Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz Instituto Oswaldo Cruz FIOCRUZ IOC

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz Instituto Oswaldo Cruz FIOCRUZ IOC

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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Silva A.B.,State University of Maranhão | Silva A.B.,Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz Instituto Oswaldo Cruz FIOCRUZ IOC | Vizzoni V.F.,Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz Instituto Oswaldo Cruz FIOCRUZ IOC | Costa A.P.,State University of Maranhão | And 5 more authors.
Acta Tropica | Year: 2017

The present study was performed in a non-endemic area for spotted fever (SF) in Imperatriz microregion, state of Maranhão, Brazil. Blood samples and ectoparasites were collected from 300 dogs of the Imperatriz microregion. Canine serum samples were tested individually by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA), using five Rickettsia isolates from Brazil. Antibodies reactive to at least one of the five species of Rickettsia were detected in 1.6% of the dogs (5/300). These sera were considered reactive to Rickettsia rickettsii and Rickettsia amblyommatis or very closely related species. The ticks (Acari: Ixodidae), identified as Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Latreille), and the fleas, identified as Ctenocephalides felis, were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of rickettsial DNA. More than 78% (83/106) of the C. felis fleas were found to be infected with Rickettsia species using gltA as rickettsial PCR targets, whereas no evidence of Rickettsia spp. was found in R. sanguineus s. l. Genetic analysis based on genes gltA, htrA and ompB showed that the detected strain, is most closely related to Rickettsia asembonensis (formerly Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis). The present study is the first report of a R. asembonensis related infecting C. felis fleas in Brazil. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.


Silva A.B.,Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz Instituto Oswaldo Cruz FIOCRUZ IOC | Duarte M.M.,Fundacao Ezequiel Dias FUNED | da Costa Cavalcante R.,Secretaria Estadual de Saude do Estado do Ceara | de Oliveira S.V.,Secretaria de Vigilancia em Saude | And 5 more authors.
Acta Tropica | Year: 2017

In Brazil, Spotted Fever (SF) is caused by Rickettsia rickettsii and Rickettsia parkeri strain Atlantic Forest. In recent years, several human cases of a milder SF have been reported from the Maciço de Baturité region of Ceará State. Previous studies in this region found R. parkeri strain Atlantic Forest to be present in Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato and Amblyomma ovale ticks. The present study isolated and identified the Rickettsia spp. present in this new endemic area in Brazil. In March 2015, R. sanguineus s.l. and A. ovale were collected in rural areas of the Maciço de Baturité region, and subjected to the isolation technique. A bacterium was isolated from one R. sanguineus s.l., which phylogenetic analysis clustered to the R. rickettsii group. In conclusion, R. rickettsii bacteria is circulating in the studied area and may in future have an impact on the clinical diagnoses and consequently cause changes in the profile of the disease in the region. In addition, we suggest the increase of epidemiological and environmental surveillance in the area, in order to prevent Brazilian Spotted Fever cases. © 2017


Viotti R.,Hospital Interzonal General Of Agudos Higa Eva Peron | Alarcon De Noya B.,Central University of Venezuela | Araujo-Jorge T.,Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz Instituto Oswaldo Cruz FIOCRUZ IOC | Grijalva M.J.,Pontifical Catholic University of Ecuador | And 9 more authors.
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy | Year: 2014

Treatment for Chagas disease with currently available medications is recommended universally only for acute cases (all ages) and for children up to 14 years old. The World Health Organization, however, also recommends specific antiparasite treatment for all chronic-phase Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals, even though in current medical practice this remains controversial, and most physicians only prescribe palliative treatment for adult Chagas patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. The present opinion, prepared by members of the NHEPACHA network (Nuevas Herramientas para el Diagnóstico y la Evaluación del Paciente con Enfermedad de Chagas/New Tools for the Diagnosis and Evaluation of Chagas Disease Patients), reviews the paradigm shift based on clinical and immunological evidence and argues in favor of antiparasitic treatment for all chronic patients. We review the tools needed to monitor therapeutic efficacy and the potential criteria for evaluation of treatment efficacy beyond parasitological cure. Etiological treatment should now be mandatory for all adult chronic Chagas disease patients. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

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