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Vega C.M.,Grupo de Estudos de Mamiferos Marinhos da Regiao dos Lagos GEMM Lagos | Siciliano S.,Grupo de Estudos de Mamiferos Marinhos da Regiao dos Lagos GEMM Lagos | Hacon S.S.,Escola Nacional de Saude Publica FIOCRUZ | Campos R.C.,Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro | And 2 more authors.
Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology | Year: 2010

Cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), and lead (Pb) were determined in samples of liver and breast muscles of first-year Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus), from two different areas on the Brazilian coast, 35 on the Rio de Janeiro coast and 12 on the Rio Grande do Sul coast. In both areas, Cd concentrations in muscle samples were <0.025 μg/g. However, the Cd and Hg concentrations found in liver and Hg concentrations found in muscle showed a significant difference between the two regions. The geometric mean of the concentrations was higher in the specimens from Rio de Janeiro (Cd-6.8 μg/g; Hg- liver, 1.6 μg/g, and muscle, 0.4 μg/g wet weight) than in those from Rio Grande do Sul (Cd-2.3 μg/g; Hg-liver, 0.9 μg/g, and muscle, 0.1 μg/g wet weight). The site differences could be related to differences in diet influenced by geographic factors. Brazil's southeastern coast is highlyurbanized, and its coastal waters are contaminated by the waste of agricultural and industrial activities. There is a lack of information on the levels of heavy metals in S. magellanicus, however, their wide distribution and top position in the trophic chain make the use of stranded specimens an attractive source of information for monitoring heavy metals in the South Atlantic coast. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009.


PubMed | Brazilian National Institute of Technology, Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs and Instituto Oswaldo Cruz IOC
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Brazilian journal of microbiology : [publication of the Brazilian Society for Microbiology] | Year: 2016

Considering the absence of standards for culture collections and more specifically for biological resource centers in the world, in addition to the absence of certified biological material in Brazil, this study aimed to evaluate a Fungal Collection from Fiocruz, as a producer of certified reference material and as Biological Resource Center (BRC). For this evaluation, a checklist based on the requirements of ABNT ISO GUIA34:2012 correlated with the ABNT NBR ISO/IEC17025:2005, was designed and applied. Complementing the implementation of the checklist, an internal audit was performed. An evaluation of this Collection as a BRC was also conducted following the requirements of the NIT-DICLA-061, the Brazilian internal standard from Inmetro, based on ABNT NBR ISO/IEC 17025:2005, ABNT ISO GUIA 34:2012 and OECD Best Practice Guidelines for BRCs. This was the first time that the NIT DICLA-061 was applied in a culture collection during an internal audit. The assessments enabled the proposal for the adequacy of this Collection to assure the implementation of the management system for their future accreditation by Inmetro as a certified reference material producer as well as its future accreditation as a Biological Resource Center according to the NIT-DICLA-061.


De Almeida D.T.,Federal University of Bahia | Nunes I.L.,Federal University of Bahia | Conde P.L.,Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs | Rosa R.P.S.,Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs | And 2 more authors.
Grasas y Aceites | Year: 2013

The characteristics of the quality of crude palm oil (CPO) and crude palm olein (CPOL) produced in the states of Bahia and Pará were investigated. Twelve oil samples were analyzed; 2 (CPO) were from Pará (produced industrially), while the other 10 were from Bahia (3 CPOs and 3 CPOLs produced industrially, while 1 CPOL and 3 CPOs were traditionally processed). The chemical analyses included the determination of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), free fatty acids (FFA%), peroxide value (PV), induction time (IT), total carotenoids (TC) and total polar compounds (TPC). The major saturated fatty acids in these samples were palmitic (34.79-42.89 g 100 g-1) and stearic (4.49-5.84 g 100 g-1) acid, and the main unsaturated fatty acids were oleic (37.31-43.69 g 100 g-1) and linoleic (9.04-12.74 g100 g-1) acid. All samples produced in Bahia exhibited higher FFA (6.77-13.49%) and TPC (13.71-19.50%) levels than permitted in the international quality standards, unlike the samples produced in Pará. TC, PV and IT ranged from 422.1 to 584.2 mg g-1, 1.32 to 3.7 meq O 2kg-1oil and 1.72 to 4.66 h, respectively. PV, FFA and TPC were inversely correlated with TC and IT. The use of inappropriate oil extraction processes in Bahia is clearly becoming a food safety problem.


Baio P.V.P.,State University of Rio de Janeiro | Baio P.V.P.,Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs | Baio P.V.P.,Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro | Ramos J.N.,State University of Rio de Janeiro | And 10 more authors.
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases | Year: 2013

Background:Nocardia sp. causes a variety of clinical presentations. The incidence of nocardiosis varies geographically according to several factors, such as the prevalence of HIV infections, transplants, neoplastic and rheumatic diseases, as well as climate, socio-economic conditions and laboratory procedures for Nocardia detection and identification. In Brazil the paucity of clinical reports of Nocardia infections suggests that this genus may be underestimated as a cause of human diseases and/or either neglected or misidentified in laboratory specimens. Accurate identification of Nocardia species has become increasingly important for clinical and epidemiological investigations. In this study, seven clinical Nocardia isolates were identified by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and their antimicrobial susceptibility was also determined. Most Nocardia isolates were associated to pulmonary disease.Methodology/Principal Findings:The majority of Brazilian human isolates in cases reported in literature were identified as Nocardia sp. Molecular characterization was used for species identification of Nocardia nova, Nocardia cyriacigeorgica, Nocardia asiatica and Nocardia exalbida/gamkensis. Data indicated that molecular analysis provided a different Nocardia speciation than the initial biochemical identification for most Brazilian isolates. All Nocardia isolates showed susceptibility to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, the antimicrobial of choice in the treatment nocardiosis. N. nova isolated from different clinical specimens from one patient showed identical antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and two distinct clones.Conclusions/Significance:Although Brazil is the world's fifth-largest country in terms of land mass and population, pulmonary, extrapulmonary and systemic forms of nocardiosis were reported in only 6 of the 26 Brazilian states from 1970 to 2013. A least 33.8% of these 46 cases of nocardiosis proved fatal. Interestingly, coinfection by two clones may occur in patients presenting nocardiosis. Nocardia infection may be more common throughout the Brazilian territory and in other developing tropical countries than is currently recognized and MLSA should be used more extensively as an effective method for Nocardia identification. © 2013 Baio et al.


Chaves J.S.C.,Especialista em Vigilancia Sanitaria | Marin V.A.,Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs
Jornal Brasileiro de Patologia e Medicina Laboratorial | Year: 2010

Introduction: External Quality Control (EQC) is an important tool for quality assurance, assisting the laboratory in evaluating the efficiency of the analytical phase of its processes. An erroneous result of an analysis hinders the conclusion of diagnosis and the suitable treatment prescription to be followed. Health inspections in Clinical Laboratories (CL) in the State of Rio de Janeiro are made based on a sanitary inspection procedure issued by Directive SES/CVS 743, June 2006, RDC 302/2005 and current Brazilian legislation. EQC results observed from the total of 347 inspections conducted by the Division of Clinical Analysis Laboratories of the Department of Health and Civil Defense (LAC-SESDEC) during the period under review are presented below: 44% of 133 inspections performed in Clinical Analysis Laboratories had no contract with a profciency testing provider in 2006;38% of 95 inspections conducted in Clinical Analysis Laboratories did not have a contract with any profciency testing provider in 2007; and 35% of 119 inspections conducted in Clinical Analysis Laboratories had no contract with any proficiency testing provider in 2008. Sixty-two percent (134 laboratories) of 214 CL inspected in the years 2007 and 2008 had EQC, however, 65% of them did not record the corrective actions related to the nonconformities identified in a report issued by the profciency testing provider. Method: In this study, we evaluated the percentage distribution of the results of health inspections conducted in CL in the State of Rio de Janeiro from 2006 to 2008, registered at SESDEC, stating the number of CL that did not meet health requirements (item: "External Quality Control - EQC-Directive 743/2006") and the nature and the sector of these laboratories: intra and extra hospital clinical laboratories (publicly or privately owned hospitals and outsourced hospitals). Objective: Statistic evaluation of EQC in CL in the State of Rio de Janeiro during the period under review as to the nature of these laboratories.


De Araujo E.M.,Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs | Martins E.S.,Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs | Adams C.E.,University of Nottingham | Coutinho E.S.F.,Fiocruz | Huf G.,Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs
Jornal Brasileiro de Psiquiatria | Year: 2010

Objective: To evaluate the use of restraints in a large psychiatric hospital in Rio de Janeiro city, Brazil. Methods: A survey was carried on in August 2009. Data on sex, age, diagnostic, use and duration of restraints were collected from patients' notes. Result: Sample consisted on 66 patients, 59% women, with mean age of 44 years. During the study 24% of the patients were restrained at least once, but registering details of the procedure was not usual. There were no important adverse events. No associations were observed between restraints and sociodemographic and clinic variables. Conclusions: The use of restraints is a consistent practice in Rio de Janeiro's psychiatric hospitals: the same proportion was observed in three hospitals in distinct periods, 2001 and 2004, and this finding is in an intermediate position in relation to other studies results. There are no randomized trials to properly evaluate the benefits and risks of this practice, but the efficacy and safety of this intervention should be subject to the same scientific scrutiny as other treatments.


Goncalves J.M.,Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs | de Souza M.D.C.,Federal University of Fluminense | Rocha R.C.C.,Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul | Medeiros R.J.,Laboratorio Of Experimentacao Animal Laean | Jacob S.C.,Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs
Ciencia Rural | Year: 2014

The concentrations of twenty-five elements (Al, As, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sb, Se, Sn, Sr, V and Zn) were determined in three edible mushrooms, Shiitake (Lentinula edodes), Black Shimeji (Pleurotus ostreatus) and Cardoncello (Pleurotus eryngyii) from Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Samples were collected along the year 2010 and their preparations were made after drying, milling, an acid pre-digestion and a decomposition procedure in a muffle furnace. The analytical techniques employed for the elements determination were Mass Spectrometry with Inductively Coupled Plasma and Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Two certified reference materials, Apple Leaves and Mussel Tissue, were used for the evaluation of the analytical procedure and recovery values around 98% were obtained. The results showed that the analyzed mushrooms have high levels of Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn and Zn containing more than 30% the recommended daily intake for these nutrients according to Brazilian legislation. These mushrooms presented a very low ratio Na/K. Regarding the levels of some contaminants, the mushrooms had concentrations of Cd, Pb and As below the recommended maximum limits allowed by Brazilian legislation.


Breves A.,Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs | Miranda C.A.C.,Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs | Flores C.,Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs | De Filippis I.,Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs | Clementino M.M.,Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs
Jornal Brasileiro de Patologia e Medicina Laboratorial | Year: 2015

Introduction: Cross-contamination by Staphylococcus aureus among patients, professionals and medical supplies in health facilities is a constant concern, leading many researchers to study the prevalence of this pathogen in asymptomatic carriers. Objectives: We investigated the colonization and the antimicrobial susceptibility profile of Staphylococcus spp. on surfaces of medical articles and in professionals from two basic health units in the city of Rio de Janeiro. Materials and methods: Seventy-nine samples resulted in 49 isolates which underwent phenotypic and molecular characterization by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of coa, mecA and femA genes. Results: According to the phenotypes, the isolates were identified as S. aureus (n = 35, 71.42%) and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) (n = 14, 28.57%). Among these 14 isolates, 42.85% were methicillin-resistant coagulase negative Staphylococcus (MRCoNS). Among the 35 S. aureus, 31.42% were methicillin resistant (MRSA), and 2.8% were vancomycin resistant, characterized as VRSA. Sixty-eight percent were susceptible to methicillin (MSSA). Genes coa, femA and mecA were amplified from 75.51%, 71.42% and 30.61% of the isolates, respectively. After amplification of the mecA gene, 20.41% were characterized as MRSA, and 10.20% as MRCoNS. The vancomycin-resistant strain was characterized as VRSA after detection of the vanB gene. Conclusion: Our results show a higher frequency of MSSA and MRCoNS among S. aureus and CoNS respectively, colonizing devices and health professionals. However, the already described transfer of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SSCmec) from MRCoNS to MSSA may alter these results, increasing the frequency of MRSA strains.


de Filippis I.,Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs | de Andrade C.F.,Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs | Caldeira N.,Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs | de Azevedo A.C.,Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs | de Almeida A.E.,Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs
Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases | Year: 2016

Background Several in-house PCR-based assays have been described for the detection of bacterial meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae from clinical samples. PCR-based methods targeting different bacterial genes are frequently used by different laboratories worldwide, but no standard method has ever been established. The aim of our study was to compare different in-house and a commercial PCR-based tests for the detection of bacterial pathogens causing meningitis and invasive disease in humans. Methods A total of 110 isolates and 134 clinical samples (99 cerebrospinal fluid and 35 blood samples) collected from suspected cases of invasive disease were analyzed. Specific sets of primers frequently used for PCR-diagnosis of the three pathogens were used and compared with the results achieved using the multiplex approach described here. Several different gene targets were used for each microorganism, namely ctrA, crgA and nspA for N. meningitidis, ply for S. pneumoniae, P6 and bexA for H. influenzae. Results All used methods were fast, specific and sensitive, while some of the targets used for the in-house PCR assay detected lower concentrations of genomic DNA than the commercial method. An additional PCR reaction is described for the differentiation of capsulated and non-capsulated H. influenzae strains, the while commercial method only detects capsulated strains. Conclusions The in-house PCR methods here compared showed to be rapid, sensitive, highly specific, and cheaper than commercial methods. The in-house PCR methods could be easily adopted by public laboratories of developing countries for diagnostic purposes. The best results were achieved using primers targeting the genes nspA, ply, and P6 which were able to detect the lowest DNA concentrations for each specific target. © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda.


PubMed | Instituto Nacional Of Controle Of Qualidade Em Saude Incqs
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Brazilian journal of infectious diseases : an official publication of the Brazilian Society of Infectious Diseases | Year: 2016

Several in-house PCR-based assays have been described for the detection of bacterial meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae from clinical samples. PCR-based methods targeting different bacterial genes are frequently used by different laboratories worldwide, but no standard method has ever been established. The aim of our study was to compare different in-house and a commercial PCR-based tests for the detection of bacterial pathogens causing meningitis and invasive disease in humans.A total of 110 isolates and 134 clinical samples (99 cerebrospinal fluid and 35 blood samples) collected from suspected cases of invasive disease were analyzed. Specific sets of primers frequently used for PCR-diagnosis of the three pathogens were used and compared with the results achieved using the multiplex approach described here. Several different gene targets were used for each microorganism, namely ctrA, crgA and nspA for N. meningitidis, ply for S. pneumoniae, P6 and bexA for H. influenzae.All used methods were fast, specific and sensitive, while some of the targets used for the in-house PCR assay detected lower concentrations of genomic DNA than the commercial method. An additional PCR reaction is described for the differentiation of capsulated and non-capsulated H. influenzae strains, the while commercial method only detects capsulated strains.The in-house PCR methods here compared showed to be rapid, sensitive, highly specific, and cheaper than commercial methods. The in-house PCR methods could be easily adopted by public laboratories of developing countries for diagnostic purposes. The best results were achieved using primers targeting the genes nspA, ply, and P6 which were able to detect the lowest DNA concentrations for each specific target.

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