Instituto Nacional Of Cancerologia Of Colombia

Bogotá, Colombia

Instituto Nacional Of Cancerologia Of Colombia

Bogotá, Colombia
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Yip C.-H.,University of Malaya | Cazap E.,SLACOM Sociedad Latinoamericana y del Caribe de Oncologia Medica | Anderson B.O.,University of Washington | Anderson B.O.,Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center | And 18 more authors.
Breast | Year: 2011

In middle resource countries (MRCs), cancer control programs are becoming a priority as the pattern of disease shifts from infectious diseases to non-communicable diseases such as breast cancer, the most common cancer among women in MRCs. The Middle Resource Scenarios Working Group of the BHGI 2010 Global Summit met to identify common issues and obstacles to breast cancer detection, diagnosis and treatment in MRCs. They concluded that breast cancer early detection programs continue to be important, should include clinical breast examination (CBE) with or without mammography, and should be coupled with active awareness programs. Mammographic screening is usually opportunistic and early detection programs are often hampered by logistical and financial problems, as well as socio-cultural barriers, despite improved public educational efforts. Although multidisciplinary services for treatment are available, geographical and economic limitations to these services can lead to an inequity in health care access. Without adequate health insurance coverage, limited personal finances can be a significant barrier to care for many patients. Despite the improved availability of services (surgery, pathology, radiology and radiotherapy), quality assurance programs remain a challenge. Better access to anticancer drugs is needed to improve outcomes, as are rehabilitation programs for survivors. Focused and sustained government health care financing in MRCs is needed to improve early detection and treatment of breast cancer. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Murillo R.,Instituto Nacional Of Cancerologia Of Colombia | Luna J.,Instituto Nacional Of Cancerologia Of Colombia | Gamboa O.,Instituto Nacional Of Cancerologia Of Colombia | Osorio E.,Laboratorio salud Publica | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics | Year: 2010

Objective: To assess the accuracy of visual inspection provided by nurses through combining acetic acid (VIA) and Lugol's iodine (VILI) in a low-resource region of Colombia. Methods: A cross-sectional study with 4957 women was conducted to evaluate visual inspection techniques as the basis for see-and-treat approaches in cervical cancer control. All women underwent conventional cytology, VIA performed by nurses, and a combination of VIA and VILI. All women underwent colposcopy and biopsies were obtained for any positive test. Results: A total of 762 women underwent biopsy, 4945 women were included in the analysis of conventional cytology, and 4957 were included in the analysis of VIA and VIA-VILI. Positivity rates were 1.3% and 4.3% for HSIL and LSIL cytology, 7.4% for VIA, and 10.1% for VIA-VILI. Sensitivity for cytology was 52.9% and 36.8% for LSIL and HSIL thresholds, 53.6% for VIA, and 68.1% for VIA-VILI. The corresponding specificity was 95.0%, 99.2%, 93.2%, and 90.8% respectively. The parallel combination of VIA-VILI and cytology LSIL-threshold revealed the best performance as a screening strategy. Conclusion: The use of VIA-VILI simulating colposcopic procedures and provided by nurses represents a good alternative for implementing see-and-treat programs in Latin America. Program constraints should be taken into account. © 2010 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.


De la Hoz F.,National University of Colombia | Alvis N.,University of Cartagena | Narvaez J.,National University of Colombia | Cediel N.,National University of Colombia | And 3 more authors.
Vaccine | Year: 2010

A complete economic study was carried out to assess the economical impact of two rotavirus vaccine in Colombia. A Markov decision model was built to assess the health outcomes from birth to 24 months of age for three hypothetical cohorts: one unvaccinated, one vaccinated with 2 doses of Rotarix™ and the third, with 3 doses of Rotateq™. Without vaccination, the annual number of medical visits by diarrhea in children under 2 years would be 1,293,159 cases, with 105,378 medical visits and 470 deaths (IC95% 295-560) related to rotavirus. Without vaccination, rotavirus disease would cost around USD$8 millions including direct and indirect costs. Assuming a cost per dose of USD$7.5, average cost-effectiveness ratio would be USD$663/DALY with Rotarix and USD$1391 with Rotateq. When price per dose falls below USD$7 both vaccines yield a similar average cost-effectiveness ratio (USD$1063/DALY). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of Rotateq versus Rotarix was USD$7787/DALY. Cost-effectiveness ratio was influenced mainly by vaccine cost and cost per case hospitalized. Other programmatic aspects such as number of doses to be applied, likelihood of completing vaccination schedule with shorter versus longer schedules, and storage space within the chain cold should be considered to make decisions on which vaccine should be introduced. In conclusion, vaccinating against rotavirus in Colombia with either vaccine would be very cost effective. If cost per vaccinated children falls below USD$3 per dose vaccination would be cost saving. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Hernandez-Suarez G.,Instituto Nacional Of Cancerologia Of Colombia | Hernandez-Suarez G.,Roslin Institute | Sanabria M.C.,Instituto Nacional Of Cancerologia Of Colombia | Sanabria M.C.,National University of Colombia | And 8 more authors.
European Journal of Human Genetics | Year: 2014

Colorectal cancer rates in Latin American countries are less than half of those observed in the United States. Latin Americans are the resultant of generations of an admixture of Native American, European, and African individuals. The potential role of genetic admixture in colorectal carcinogenesis has not been examined. We evaluate the association of genetic ancestry with colorectal neoplasms in 190 adenocarcinomas, 113 sporadic adenomas and 243 age-and sex-matched controls enrolled in a multicentric case-control study in Colombia. Individual ancestral genetic fractions were estimated using the STRUCTURE software, based on allele frequencies and assuming three distinct population origins. We used the Illumina Cancer Panel to genotype 1,421 sparse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and Northern and Western European ancestry, LWJ and Han Chinese in Beijing, China populations from the HapMap project as references. A total of 678 autosomal SNPs overlapped with the HapMap data set SNPs and were used for ancestry estimations. African mean ancestry fraction was higher in adenomas (0.13, 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=0.11-0.15) and cancer cases (0.14, 95% CI=0.12-0.16) compared with controls (0.11, 95% CI=0.10-0.12). Conditional logistic regression analysis, controlling for known risk factors, showed a positive association of African ancestry per 10% increase with both colorectal adenoma (odds ratio (OR)=1.12, 95% CI=0.97-1.30) and adenocarcinoma (OR=1.19, 95% CI=1.05-1.35). In conclusion, increased African ancestry (or variants linked to it) contributes to the increased susceptibility of colorectal cancer in admixed Latin American population. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.


Bedoya A.M.,University of Antioquia | Gaviria A.M.,University of Antioquia | Gaviria A.M.,Major College of Antioquia | Baena A.,University of Antioquia | And 6 more authors.
International Journal of Gynecological Cancer | Year: 2012

Objective: The study's objective was to estimate human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype- specific seroprevalence to determine population HPV exposure and inform vaccine policy. Methods: This study is a cross-sectional prevalence survey of 878 women of Pueblorrico, a rural town of Colombia. A standardized questionnaire was used to obtain information on demographic characteristics, sexual and reproductive history, and smoking habits. Seropositivity to HPV-16, -18, -31, and -58 was determined by virus-like particles in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Overall seropositivity to any HPV genotype was 27.9%. The combined sero-prevalence of women 15 to 19 and 20 to 24 years old was 35.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 25.9-46.2) and 36.0% (95% CI, 27.7-45.3), respectively. Seroprevalence for HPV-16 was 17% (95% CI, 14.6-19.6); for HPV-18, 9.8% (95% CI, 8.0-11.9); for HPV-31, 11.4% (95% CI, 9.5-13.7); and for HPV 58, 12.5% (95% CI, 10.5-14.9). Higher HPV seropositivity was associated with the lifetime number of occasional sexual partners (odds ratio, 3.05; 95% CI, 1.26-7.37) and having more than 2 regular sexual partners (odds ratio, 3.00; 95% CI, 1.21-7.45) in women younger than 44 and older than 45 years old, respectively. Use of oral contraceptives and tobacco/cigarettes was significantly associated with reduced HPV seropositivity in women older than 45 but not in women younger than 44 years old. Conclusions: Human papillomavirus seropositivity is associated with measures of sexual behavior, particularly a greater lifetime number of sexual partners. Hormonal and tobacco/ cigarette use may be factors influencing the HPV seropositivity in women older than 45 years old. Copyright © 2012 by IGCS and ESGO.


PubMed | Instituto Nacional Of Cancerologia Of Colombia
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics: the official organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics | Year: 2010

To assess the accuracy of visual inspection provided by nurses through combining acetic acid (VIA) and Lugols iodine (VILI) in a low-resource region of Colombia.A cross-sectional study with 4957 women was conducted to evaluate visual inspection techniques as the basis for see-and-treat approaches in cervical cancer control. All women underwent conventional cytology, VIA performed by nurses, and a combination of VIA and VILI. All women underwent colposcopy and biopsies were obtained for any positive test.A total of 762 women underwent biopsy, 4945 women were included in the analysis of conventional cytology, and 4957 were included in the analysis of VIA and VIA-VILI. Positivity rates were 1.3% and 4.3% for HSIL and LSIL cytology, 7.4% for VIA, and 10.1% for VIA-VILI. Sensitivity for cytology was 52.9% and 36.8% for LSIL and HSIL thresholds, 53.6% for VIA, and 68.1% for VIA-VILI. The corresponding specificity was 95.0%, 99.2%, 93.2%, and 90.8% respectively. The parallel combination of VIA-VILI and cytology LSIL-threshold revealed the best performance as a screening strategy.The use of VIA-VILI simulating colposcopic procedures and provided by nurses represents a good alternative for implementing see-and-treat programs in Latin America. Program constraints should be taken into account.


Aponte-Gonzalez J.,National University of Colombia | Fajardo-Bernal L.,National University of Colombia | Diaz J.,National University of Colombia | Eslava-Schmalbach J.,National University of Colombia | And 2 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Objective: To compare costs and effectiveness of three strategies used against cervical cancer (CC) and genital warts: (i) Screening for CC; (ii) Bivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 16/18 vaccine added to screening; (iii) Quadrivalent HPV 6/11/16/18 vaccine added to screening. Methods: A Markov model was designed in order to simulate the natural history of the disease from 12 years of age (vaccination) until death. Transition probabilities were selected or adjusted to match the HPV infection profile in Colombia. A systematic review was undertaken in order to derive efficacy values for the two vaccines as well as for the operational characteristics of the cytology test. The societal perspective was used. Effectiveness was measured in number of averted Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYS). Results: At commercial prices reported for 2010 the two vaccines were shown to be non-cost-effective alternatives when compared with the existing screening strategy. Sensitivity analyses showed that results are affected by the cost of vaccines and their efficacy values, making it difficult to determine with certainty which of the two vaccines has the best cost-effectiveness profile. To be 'cost-effective' vaccines should cost between 141 and 147 USD (Unite States Dollars) per vaccinated girl at the most. But at lower prices such as those recommended by WHO or the price of other vaccines in Colombia, HPV vaccination could be considered very cost-effective. Conclusions: HPV vaccination could be a convenient alternative for the prevention of CC in Colombia. However, the price of the vaccine should be lower for this vaccination strategy to be cost-effective. It is also important to take into consideration the willingness to pay, budgetary impact, and program implications, in order to determine the relevance of a vaccination program in this country, as well as which vaccine should be selected for use in the program. © 2013 Aponte-González et al.


PubMed | National Tsing Hua University, Instituto Nacional Of Cancerologia Of Colombia and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of cancer | Year: 2016

The lack of breast cancer screening in low and middle-income countries results in later stage diagnosis and worsened outcomes for women. A cluster randomized trial was performed in Bogot, Colombia between 2008 and 2012 to evaluate effects of opportunistic breast cancer screening. Thirteen clinics were randomized to an intervention arm and 13 to a control arm. Physicians in intervention clinics were instructed to perform clinical breast examination on all women aged 50-69 years attending clinics for non-breast health issues, and then refer them for mammographic screening. Physicians in control clinics were not explicitly instructed to perform breast screening or mammography referrals, but could do so if they thought it indicated (usual care). Women were followed for 2-years postrandomization. 7,436 women were enrolled and 7,419 (99.8%) screened in intervention clinics, versus 8,419 enrolled and 1,108 (13.1%) screened in control clinics. Incidence ratios (IR) of early, advanced and all breast cancers were 2.9 (95% CI 1.1-9.2), 1.0 (0.3-3.5) and 1.9 (0.9-4.1) in the first (screening) year of the trial, and the cumulative IR for all breast cancers converged to 1.4 (0.7-2.8) by the end of follow-up (Year 2). Eighteen (69.2%) of 26 women with early stage disease had breast conservation surgery (BCS) versus 6 (42.5%) of 14 women with late-stage disease (p = 0.02). Fifteen (68.2%) of 22 women with breast cancer in the intervention group had BCS versus nine (50.0%) of 18 women in the control group (p = 0.34). Well-designed opportunistic clinic-based breast cancer screening programs may be useful for early breast cancer detection in LMICs.


PubMed | Instituto Nacional Of Cancerologia Of Colombia
Type: | Journal: Infectious diseases in obstetrics and gynecology | Year: 2010

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines have been considered potentially cost-effective for the reduction of cervical cancer burden in developing countries; their effectiveness in a public health setting continues to be researched. We conducted an HPV prevalence survey among Colombian women with invasive cancer. Paraffin-embedded biopsies were obtained from one high-risk and one low-middle-risk regions. GP5+/GP6+ L1 primers, RLB assays, and E7 type specific PCR were used for HPV-DNA detection. 217 cases were analyzed with 97.7% HPV detection rate. HPV-16/18 prevalence was 63.1%; HPV-18 had lower occurrence in the high-risk population (13.8% versus 9.6%) allowing for the participation of less common HPV types; HPV-45 was present mainly in women under 50 and age-specific HPV type prevalence revealed significant differences. Multiple high-risk infections appeared in 16.6% of cases and represent a chance of replacement. Age-specific HPV prevalence and multiple high-risk infections might influence vaccine impact. Both factors highlight the role of HPVs other than 16/18, which should be considered in cost-effectiveness analyses for potential vaccine impact.


PubMed | Instituto Nacional Of Cancerologia Of Colombia
Type: | Journal: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV | Year: 2016

To determine survival of a cohort of patients with acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM), treated at the National Cancer Institute of Colombia, the largest referral hospital of the country.All patients diagnosed with an invasive ALM between 2003 and 2009 at the Colombian National Cancer Institute were included for analyses and followed for vital status and date of death. Using Kaplan-Meier methods, overall survival at 1, 3 and 5 years post diagnosis was determined, and Cox proportional hazards models were constructed for the variables showing a significant effect on survival in univariate analyses.Overall survival of this cohort of 90 patients was 77% at 1 year, 59% at 3 years and 54% at 5 years after diagnosis. Females had a better prognosis in univariate analyses but this advantage disappeared in multivariate models. Clinical stage was a strong predictor of survival, in univariate and multivariate models, particularly among elderly patients.Prognosis of ALM in Colombia is relatively poor, particularly for patients with higher clinical stage. The large proportions of ALM diagnosed in stage III and IV explain the relatively poor survival, and illustrate the importance of improving prognosis by lowering stage at diagnosis through better education and early detection programmes.

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