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Prada Gomez G.E.,Industrial University of Santander | Gutierrez M.P.,Instituto Colombiano Of Bienestar Familiar Icbf | Sanchez X.L.,Industrial University of Santander | Rueda L.P.,Industrial University of Santander | Angarita A.,Industrial University of Santander
Revista Chilena de Nutricion | Year: 2014

The association of environmental factors and child rearing practices with body mass index z-score (BMIZ) in children residents of Children’s Homes from Floridablanca, Colombia was studied. A random sample of 176 preschool children aged 3-6 years was weighed and measured, their parents or caregiver were also measured and they answered a survey. The generalized linear model showed that BMIZ increased significantly with children’s age (β=0.02), children’s sex (male β=0.27), mother’s occupation (homemaker β=0.29), mother’s overweight (β=0.20), person who accompanies children while they eat (relatives β=0,49; anyone or non-relative β=0.40), person who cooks (grandmother β=0.55), adequate time spent on eating by children (β=0.54), and overeating (0.51). BMIZ decreased significantly with mother’s occupation (looking for a job or student β=-0.43), maternal history of hypertension (β=-0.26), motivation to eat (β=-0.59) and pressure to eat (β=-0.55). © 2014 Sociedad Chilena de Nutricion Bromatologia y Toxilogica. All rights reserved. Source


Angarita A.,Industrial University of Santander | Martinez A.,Instituto Colombiano Of Bienestar Familiar Icbf | Rangel C.,Instituto Colombiano Of Bienestar Familiar Icbf | Betancourt M.V.,Industrial University of Santander | Prada Gomez G.E.,Industrial University of Santander
Revista Chilena de Nutricion | Year: 2014

Objective: To identify the factors determining the underestimation of the actual weight of the children by the father and mother of preschooler users of Children’s homes (CH) of the Colombian Family Welfare Institute located in the municipality of Floridablanca, Colombia. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional study was done in a random sample of 186 preschool children aged 3-6 years from 7 Floridablanca’s CH. Researchers interviewed parents and measured weight and height of children, parents, and caregivers. The analysis was conducted by way of single and multiple binomial regression models. Results: Underestimating the weight of the children was 44.6%, 46.3%, 45% and 44.2% for the mother, father, grandparents and uncles, respectively. The underestimation was associated with the child’ sex (mother: 1.59 95% CI 1.11-2.29 RP; father: PR 2.00 95% CI 1.1-3.6), education (PR 1.42 95 1.05-1.92%), occupation (PR 1.05 95% CI 1.05-1.05) and obesity’s history in the mother (PR 1.51 95% CI 1.10-2.08) and the current weight of the father (PR 2.31 95% CI 1.1 to 5.0). Conclusions: A high proportion of families of children do not perceive overweight and obesity. Issues such as the child’s sex, occupation and education of the mother and obesity in both parents must be considered when we will educate parents on the recognition of obesity as a public health problem. © 2014, Sociedad Chilena de Nutricion Bromatologia y Toxilogica. All rights reserved. Source


Abadia X.R.,Instituto Colombiano Of Bienestar Familiar Icbf | Abadia X.R.,Centro Internacional Of Agricultura Tropical Ciat | Pazos S.C.,Instituto Colombiano Of Bienestar Familiar Icbf | Pazos S.C.,Centro Internacional Of Agricultura Tropical Ciat | And 4 more authors.
Archivos Latinoamericanos de Nutricion | Year: 2010

For social programs in Colombia, like those administered by the Instituto Colombiano de Bienestar Familiar (ICBF), it's important to know what native foods minority groups consume. This research obtained information on native foods consumed by indigenous and afro-descendents living in 10 Colombian departments: Cauca, Nariño, Amazonas, Chocó, Guainía, Vichada, Magdalena, Guajira, Cesar y Vaupés. A questionnaire was applied to key informants (individually or in groups), addressing the following topics: personal information on the informant, name and type of food, if consumed by indigenous and/or afro-Colombians, climate where produced, time of year when harvested, if consumed raw or cooked, preparations, properties ascribed to the food, and current production, use and availability. Key informants included participants in ICBF's programs, indigenous authorities, teachers, traditional healers, and others, under the supervision of professionals from ICBF's mobile unit in each department. Bibliography (n=123 documents) was compiled and reviewed. In the departments selected, 13 municipalities were visited, 139 individuals were interviewed and at least 92 new foods (i.e., not currently included in the Colombian Food Composition Table) were identified. Among the 92, the scientific name was obtained for 62 foods. Of these, 2 were classified as other, 18 as meats, 3 as insects, and 39 as plants. Among the plants, informants mentioned fruit (n=29), leaves (n=4), seed (n=3) and roots (n=3). Indigeneous and afro-descendent communities in Colombia report consuming dozens of foods that are not currently in the Colombian Food Composition Table. Keys words: Indigenous food, indigenous community, afro-descendant population, Colombia, ICBF. Source

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