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Poznań, Poland

Rudzki L.,Medical University of Bialystok | Frank M.,Instytut Mikroekologii | Szulc A.,Instytut Mikroekologii | Galecka M.,Instytut Mikroekologii | And 2 more authors.
Neuropsychiatria i Neuropsychologia | Year: 2012

Intestinal permeability dysfunction might be considered either a consequence or cause of systemic inflammation with release of proinflammatory cytokines. A growing body of evidence indicates a key role of the immune system and cytokines in depression. Cytokines cause tryptophan and 5-HT depletion and elevation of neurotoxic tryptophan catabolites by inducing indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Another enzyme causing elevation of tryptophan catabolites is tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), which is activated by cortisol, often elevated during depression. Additionally, pro-inflammatory cytokines activate noradrenergic neurotransmission and the HPA axis, and also cause glucocorticoid receptor resistance. There is a growing body of evidence indicating a role of increased intestinal permeability (leaky gut syndrome) in many chronic diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases, diabetes type I, allergy, asthma, autism, and depression. Numerous investigations indicate that many antidepressant drugs exhibit anti-inflammatory properties by lowering levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which might be related to their antidepressant mechanisms of action. A large group of anti-inflammatory substances and antioxidants also exhibit antidepressant potential or potentiate efficacy of antidepressant pharmacotherapy. The aim of the authors of this review is to present a potential relation between increased gut permeability, activation of the inflammatory response system, IgG food allergy (type III hypersensitivity reaction), and depression. Detection of a relationship between IgGdependent allergy and depression may form the basis for improving the therapeutic scheme.


Frank M.,Instytut Mikroekologii | Ignys I.,I Katedra Pediatrii | Galecka M.,Instytut Mikroekologii
Pediatria Polska | Year: 2012

IgG-dependent allergy may be one of a reason for the development or maintenance of the gastrointestinal diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Incorrect IgG-dependent reactions to food, result in formation of immune complex and consequently - chronic inflammation. An elimination diet based on the results of the study of specific IgG antibodies against the food antigens is beneficial in treatment of IBS, IBD and psychiatric disorders. © 2012 Polish Pediatric Society.


Frank M.,Instytut Mikroekologii | Ignys I.,I Katedra Pediatrii | Galecka M.,Instytut Mikroekologii | Szachta P.,Instytut Mikroekologii
Pediatria Polska | Year: 2013

The development of allergy process is caused by the negative influence of various factors on human organism. The reason for food allergy in a predisposed group of people is immunological mechanisms, which are classified in four types (according to Gell-Coombs). It is said that 50% of food allergy reaction is caused by IgE-dependent mechanism (immediate reaction). In the remaining group it is a retarded reaction (IgE-independent) or mixed (IgE-independent and IgE-dependent). It is claimed that an increase in the level of antibodies against particular food allergens could be one of reasons behind the development of the gastrointestinal symptoms. It should be emphasized that the role of IgG-dependent allergy is still being discussed and the results of research are inconclusive. Yet, there are analyses which show that an elimination diet based on the results of the study of specific IgG antibodies against the food antigens is beneficial in treatment of IBS, IBD and psychiatric disorders. That is why the authors of the above analysis decided to review the current data concerning the effectiveness of a diet based on the results of IgG-dependent allergy research in reducing the symptoms of particular health problems. © 2013 Polish Pediatric Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

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