Instituto Conmemorativo Gorgas Of Estudio Of La Salud

Panama, Peru

Instituto Conmemorativo Gorgas Of Estudio Of La Salud

Panama, Peru
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DeWalt R.E.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Grubbs S.A.,Western Kentucky University | Armitage B.J.,Instituto Conmemorativo Gorgas Of Estudio Of La Salud | Baumann R.W.,Brigham Young University | And 2 more authors.
Biodiversity Data Journal | Year: 2016

Background We provide volume II of a distributional atlas of aquatic insects for the eastern USA state of Ohio. This treatment of stoneflies (Plecoptera) is companion to Armitage et al. (2011) on caddisflies (Trichoptera). We build on a recent analysis of Ohio stonefly diversity patterns based on large drainages (DeWalt et al. 2012), but add 3717 new records to the data set. We base most analyses on the United States Geological Survey Hierarchical Unit Code eight (HUC8) drainage scale. In addition to distributional maps for each species, we provide analyses of species richness versus HUC8 drainage area and the number of unique locations in a HUC8 drainage, species richness versus Ohio counties, analyze adult presence phenology throughout the year, and demonstrate stream size range affiliation for each species.New information This work is based on a total of 7797 specimen records gathered from 21 regional museums, agency data, personal collections, and from the literature Table 1. To our knowledge this is the largest stonefly data set available for a similarly sized geopolitical area anywhere in the world. These data are made available as a Darwin Core Archive supported by the Pensoft Integrated Publishing Toolkit (DeWalt et al. 2016b). All known published papers reporting stoneflies from Ohio are detailed in Suppl. material 1. We recovered 102 species from Ohio, including all nine Nearctic families Table 2 . Two species were removed from the DeWalt et al. (2012) list and two new state records added. Perlidae (32 spp.) was most speciose, compared to the low diversity Pteronarcyidae (2 spp.) and Peltoperlidae (1 sp.). The richest HUC8 drainages occurred in northeastern, south-central, and southern regions of the state where drainages were heavily forested, had the highest slopes, and were contained within or adjacent to the unglaciated Allegheny and Appalachian Plateaus. Species poor drainages occurred mainly in the northwestern region where Wisconsinan aged lake plains climaxed to an expansive wooded wetland, the Black Swamp. The unglaciated Lower Scioto drainage (72 spp.) in south-central Ohio supported the greatest species richness. There was no relationship between species richness and HUC8 drainage size, but the number of unique locations in a drainage strongly related to species richness. All Ohio counties were represented in the data set with Hocking County (59 spp.) of the Lower Scioto drainage being the richest and most heavily sampled. Adult presence phenology was influenced by phylogenetic relationships such that the superfamily Nemouroidea (Capniidae, Leuctridae, Nemouridae, and Taeniopterygidae) generally emerged in winter and spring while the superfamilies Pteronarcyoidea (Pteronarcyidae, Peltoperlidae) and Perloidea (Chloroperlidae, Perlidae, Perlodidae) emerged later, some species continuing emergence through summer months. Species often occupied specific stream size ranges, while others were generalists. Two species once histrorically abundant in the western Lake Erie Bass Islands no longer reside there. Each of the 102 species is discussed in detail, including several that require additional collecting efforts to confirm their identities, presence, and distribution in Ohio. © DeWalt R et al.


Sanchez E.,Laboratorio Of Zoonosis Parasitaria | Sanchez E.,Instituto Oswaldo Cruz Fioruz | Caceres O.,Instituto Nacional Of Salud | Naquira C.,Laboratorio Of Zoonosis Parasitaria | And 5 more authors.
Memorias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz | Year: 2012

The identification of the genotypes of Echinococcus granulosus present in livestock and wild animals within regions endemic for cystic echinococcosis (CE) is epidemiologically important. Individual strains display different biological characteristics that contribute to outbreaks of CE and that must be taken into account in the design of intervention programs. In this study, samples of hydatid cysts due to E. granulosus were collected from alpacas (4) in Puno and pigs (8) in Ayacucho in Peru, an endemic region for CE. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and DNA sequencing of specific regions of the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1 and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 genes confirmed the presence of a strain common to sheep, the G1 genotype, in alpacas. Two different strains of E. granulosus were identified in pigs: the G1 and the G7 genotypes. This is the first report of the G1 genotype of E. granulosus in alpacas in endemic regions of CE in Peru.


PubMed | U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, University of America, Instituto Conmemorativo Gorgas Of Estudio Of La Salud, Brigham Young University and Western Kentucky University
Type: | Journal: Biodiversity data journal | Year: 2016

We provide volume II of a distributional atlas of aquatic insects for the eastern USA state of Ohio. This treatment of stoneflies (Plecoptera) is companion to Armitage et al. (2011) on caddisflies (Trichoptera). We build on a recent analysis of Ohio stonefly diversity patterns based on large drainages (DeWalt et al. 2012), but add 3717 new records to the data set. We base most analyses on the United States Geological Survey Hierarchical Unit Code eight (HUC8) drainage scale. In addition to distributional maps for each species, we provide analyses of species richness versus HUC8 drainage area and the number of unique locations in a HUC8 drainage, species richness versus Ohio counties, analyze adult presence phenology throughout the year, and demonstrate stream size range affiliation for each species.This work is based on a total of 7797 specimen records gathered from 21 regional museums, agency data, personal collections, and from the literature Table 1. To our knowledge this is the largest stonefly data set available for a similarly sized geopolitical area anywhere in the world. These data are made available as a Darwin Core Archive supported by the Pensoft Integrated Publishing Toolkit (DeWalt et al. 2016b). All known published papers reporting stoneflies from Ohio are detailed in Suppl. material 1. We recovered 102 species from Ohio, including all nine Nearctic families Table 2. Two species were removed from the DeWalt et al. (2012) list and two new state records added. Perlidae (32 spp.) was most speciose, compared to the low diversity Pteronarcyidae (2 spp.) and Peltoperlidae (1 sp.). The richest HUC8 drainages occurred in northeastern, south-central, and southern regions of the state where drainages were heavily forested, had the highest slopes, and were contained within or adjacent to the unglaciated Allegheny and Appalachian Plateaus. Species poor drainages occurred mainly in the northwestern region where Wisconsinan aged lake plains climaxed to an expansive wooded wetland, the Black Swamp. The unglaciated Lower Scioto drainage (72 spp.) in south-central Ohio supported the greatest species richness. There was no relationship between species richness and HUC8 drainage size, but the number of unique locations in a drainage strongly related to species richness. All Ohio counties were represented in the data set with Hocking County (59 spp.) of the Lower Scioto drainage being the richest and most heavily sampled. Adult presence phenology was influenced by phylogenetic relationships such that the superfamily Nemouroidea (Capniidae, Leuctridae, Nemouridae, and Taeniopterygidae) generally emerged in winter and spring while the superfamilies Pteronarcyoidea (Pteronarcyidae, Peltoperlidae) and Perloidea (Chloroperlidae, Perlidae, Perlodidae) emerged later, some species continuing emergence through summer months. Species often occupied specific stream size ranges, while others were generalists. Two species once histrorically abundant in the western Lake Erie Bass Islands no longer reside there. Each of the 102 species is discussed in detail, including several that require additional collecting efforts to confirm their identities, presence, and distribution in Ohio.


Caceres L.,Instituto Conmemorativo Gorgas Of Estudio Of La Salud | Rovira J.,Instituto Conmemorativo Gorgas Of Estudio Of La Salud | Garcia A.,Instituto Conmemorativo Gorgas Of Estudio Of La Salud | Torres R.,Instituto Conmemorativo Gorgas Of Estudio Of La Salud
Biomedica | Year: 2011

Introduction: The susceptibility of Anopheles albimanus to organophosphates, carbamates and pyrethroid insecticides was unknown in the Panama communities of Aguas Claras, Pintupo and Puente Bayano, located in the Amerindian Reservation of Madungandi. This region is considered a malaria transmission area, where An. albimanus is the main vector. Objective: The resistance to organophosphate insecticides, carbamates and pyrethroids was evaluated in field populations of the Anopheles albimanus in Panama. Materials and Methods: Progeny of An. albimanus collected in three localities in the indigenous Madugandi region were exposed to bioassays of susceptibility to organophosphate insecticides (fenitrothion, malathion and chlorpyrifos), the carbamate (propoxur) and pyrethroids (deltamethrin, lambdacyhalothrin, cyfluthrin and cypermethrin). The protocols were in accordance with those established for adult mosquitoes by World Health Organization. Results: The three strains of the An. albimanus were resistant to the pyrethroid insecticides deltamethrin, lambdacyhalothrin, cyfluthrin and cypermethrin. Susceptibility remained for the organophosphate insecticides fenitrothion, malathion, chlorpyrifos, and the carbamate insecticide propoxur. Conclusion: The results provided important information to the vector control program, contributing to the application of new strategies on the use of insecticides, and thereby lengthening the life of the insecticide in use.


PubMed | Instituto Conmemorativo Gorgas Of Estudio Of La Salud
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Biomedica : revista del Instituto Nacional de Salud | Year: 2012

The susceptibility of Anopheles albimanus to organophosphates, carbamates and pyrethroid insecticides was unknown in the Panama communities of Aguas Claras, Pintupo and Puente Bayano, located in the Amerindian Reservation of Madungandi. This region is considered a malaria transmission area, where An. albimanus is the main vector.The resistance to organophosphate insecticides, carbamates and pyrethroids was evaluated in field populations of the Anopheles albimanus in Panama.Progeny of An. albimanus collected in three localities in the indigenous Madugandi region were exposed to bioassays of susceptibility to organophosphate insecticides (fenitrothion, malathion and chlorpyrifos), the carbamate (propoxur) and pyrethroids (deltamethrin, lambdacyhalothrin, cyfluthrin and cypermethrin). The protocols were in accordance with those established for adult mosquitoes by World Health Organization.The three strains of the An. albimanus were resistant to the pyrethroid insecticides deltamethrin, lambdacyhalothrin, cyfluthrin and cypermethrin. Susceptibility remained for the organophosphate insecticides fenitrothion, malathion, chlorpyrifos, and the carbamate insecticide propoxur.The results provided important information to the vector control program, contributing to the application of new strategies on the use of insecticides, and thereby lengthening the life of the insecticide in use.

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