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Aleman M.,University of Barcelona | Bou R.,University of Barcelona | Bou R.,Instituto Ciencia Y Tecnologia Of Alimentos Y Nutricion Ictan Csic | Guardiola F.,University of Barcelona | And 4 more authors.
Food Chemistry | Year: 2015

The antioxidative effect of lipophilized caffeic acid was assessed in two different fish oil enriched food products: mayonnaise and milk. In both emulsion systems, caffeic acid esterified with fatty alcohols of different chain lengths (C1-C20) were better antioxidants than the original phenolic compound. The optimal chain length with respect to protection against oxidation was, however, different for the two food systems. Fish oil enriched mayonnaise with caffeates of medium alkyl chain length (butyl, octyl and dodecyl) added resulted in a better oxidative stability than caffeates with shorter (methyl) or longer (octadecyl) alkyl chains. Whereas in fish oil enriched milk emulsions the most effective caffeates were those with shorter alkyl chains (methyl and butyl) rather than the ones with medium and long chains (octyl, dodecyl, hexadecyl and eicosyl). These results demonstrate that there might be an optimum alkyl chain length for each phenolipid in each type of emulsion systems. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Teixeira A.S.,CONICET | Navarro A.S.,CONICET | Navarro A.S.,National University of La Plata | Molina-Garcia A.D.,Instituto Ciencia Y Tecnologia Of Alimentos Y Nutricion Ictan Csic | And 2 more authors.
Food and Bioproducts Processing | Year: 2015

Corn starch is considered a good vehicle for delivering bioactive compounds such as supplements or health promoting additives. The ability of starch treated by high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) to bind and carry zinc and magnesium salts and natural antioxidants of yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis) extracts was tested. A uniform distribution of the minerals on the surface of starch granules was observed by SEM-EDX and significantly higher amounts of minerals were loaded by HHP treated starches. Calorimetric analysis showed the effect of both HHP treatment and the active compounds addition, while crystal fraction was determined by X-ray diffraction, denoting the presence of minerals in the starch granule. It was found that the type of starch carrier did not affect total polyphenol loading. Besides, HPLC analysis showed that the relative composition of polyphenols from yerba mate extract was maintained. These results support the use of HHP treated corn starch as an alternative carrier for molecules of nutritional interest into food systems. © 2015 The Institution of Chemical Engineers. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Source


Deladino L.,CONICET | Teixeira A.S.,Instituto Ciencia Y Tecnologia Of Alimentos Y Nutricion Ictan Csic | Navarro A.S.,CONICET | Navarro A.S.,National University of La Plata | And 3 more authors.
Food and Bioproducts Processing | Year: 2015

Corn starch's ability to bind and carry a yerba mate extract with strong antioxidant properties was explored in this paper. The starch was treated by high hydrostatic pressure to increase its loading capacity and scanning electron microscopy revealed that the high pressure treatment altered the shape of starch granules and changed their surface appearance. High pressure caused partial granule gelatinization as determined by calorimetric measurements, also increasing the granule specific surface area, as quantified by nitrogen adsorption. This increase in surface was due to the generation of pores, which favored the adsorption of the yerba mate hydrosoluble polyphenols. The yerba mate polyphenol concentration in the starch carriers was determined by HPLC-MS and its antioxidant activity was measured by the DPPH radical and photochemiluminiscense (PCL) methods. Treated starches incorporated a higher amount of yerba mate polyphenols, however, native starch could be an appropriate antioxidant carrier as well. Furthermore, it was found that the antioxidant activity was maintained after high pressure treatment without changing the yerba mate polyphenols profile. © 2014 The Institution of Chemical Engineers. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Source

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