Entity

Time filter

Source Type


This paper integrates archaeobotanical research conducted in Antofagasta de la Sierra based on the identification, anatomy, and use of both present plant resources and archaeological plant remains, recovered during fieldwork between 1994 and 2000. Transects starting from the archaeological sites, the surrounding plant communities, and the species found are described. Characterization of present plant diversity also included the popular name and actual use of every species. Archaeological plant remains were identified by anatomy in comparison with present plant species in the studied area and their anatomical characters are here described and documented with digital images taken with compound microscope (bright field) and scanning electron microscope. Finally, discussion includes past and present use of every species recovered in the archaeological sites from Antofagasta de la Sierra, highlighting those aspects that imply change or continuity through time. Source


Guerreiro C.,Institute Botanica Darwinion | De Agrasar Z.E.R.,Institute Botanica Darwinion | Fernanda Rodriguez M.,Institute Botanica Darwinion | Fernanda Rodriguez M.,Instituto Nacional Of Antropologia Y Pensamiento Latinoamericano
Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society | Year: 2013

Chusquea Kunth and Rhipidocladum McClure species (Poaceae, Bambusoideae, Bambuseae) are the only two genera of woody bamboos whose distributions reach the southernmost portion of the Andes mountain range. The identification of woody bamboos relies mainly on vegetative characters. In the present work, foliage leaf blade anatomy of Andean woody bamboo species occurring in Argentina and neighboring areas is described. Eight species are surveyed: Chusquea culeou E. Desv., C. deficiens Parodi, C. lorentziana Griseb., C. montana Phil., C. quila Kunth, C. valdiviensis Phil., Rhipidocladum neumannii Sulekic, Rúgolo & L. G. Clark and R. racemiflorum (Steud.) McClure. Leaf blade abaxial epidermal and cross section characters of each species are described and an identification key based on anatomical characters is provided. Anatomical evidence that support the idea of C. quila and C. valdiviensis as different species is presented and information on useful characters to distinguish between them is provided. Also, taxonomic position of R. neumannii is determined based on anatomical features. Finally, the taxa studied are compared in tables based on leaf anatomical characters of taxonomic value. © Torrey Botanical Club. Source


Guerreiro C.,Institute Botanica Darwinion | Rodriguez M.F.,Institute Botanica Darwinion | Rodriguez M.F.,Instituto Nacional Of Antropologia Y Pensamiento Latinoamericano | de Agrasar Z.E.R.,Institute Botanica Darwinion
Kew Bulletin | Year: 2013

Summary: Six genera of woody bamboos (Poaceae, Bambusoideae, Bambuseae) occur along the Andes, but only two reach the southernmost portion of this mountain range, Chusquea Kunth and Rhipidocladum McClure. In woody bamboos, the identification of new anatomical characters bears a considerable taxonomic significance contributing to the determination of vegetative material. In the present work, culm anatomy of Andean woody bamboo species occurring in Argentina and neighbouring areas is described. Eight species are surveyed: C. culeou E. Desv., C. deficiens Parodi, C. lorentziana Griseb., C. montana Phil., C. quila Kunth, C. valdiviensis Phil., R. neumannii Sulekic, Rúgolo & L. G. Clark and R. racemiflorum (Steud.) McClure. Culm epidermal and cross sectional characters of each species are described and an identification key based on anatomical characters is provided. Culm anatomical characters of C. montana, C. quila and C. valdiviensis are presented for the first time. Also, anatomical evidence that support the idea of C. quila and C. valdiviensis as different species is presented and information on useful characters to distinguish between them is provided. The taxa studied are compared in tables based on culm anatomical characters of taxonomic value. © 2013 The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Source


Laura Lopez M.,Museo de Ciencias Naturales de La Plata | Capparelli A.,Museo de Ciencias Naturales de La Plata | Nielsen A.E.,Instituto Nacional Of Antropologia Y Pensamiento Latinoamericano
Darwiniana | Year: 2012

On the basis of an ethnoarchaeological study of post-harvest quinoa processing in the Lípez Altiplano (Potosí, Bolivia), some diagnostic traits of each activity and methods of processing dried grains are established. The potential of these observations to investigate the ancient practices of processing and consumption of this pseudocereal is illustrated by analyzing grains recovered from four archaeological sites near Salar de Uyuni. The quinoas examined were at different stages of processing; some showed no traces of saponin extraction, suggesting that they had been stored immediately after harvest, while others exhibited saponification traces comparable to those observed in current contexts, suggesting that they had been prepared for consumption. Source


Maier M.S.,University of Buenos Aires | Gomez B.A.,University of Buenos Aires | Parera S.D.,University of Buenos Aires | Elkin D.,Instituto Nacional Of Antropologia Y Pensamiento Latinoamericano | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Molecular Structure | Year: 2010

Different types of materials found in association with a human skeleton found in an 18th century shipwreck in Patagonia (Argentina) were analyzed by means of OM, SEM-EDX, HPLC, and chemical analysis. Alizarin and purpurin, the main anthraquinones of the dye plant Rubia tinctorum L. (madder) were identified as the coloring matter of a red fabric attached to the skeleton. Metallographic and chemical analysis of one of the dome-shaped buttons associated to the human bones revealed that it was composed of a Pb-Sn-Cu alloy known as pewter. The results obtained support the hypothesis that the remains originally were part of a private marine uniform. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Source

Discover hidden collaborations