed sweetness sensor had high sensitivity to and high selectivity for aspartame. Source


Yasuura M.,Kyushu University | Tahara Y.,Kyushu University | Ikezaki H.,Intelligent Sensor Technology Inc. | Toko K.,Kyushu University
Sensors (Switzerland) | Year: 2014

Taste evaluation technology has been developed by several methods, such as sensory tests, electronic tongues and a taste sensor based on lipid/polymer membranes. In particular, the taste sensor can individually quantify five basic tastes without multivariate analysis. However, it has proven difficult to develop a sweetness sensor, because sweeteners are classified into three types according to the electric charges in an aqueous solution; that is, no charge, negative charge and positive charge. Using membrane potential measurements, the taste-sensing system needs three types of sensor membrane for each electric charge type of sweetener. Since the commercially available sweetness sensor was only intended for uncharged sweeteners, a sweetness sensor for positively charged high-potency sweeteners such as aspartame was developed in this study. Using a lipid and plasticizers, we fabricated various lipid/polymer membranes for the sweetness sensor to identify the suitable components of the sensor membranes. As a result, one of the developed sensors showed responses of more than 20 mV to 10 mM aspartame and less than 5 mV to any other taste. The responses of the sensor depended on the concentration ofaspartame. These results suggested that the developed sweetness sensor had high sensitivity to and high selectivity for aspartame. © 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Source

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