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Amadi-Echendu J.E.,University of Pretoria | Willett R.,University of Otago | Brown K.,Southern Cross University of Australia | Hope T.,Southampton Solent University | And 4 more authors.
Engineering Asset Management Review | Year: 2010

Definitions of asset management tend to be broad in scope, covering a wide variety of areas including general management, operations and production arenas and, financial and human capital aspects. While the broader conceptualisation allows a multifaceted investigation of physical assets, the arenas constitute a multiplicity of spheres of activity. We define engineering asset management in this paper as the total management of physical, as opposed to financial, assets. However, engineering assets have a financial dimension that reflects their economic value and the management of this value is an important part of overall engineering asset management. We also define more specifically what we mean by an "engineering asset" and what the management of such an asset entails. Our approach takes as its starting point the conceptualisation of asset management that posits it as an interdisciplinary field of endeavour and we include notions from commerce and business as well as engineering. The framework is also broad, emphasising the life-cycle of the asset. The paper provides a basis for analysing the general problem of physical asset management, relating engineering capability to economic cost and value in a highly integrated way. © Springer 2010.


Fillery B.P.,Integrated Asset Management | Fillery B.P.,University of Western Australia | Hu X.Z.,University of Western Australia
Engineering Fracture Mechanics | Year: 2012

A Compliance Adjusted Weight Function (CAWF) approach has been recently developed to enable the estimation of stress intensity factor in thermal shocked cracked hollow cylinders with finite boundary restraint. In this article the CAWF approach is used to analyse three case studies that collectively encompass the hollow cylinder configurations, crack configurations and load configurations with which this CAWF formulation is currently applicable. The results of these analyses highlight that the CAWF approach is suitable for estimates within 5-10% of benchmark fracture mechanics finite element values for a wide range of targeted cracked hollow cylinder configurations and boundary restraint. An exception occurs for the semi-elliptical surface cracked hollow cylinders, where a free boundary effect can be observed at a free or near free boundary restraint condition. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Fillery B.P.,Integrated Asset Management | Fillery B.P.,University of Western Australia | Hu X.Z.,University of Western Australia
Engineering Fracture Mechanics | Year: 2010

The evaluation of mode I stress intensity factor KITS associated with the creep-free thermal shock (TS) of finite length elastically/thermo-elastically restrained cracked hollow cylinders is a problem of interest. Among existing evaluation methodologies, the mechanical weight function approach is often perceived to be an optimal compromise between simplicity and accuracy for KITS and more generalised KI evaluation. However, to confidently apply a mechanical weight function methodology in such circumstances requires the derivation of different weight functions for each potential boundary restraint configuration, i.e. free, flexible or rigid boundary conditions. In this article, the traditional mechanical weight function philosophy is complimented with an elastic compliance analysis, enabling the mechanical weight function and geometry factors for an equivalent semi-infinite cracked hollow cylinder to be used to evaluate KITS associated with a wide range of finite length elastically/thermo-elastically restrained cracked hollow cylinders. The need for deriving different weight functions is therefore removed and the proposed Compliance Adjusted Weight Function (CAWF) approach becomes more 'user-friendly'. The targeted cracked hollow cylinders are assumed to exhibit an exterior circumferential edge crack or an exterior circumferential semi-elliptical surface crack. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Fillery B.P.,Integrated Asset Management | Fillery B.P.,University of Western Australia | Hu X.Z.,University of Western Australia
Journal of Thermal Stresses | Year: 2010

The evaluation of mode I stress intensity factor KTS 1 associated with the creep-free thermal shock (TS) of finite length elastically/thermoelastically restrained cracked plates is a problem of interest. Among existing evaluation methodologies, the mechanical weight function approach is often perceived to be an optimal compromise between simplicity and accuracy for KTS 1 evaluation. However, to confidently apply the mechanical weight function methodology in such circumstances requires the derivation of different weight functions for each potential boundary restraint configuration, i.e., free, flexible or rigid boundary conditions. In this article, the traditional mechanical weight function philosophy is complimented with an elastic compliance analysis, enabling the mechanical weight function and geometry factors for an equivalent semi-infinite cracked plate to be used to evaluate KTS 1 associated with finite length elastically/thermoelastically restrained cracked plates. The need for deriving different weight functions is therefore removed and the proposed Compliance Adjusted Weight Function (CAWF) approach becomes more user-friendly. The targeted cracked plates are assumed to exhibit an exterior through-the-thickness edge crack or an exterior through-the-thickness semi-elliptical surface crack. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.


Fillery B.P.,Integrated Asset Management | Fillery B.P.,University of Western Australia | Hu X.Z.,University of Western Australia
Journal of Thermal Stresses | Year: 2010

A Compliance Adjusted Weight Function (CAWF) approach has been recently developed to enable the estimation of stress intensity factor in thermal shocked cracked plates with finite boundary restraint. In this article the CAWF approach is used to analyse three case studies that collectively encompass the plate configurations, crack configurations and load configurations with which the CAWF is currently formulated. The results of these analyses highlight that the CAWF approach is suitable for estimates within 5-10% of benchmark fracture mechanics finite element values for a wide range of targeted cracked plate configurations and boundary restraint. An exception occurs for the semi-elliptical surface cracked plates where a free boundary effect can be observed at a free or near free boundary restraint condition. Copyright © 2010 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

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